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5

With the old telephone systems which were in use 30..40 years ago such crosstalk happened from time to time. I'm not sure about the quality of the phone system in your place, but this is at least something I've experienced myself several times. Of course it could be also related to phone tapping but I doubt that somebody who maliciously taps the phone will ...


4

Smartphones are essentially hand-held computers with the ability to make phone calls. However, there are some common signs: Data Usage is going up when it shouldn't be You can't reliably hide data trails in all cases. Here's an example: you are traveling abroad, and your plan's data usage keeps going up dramatically, despite the fact that you have ...


4

You can't, at least not until mobile OS developers stop prioritizing UX over security. For now the best you can do is to make sure the app you're using is from a legitimate and trusted developer, and the credentials it's asking for are related to the function of the app (a photo app asking for Instagram credentials to post on it seems alright, but the same ...


4

It's nothing to worry about, there's no reason to believe that you're compromised from just what you've stated. Addresses are assigned by the chip manufacturer (and, the bluetooth and wifi are likely on the same chip), it's most likely just easier for the manufacturer to increment by 1 for each one. The bluetooth/wifi addresses are also expected to be ...


3

The clipboard indeed cannot be considered a safe place, this for several reasons: Malware accessing the clipboard content: in your question you focused on malware installed in your machine, however there could be transient malware (like a malicious Adobe Flash banner on a website you visited for instance...) which will not infect your computer when run, ...


2

When malware is present on the device, indeed, having the pasteboard store this data would be the least of your worries. However, this is still bad practice. You should not store important user data in the clipboard. You shouldn't even be putting it in the pasteboard/clipboard anyway. Why? Because a malicious application could access your clipboard data. ...


2

Yes, you can clone a SIM card. All you need is a SIM writer, a blank SIM, and roughly 15-30 minutes. (guide for v2 cards) Once that happens, they've effectively become your phone, and can intercept communications and messages, and charge your phone plan. I do not know of any "rogue SIM card attacks," most attackers focus on attacking the SIM cards ...


2

Androids permission model up to lollipop is flawed in the sense of usability, and they are moving towards context driven permission request model. Let us review the current situation again: You as a normal user are looking for an application and after searching the google play, you finally find it. As happy as you can be you click install, and then there ...


1

Are you defending against an attacker with full access to the device? If so, a credential encrypted with a PIN code (which implies it consists of only 4 or 6 digits) is very easy to decrypt - a maximum of only 10,000 or 1,000,000 tries and you're there. I would recommend verifying the PIN that the user entered against the server for authentication, and ...


1

IF someone asks to borrow my SIM card, am I vulnerable? YES The analogy Your sim card is like your social security number for your cell phone. Lending that to someone is the same as giving them your social. Now they have your information, you identity on the cell network, and can rack up charges by impersonating you. Worse yet they can even intercept your ...


1

A proxy is better for that. I think if you configure this proxy but skip the SSL cert configuration you should get your answer.



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