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5

(Difficulty: Incredibly Easy): If you're in Developer Mode, many of the restrictions in place to keep you safe are missing. This makes it easy for developers to test apps, but makes the device incredibly insecure. Thankfully, turning on Developer Mode is non-trivial in newer versions of Android (just a few years ago, it was not much more than a checkbox in ...


1

An Android client application should not be vulnerable to CSRF attacks (except for a browser application like Chrome, but it is not the application here that is vulnerable, it is the website being browsed). This is because for an CSRF to succeed, the client needs to be able to send cookies to the vulnerable website. An Android application would only access ...


0

Most of the Android applications are written in Java. As long as you don't use native code, it's not possible to cause buffer overflow or memory corruptions. In android it's possible to use native code and compile them using Android NDK [1]. Applicqtions like Firefox and Chrome are using native codes. Many opensource libraries can be compiled for android ...


2

The generic answer for "is my code vulnerable to directory traversal?" is to ask yourself if your code: Uses filename strings that you got from an untrusted source to read/write files on disk? "Untrusted sources" could be direct user input, things you read from files (which could have been tampered with), or from 3rd party code that your code interacts ...


0

SQLite supports prepared queries and bound parameters, so the issue is more with the use of the tool, rather than the tool itself. If query parameters are used it's impossible to inject SQL into the process because the data is handled separately from the statement. The issue only arises if the developer has done something like: SQLStatement = "select * ...


1

SQL injection attacks apply when an application uses SQL and carelessly assembles SQL requests with attacker-provided elements. Here, "carelessly" means "without using prepared statements". Prepared statements are the correct way to do SQL with externally provided data; many developers try to think of it in terms of "escaping quoting characters", which is a ...


0

It's not. Many existing GSM networks are in the process of being shutdown -- AT&T has already announced a year or two ago about its plans to shutdown its GSM network completely by the end of 2016. As others mentioned, migration and shutdown takes time, since both the towers and the end-user equipment must be upgraded. Some latecomer mobile operators ...


5

The easiest way to understand the vulnerability is to look at the diff, dig through the code, and work out how you might exploit it. The vulnerable method's signature looks like this: status_t GraphicBuffer::unflatten( void const*& buffer, size_t& size, int const*& fds, size_t& count) { The important arguments here are void ...


1

While I'm unfamiliar with this specific vulnerability, I can answer this question in general. What exactly does this mean: A remote user can send specially crafted data to trigger an integer overflow in GraphicBuffer::unflatten() This does not mean that a remote attacker can somehow make a remote procedure call on GraphicBuffer::unflatten. It means ...


0

There have been some reports of hacked SIM communications before, like the one explained in this DefCon presentation from 2012, but this is all very much on a basic level and so far there have not been any known exploits for as far as I can tell. That said, in this presentation they did show how you can load custom code on the SIM so it is not hard to ...


0

As other answers mentioned, this issue seems very close to DRM issues, with the sole but notable exception that as per my understanding you do not need the video file to be playable by any other software than your own. To avoid any stored key, I would imagine the actual key to be deduced (like a hash) from several parameters defining your restriction (video ...


0

SSO architecture has layers to it, we can usually break these out into two main components: - The Identity Provider (IdP) sessions. - The Service Provider (SP) session. Each of these sessions will usually be preserved in the browser as a cookie, as you state above. The IdP session is usually the "key" to SSO, and has a set expiration date. However, in some ...


2

Google has the Widevine DRM mechanism (Video DRM solution). A tool that can play with the Widevine internals (libwvcdm) can be found here -- https://github.com/EiNSTeiN-/chromecast-widevine-tools There is also the Stagefright multimedia framework to supply DRM -- https://source.android.com/devices/media.html -- Josh Drake is doing a prezo on it at BlackHat ...


0

For you custom app, you can bundle the public keys into the app, and keep the private key on your custom device. You're already distributing an application, so including the key with it is no big deal.


1

Yes, these apps could record what you're typing, or generate arbitrary input events in your stead. There is hardly a thing you can do to prevent input-providing processes from abusing their privileges. This being said, there are some structural factors about how input is handled on mobile UIs that limit the risks of custom keyboards (as opposed to ...


2

Yes it's possible. Not sure if you know how IMSI catchers operates. An IMSI catcher blocks the smarter 3G and 4G signals, forcing mobile phones in the area to switch to the unsecured 2G service — something that phones also do routinely in more rural areas, where 2G service is widespread. The IMSI catcher then poses as a tower and "catches" signals. The ...


0

You would do it the same way you'd do it on a computer, but once the machine is compromised, all bets are off, and you're mostly wasting your time. You may check out this related question on which my answer suggests deriving a key from the hardware and using it to encrypt the sensitive data but even then, that only buys you more time until the attacker ...


-2

I have read a post which clearly stated that Whatsapp messages can be easily retained. Whatsapp is not a secured messaging App. Follow these steps to secure your ‪WhatsApp‬ from getting hacked: WhatsApp doesn’t have a very secure server, so avoid using WhatsApp when on Wi-Fi. Never share your IMEI number Avoid keeping your phone out at places where it can ...



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