New answers tagged

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Belated answer: Yes. DROPOUTJEEP, MONKEYCALENDAR, PICASSO, TOTEGHOSTLY, WATERWITCH, WARRIOR PRIDE, TRACKER SMURF, etc. are NSA-developed tools whose existence Edward Snowden and others have revealed. MONKEYCALENDAR is software used by law enforcement that transmits a mobile phone's location by hidden text message. TRACKER SMURF provides "high-precision ...


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NB: I am the CTO of this company :). We have a tool that is designed to be superfast and integrates into CI really well. We built it from the ground up to work for mobile. Be great to get your feedback! www.codifiedsecurity.com.


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Any delay would be a security benefit. One way to look at it is that everything can be cracked, it is just a matter of time. By adding delays, one is increasing the amount of time it takes to break the security. You want the time it takes to crack to be longer than the time the item needs to be secure. In the case of fingerprints, the fingerprint gets ...


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I work in Geolocation and do a lot of work resolving questions as to location of devices. To get back to the original question posted: If the police have an email, sent by a suspect over a 3G or 4G network, could they use the IP address (since they know when it was sent) to find out - from the service provider - the precise location the email was sent ...


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As far as I know, Whatsapp uses Certificate Pinning. When I tried to analyze the Android app in january, it didn't accept my forged certificates (created with mitmproxy). I didn't invesigate this further and I might have missed something. However, Whatsapp upgraded its encryption algorithms earlier this year and introduced end-to-end encryption, and ...


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All previous answers are good with lots of technical details. Yet no one mentions the probabilities that the suspect may use Anonymous Remailer. Though the service itself is a myth in Internet (I never use it myself), it is possible in principle. And there are previous cases against it. In the ideal situation, the suspect may construct a mailing-chain of ...


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There are really a couple of things involved here, that probably involve different companies. Firstly there is the originating IP address, usually not a hard problem (at least as far as finding the originating mail server). Most of the better behaved servers will prepend this information in the email header before passing the mail on (There are ways ...


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This answer is a little more in the weeds. The exact server you would use to determine where a user is, within the cellular network is called the PGW, or PDN Gateway. This is the server that is used for lawful interception of traffic, it also other information about the every end user on the network, such as billing information. What hasn't been mentioned ...


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Speaking as a wireless telecom professional, the answer to your question depends on how precise you expect the location to be. With minimal effort (and a legal obligation to do so), I can tell exactly which cellsite(s) you were using, which narrows your location down to a particular geographic area. And we don't even need to know the IP Address, we just ...


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Well, if he was already a suspect, you wouldn't need the email to begin with. The investigators could have been watching their mobile phone wanderabouts the whole time (or another agency have already put this guy on watch, and thus the mobile has more data about it). The other option is that you have an email, but no idea who the criminal is (for example, ...


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Around ten years ago it was more likely. Back then, many free website-based e-mail providers (including Yahoo) added the IP address of the machine the e-mail was sent from to the e-mail header. I didn't check what every provider does now, but I would guess most providers now put the IP of their server instead of the sender's machine into the header. if I ...


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Earlier answers already describe the process of using triangulation to pinpoint the location of a specific phone better than I could describe it. However there is very little said about whether the investigators can figure out which exact phone the mail was sent from. In traditional mail services where the user run an email client on their device and use ...


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No, the location is not traced for everyone in logs - unless it's under the watch/hood before. The last resort here - usually, if no previous location trace is enabled - a base stations where the IP-carrying node was active at the moment.


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You have plenty of good suggestions here. But at the risk of ruining my script writing career, the most visual scheme to use would be the "silent ping", that is if you want to find the person in real time. I will discuss email as well later in the post. The silent ping takes advantage of a mode of SMS where nothing appears on your phone. The three letter ...


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There's another common way that email leaks location information. If the email includes a photograph that was taken on a smartphone, the photo will usually have location information embedded. Since you're writing the story, you might contrive to have the sender email a photo for some reason. The JPEG standard (used for virtually all mobile phone photos) ...


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In addition to what @schroeder wrote, I would like to point out a few things about geolocation. Among other things, a CDR (Call Detail Record) contains information about the cell tower used by the mobile phone at the time. Note that a cell tower can cover an area of about one square mile, or more. In some countries, mobile operators might always be able to ...


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If the police have an email, sent by a suspect over a 3G or 4G network, could they use the IP address (since they know when it was sent) to find out - from the service provider - the precise location the email was sent from? Yes, this is very easy. However... the key word here is "precise location." Not exactly. Not unless the phone is hacked. ...


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The problem with this scenario is that emails are typically not sent from the device itself, but from a central service. In order to do what you want, the investigators would have to make a few hops: to the email service (gets the user account details, including the IP the user used to connect with) to the ISP the device used at the time of sending (gets ...


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As the exposure is only to a few customers, it may be that the risk is low. That said, I'd err on the side of caution and treat the private key as having been compromised. This means revoking the signing certificate and creating a new one. (Applications signed prior to revocation will continue to be valid.) If you want to take a less cautious route, you can ...


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From the github readme for the iOS SSL Kill Switch project: Once installed on a jailbroken device, iOS SSL Kill Switch patches low-level SSL functions within the Secure Transport API So your question basically boils down to: "How do I prevent my app from being infected with malware on a rooted / jailbroken device?". In short: you don't. This is why you ...


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There is no point in trying to prevent this. Technically I guess you could slow down an attacker by implementing your own crypto (SSL Kill Switch modifies the OS-provided crypto functions) but even that will eventually get cracked given enough time and effort. If you don't control the hardware, your software has no chances. Just live with it and let people ...


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The more information third parties have about a consumer the more accurately they can profile what causes a consumer to make decisions. Simply knowing what app's are on a mobile device can reveal a lot of demographic information about the user (think dating apps, news apps, religious apps, type of games purchased, etc). Likewise the type of hardware you are ...


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No. The attack-vector described in the article requires the PC to be compromised in some way and requires someone to intercept the radio-traffic sent from your PC. So first of all: unless your working on some really complex stuff that would be worth spying on it with great effort, you're pretty unlikely to be attacked this way anyways. 2FA via smartphone ...



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