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To give your question a concrete answer, you can not get this info alone. As others already told you, contact the authorities because this is a crime. This relies on them. The chances of success in such cases are not high because: authorities receive such reports every day. the sender probably prepared himself to avoid detection even if they trace him, ...


3

Sadly it will be very hard to track down the sender. The only way to track down a sender without a senders id to go through your carrier. For them the procedure is also hard as they would have to do the following: Track the message -> Track all hops it went through until it got to you -> Contact the senders service provider and ask for information (Only ...


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If you have a newer iPhone (> 4s) just turn on your passcode. It will encrypt all the data on the phone, so even if someone has access to your device, without the PIN / Password to the phone, it's useless.


2

The phone should know these passwords if it wants to use it, so it obviously keeps them somewhere in a readable format. If the phone is compromised the attacker would be able to read them. That's actually why some mail providers (GMail, etc) are moving to oAuth so that the phone stores a revokable token instead of the actual password. While that is possible,...


1

You could implement your own layer of encryption in addition to the one that TLS provides. Since you say that "we can exchange some additional data in registration phase" I think the easiest solution would be to share a symmetric encryption key (e.g. AES) during registration and then encrypt all further communication with that. (The IV will prevent brute ...


3

Well then, to try and fully answer your questions: Is it possible someone hacked to her phone and delete all her work contacts? I will say this with a resounding no. It's theoretically possible for them to hack into the device, but while not only highly unlikely it is also impractical for anybody to remove just her work contacts. The company has no ...


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It's likely her former employer deactivated her work account. If her contacts were saved/associated with the work email, then they would have been lost in the process.


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While not theoretically impossible, this is highly unlikely. For this to happend there would need to be a vulnerability in iOS that could be leveraged for this. While there are vulnerabilities in iOS (and in any software), unless I have missed something there is nothing that could be used for an attack just through a phone call. That does not rule out ...


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When you're using a proxy server, it is just that a proxy. Everything will be forced to go through it, whether it is wired, wireless, 2G, 3G, 4G, LTE. The browser is configured to do the following: phone (browser) --> go to Yahoo.com --> through this proxy (1.2.3.4) proxy --> Internet --> I need this page Yahoo --> Proxy <--> phone ...


8

The phone you are talking about is not the stock Samsung S4. As you can read in the article the cameras are removed, there is a special app store only and there are special apps on it. It also states that this phone was explicitly chosen because of the KNOX technology which includes secure boot and separation of work and private activities. The reason this ...


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One example is Apple iOS with iCloud Lock. You have to setup your iPhone with iCloud and FindMyiPhone ahead of time but if it is lost and beyond recovery you are able to lock and erase the device. Afterwards it will prompt the thief for your iCloud Credentials (it will not show the full email address making the attack harder). The iPhone will stay bricked ...


2

Unknown: there is actually no caller id data given. Probably totally stripped by the sender, but can happen in other ways like between networks that have no conversion between the Caller ID standard they are using. Hidden: the flag was set to say this is barred, the data is still sent all the way to the local telephone exchange of the receiver in most of ...


2

Very good question! Let me explain: Hidden: In every packet being sent to call centers there is a attribute of "hidden" this is a simple flag of true or false and so if the packet has this attribute set to "True" then the caller id will be hidden. Unknown: There is an attribute in the packet that holds the origin number that started the call. Since theses ...


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Download the Signal app for private and encrypted end to end conversation Those who are using Redphone and TextSecure RedPhone users will be prompted to download the new Signal app, while TextSecure users will simply need to install an update that keeps the same private chat capabilities as the previous app, also adding RedPhone's ability to make ...


1

I think the premise of the question is incorrect. We do use SMS in Europe. And even if it is not as commonly used as in the US (not sure that is actually true, but lets assume so), people still have cellphones with the capability to receive SMS. So 2FA with SMS can be used and is commoly used. Based on my experience (as opposed to actual statistics), I ...


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In most cases here in Sweden/Europe, recovery is done by Email. In case its a sensitive service, for example banking or something similiar to that, recovery must be done by physically visiting the bank and showing ID. Robocall is very uncommon in Sweden, mostly because its costly, and bears its own risks (reverse-charged numbers and similiar). In some ...


