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3

Yes, it loses some of the protection since it fails to protect them if the device is thoroughly compromised. It still, however, protects against any number of limited attacks. For example, if they are configured to connect through a proxy that can strip the encryption, the 2FA will remain safe. If the password DB is compromised somewhere that they used ...


0

Try to find it through here: http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/top-8-online-tools-to-identify-the-owner-of-a-phone-number/ a site with usefull sites for this job, try googling it or googling services/sites that do such things. But as Xander already said, that ain't help you in your case.


2

SyncStop I saw some discussion about a device like this a while back; it was being called "USB Condom". Looks like they've changed the name to SyncStop. At the moment they have an ongoing Kickstarter campaign. SyncStop Vs power-only USB cable? It's not clear to me how SyncStop is different from a "power only USB cable" (as @DavidWachtfogel mentioned), ...


3

Unfortunately no, there's no way for an end user to trace that information. Your cell phone provider should at least be able to trace it back to the SMSC that it was sent from, however they are unlikely to do so without some sort of police request or court order. If you are being threatened or genuinely harassed then get the police involved, they have the ...


5

Any site that claims to be able to do that is a scam. Such technology would have to exploit some kind of backdoor, and if such a backdoor exists, it would only be known to law enforcement. If knowledge of such a backdoor leaks, you can be sure that there would be a media frenzy over it, and the vulnerability would quickly be fixed. Phone monitoring ...


2

It is possible. Let's consider the quicker one with an active attack. Look at: The full presentation: http://www.slideshare.net/iazza/dcm-final-23052013fullycensored Another way could be the use of SS7 queries to the HLR/VLR of the Victim's MNO. (this obviously imply that the attacker has a certain level of permissions/access to the core network (e.g. ...


1

Actually Phonegap apps are not really "all native". Only system functionalities (like file access, camera access, etc.) are translated to their Java counter-parts. It still uses a webview and a lot of javascript to implement the application business logic. So, answering your question, the local storage issue is still a valid concern as it is a feature of ...


0

Some Samsung devices are imported - as such you can buy some on the Internet. Generally, they are shipped still with the same carrier applications. Baidu browser may be one of those applications that the carrier software tries to install on your device. I have an imported device and when I rooted it it showed some carrier software located in the ...


4

You're confusing two different companies and products: WhisperText LLC which develops the Whisper App They're the geolocating datasharing company that drew the criticism you linked. Open Whisper Systems which develops TextSecure, RedPhone, Signal These are various end to end encrypted products. I have seen no reason to distrust them. But obviously even ...


1

Well, according to PhoneGap/Cordova security guide it seems that localstorage is not recommend to store sensitive data. So what you can do? Well, here are two options I think you can use. 1- Encrypt the refresh token and store it encrypted in the localstorage. You can use CryptoJS (a JS library to encrypt/decrypt the data) to encrypt your token using AES ...


0

its getting tough to use the online numbers for verification. Last time I try with one application, but they are using missed call mobile verification ( some thing like Cognalys) and the virtual numbers are not showing any call logs. The last five digits from the missed call number was the OTP... :)


0

I would suggest you Create a Hotspot on your Laptop Install WireShark on your Laptop Run Wireshark on the your network interface that the HotSpot is on Disable GSM Services on your phone Enable WIFI on your phone and connect to your Hotspot (from step 1) Watch the Traffic flow from your Phone What I think you will find is .... Most data is being sent ...


2

Your VPN has an end-point, where the pipe terminates. Your service provider sees this end point, and by using GEO-IP can quickly identify the country, City and even area where this end-point is located. Not sure why you should be surprised about this - A VPN will only protect your communications from YOUR ISP.... Where the traffic appears it will be subject ...


5

Your carrier would not see your VPN address directly, because that is in the encrypted part of the VPN traffic -- all that is visible to them is the public IP address of the VPN endpoint you are connected to. What is most likely happening here is that an app installed by your provider contacted them through the VPN, at which point they can see the address ...


13

IMEI is like a GUID (Global Unique Identifier), that identifies your unique handset. Your carrier can blacklist your IMEI by instructing the GSM Alliance to do so, so that the mobile can't connect to any networks, usually in the case the handset is lost or stolen. Your handset's IMEI is sent in the handshake process when connecting to a network, and can be ...


17

Your carrier certainly sees the target IP address of the packets that you are asking them to transmit. The carrier's job is to, indeed, carry your packets from your phone to the base station, and, from that base station, to route it to the nearest infrastructure link so that it may reach its ultimate destination. In your case, all the packets that you send ...


20

As @Lighty said, the IMEI is a unique identifier for your phone (not the SIM card though, that would be the IMSI). You can think of it as an equivalent to a MAC address in Ethernet. The IMEI could be spoofed to impersonate you / your phone. Your phone could get traced in a network using the IMEI (It actually is to maintain your connection). The IMEI is also ...


0

Nowadays the SIM cards hold less personal info than they used to hold; smartphones don't store contacts in the SIM anymore, SMS messages are immediately copied to the smartphone's memory and erased from the SIM, so in the end the only personal thing that's left is the phone number itself, it can still be used for social engineering, calling premium rate ...


1

Thieves are stealing phones now, not for the value of the phone, but because before it's reported lost or stolen they're dialling premium rate numbers which they control. They get a share of the revenue from dialling the numbers so they steal the phone, transfer the SIM to another phone and then call the premium rate number. The original owner of the phone ...



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