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1

As @guki117 pointed out in his answer, the iPhone is connecting as a camera. You should be able to exploit that with a basic digital camera with a removable memory card, put whatever files you want on the card, put it back in the camera and connect the camera with USB. The files should be right there.


3

It's most likely connecting as a Media Device or Camera. There's a seperate GPO for each type of removable media. Perhaps this particular policy only enforces against flash drives. This is quite common on androids.. I can switch my device to be a Camera and bypass our GPO for blocking removable devices.


0

The base concept to do this is sniffing on the traffic , you can do that as follows . create an access point from your Laptop , and than connect to that access point by your mobile , and start wireshark on that point you created , if there is data passing that the phone is spying on you , that data maybe encrypted and you may never know if it is really ...


1

Wireshark will show you any network traffic for any device on your wifi network, provided it goes across your wifi network. If it's encrypted, though, you won't see the content, just the destination IP and a blob of meaningless bytes. If it's sent over the mobile data network, you won't see it at all.


1

There are unpowered transmitters (or rather powered by the receiver), such as NFC and RFID tags, and with enough specialized hardware, it may be possible to read/send a very small amount of information (and repeat for a very low bandwidth communication), but these would be extremely limited without a battery or capacitor (note: while most capacitors do have ...


9

If you have a phone with a removable main battery, you can try this: Disable the cellular network, GPS, WiFi, Bluetooth etc on your phone by turning them off manually and then putting the phone into flight mode. Make a note of the current time shown on the phone and on your PC by writing it down on paper. Shut down the phone, remove the main battery and ...


5

You must define "transmitting". There are two categories; active and passive. Active transmissions require relatively large amounts of power to actually send out data whereas passive transmissions require little to no added power and could represent a NFC transmission such as an RFID chip being read by a scanner. There are also some theoretical ...


2

No, even with any internal capacitors or small secondary batteries, there isn't enough power to get off even a small amount of transmission. Transmission simply requires too much power, even for relatively short range given the type of transmitter in the phone. It would be possible to design a system where the phone could receive a command to do ...


-1

No. The radio(s) require power. Without radio(s) there is no transmitting. While it is quite possible for silicon circuitry to maintain state in the condition described they cannot transmit.


1

Practically - no. The SIM card is a computer. By design, this computer can control the mobile phone. It is possible to install new software on this computer, but if this SIM card wasn't created by you, you can't sign new software properly and it will not work. (Also sorry for my english :) There is interesting Defcon 21 video "The Secret Life of SIM Cards" ...


3

There are many ways to track a users location on a mobile device (I will go into how that works later). None of the tracking methods are particularly easy to spoof. It can be done but it is simply outside of the realm of the average user as it generally requires either a modified device (physically or programmatically) or external gear. Moreover, it is ...


1

For Ingress, Google's global wargame, a range of anti-spoofing measures are used. Google are keeping quiet about the full range, but two that have been demonstrated are: Speed limitation: 40mph maximum allowed in game Corroborating measures: cross referencing wifi SSID's received with their location database


0

The short answer is that (as far as I'm aware) it isn't possible to perfectly stop location emulation on open platforms (e.g. Android). Other more restrictive platforms (e.g. non-jailbroken iOS/Windows Phone) don't tend to suffer as much from these problems as they don't allow users the same level of freedom in terms of the types of applications they can ...


0

From my knowledge the way you spoof the locations is to : 1) Use developer mode with mock locations. There are ways of detecting that you are using developer mode so the developer can decide that the GPS is not to be trusted in this case. So they will use other ways of finding your location like wifi networks. 2) You can fake your position when your phone ...


0

The question is whether its a one time use and forget, or is it kept in their database and used for future verification If you are certainly sure that it is a one time usage, I don't think there is any problem using a virtual number. If not, you might end up losing control of the account if you are required for that number (two factor auth for example) or ...


1

This UUID is stored in the device (should i crypt or hash it ?) : For Android application you can use this library, which is an encrypted wrapper for SharedPreferences, because SharedPreferences on Android stores data in "plain text", so an attacker can easily have access to this data. For iOS application : Keychain is a secured place of storing ...


-1

The encrypion is between Mobile station and BTS, not between two Mobile Station, the encryption will be only between A and B, where A is your phone and B your BTS.


0

Turns out LTE can use two types of algorithms for authentication and key generation: Test – For Test algorithm the OP is not required, so if current LTE operator is supporting Test algorithm for authentication and key generation then OP is not required and in this case USIM doesn’t contain OP. MILENAGE – For MILENAGE OP is mandatory. Meaning: if operator ...


1

As others have noted you can never trust the client, ever. You can make it difficult for people but there will always be attacks they can perform: Artificially inflate measure of round trip time (RTT) Extract encryption keys Alter local clocks Monitoring for suspicious behavior / timing irregularities may be possible though extremely difficult. For ...


49

The SIM card contains a private key or more commonly a symmetric key called the "Ki", and the card is designed to never divulge this key to the outside world. The SIM card itself has physical security measures to make reading the key from the card very difficult without destroying the original card and/or the data stored in the card. For a long time, this ...



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