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I do not completely understand the question, but it seems that you want to know a good solution to implementing this. To implement this, I would suggest fetching a unique devide ID (Can be IMEI, but can also be some OS-dependent ID), and then concatenate this with the PIN. Then you use PBKDF2 to derive a key out of this. You then select a number of ...


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Your HTTP requests are proxied, hence the ipof.in service sees different IP addresses. I believe this answer explains it well, but another possibility (regardless of cellular/WiFi connection) is that your browser uses a Data Saver (Chrome*) or Turbo Mode (Opera) option. Both intended to compress the data for mobile devices. * Chrome feature seems not ...


43

I am just going to take a guess here. Your telephone data carrier may have an optimizing or caching proxy for content whose IP address appears in your JSON result. As the proxy has no visibility into encrypted HTTPS packets, it cannot proxy the content, so it may be routing directly with your public (routable) IP address. If this is the case, your phone ...


0

Yes, it is very possible. Your company has multiple ways of monitoring employee activity and traffic that is passing through their network. Depending on the type of company you work for, if they are constantly monitored and audited, etc will have an impact on the likelihood. Of course, this will greatly vary in every company, and it's best to keep browsing ...


2

This seems to me like it very much could be a cramming operation or a premium SMS scam. The US has cracked down on both practices in recent years, but they haven't disappeared completely, and of course, the situation is different in other countries. It would be wise to monitor future bills to make sure that there's no extra charges resulting from this. (...


1

I would assume the 9 digit number is a normal subscriber's number in your country? In that case, the sender probably can't gain anything financially from the messages alone, so this is probably preparation for further scams. The crooks probably batch sent these messages to find out 1) which numbers are valid and 2) which users are naive enough to believe ...


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Another thinbg you can do is remove it from "Trusted devices". Login to last pass. View your vault. Account Settings (near the bottom left of the screen). The third tab in the popup window is "Trusted Devices". Disable or Delete the broken phone.


3

They may or may not be using token based authorization, and they may or may not be timing out sessions. The reason they never ask you to log in again is entirely separate, and for convenience. Users don't want to log in over and over again, and apps that make them cause them to be unhappy, and being unhappy causes them to give the apps bad ratings, and bad ...


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As I don't have the reputation to comment or mark this question as a duplicate I'll provide you the information you require. Adi has a wonderful answer to what I believe is your question (link below): What can an attacker do with Bluetooth and how should it be mitigated? Of which I believe only the "What can an attacker do once a malicious device is ...


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The only feasible method for restricting records to specific users is to use authentication. You can use any of the built in identity providers (see https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/app-service-mobile-xamarin-ios-get-started-users/ for more information) or you can use a custom authentication scheme (see the sample at https://github....


1

If you are developing an Android application one simple way to check for common vulnerabilities is running QARK on it. QARK will scan your app and checks for common security issues. Similarly, you can use the ZED attack proxy against the server. If these tools don't find anything or you fixed all the issues they reported, this does not mean your ...


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I think your group is in fact a so-called Super Group. Super Groups work a little differently than normal groups and the one-check/two-check system doesn't apply here. All messages get double checks instantly when received by the server. (That's a feature.) The creator of your original group has clicked the 'upgrade to supergroup' button at some point, ...


1

If the data on your phone was not encrypted and protected by a strong passcode/passphrase, whoever has it now will be able to access your information as long as the phone does not connect to the Internet. It is good that you have requested a factory reset in case the phone does connect, but that cannot be guaranteed. Putting your phone's IMEI (...


1

No. If they have the device, and there is no encryption enabled (e.g. lock screen PIN), they can read whatever they like from it. They won't be able to use it as a phone (they could use it as a fancy iPod if they wanted) in countries which support phone blacklists, or to access Apple services, but any data stored on the device itself could be accessed. This ...


0

All information that is available through your phones supported profiles. For modern smart phones this will most likely include: SIM and device contacts SMS messages Your phone uinique bluetooth MAC If your phone supports advanced bluetooth profiles such as OBEX (all Android phones that I owned so far did not support this out of the box) Read/Write/...


1

The attack vectors remain the same. The only difference is that mobile phones might provide an additional attack surface with other services reachable like Bluetooth and GSM/UMTS/GPRS/... Check public vulnerability databases for entries regarding WLAN or other network issues to determine the known attack surface of mobile devices. Once in a while there is ...



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