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4

No. The attack-vector described in the article requires the PC to be compromised in some way and requires someone to intercept the radio-traffic sent from your PC. So first of all: unless your working on some really complex stuff that would be worth spying on it with great effort, you're pretty unlikely to be attacked this way anyways. 2FA via smartphone ...


3

The most secure option is to buy two U2F devices (about $20 USD each), register both, and put one in a safe deposit box. SMS can be redirected to voicemail, and is susceptible to phishing. TOTP is safer but is still susceptible to phishing U2F is not susceptible to phishing


2

There are different risks to assess in a recovery situation: First you have the backup codes WoJ told you in the comments. You should print out them and store in either your PC or somewhere else like your wallet (better in both!). If these codes are lost it's not a "big deal" because those don't guarantee direct access to the account, first you need to know ...


3

As helphul as it might be for you to figure out the motivation behind all of this, that is nothing we might help you with. As far as the breach of your system goes: A lot of online identities seem to be affected and compromised. Your computer seems to be not you computer anymore. There are several things we cannot help you with: If you linked your ...


2

Phone/SMS verification works, it just solves a different problem than loss of your phone. Phone verification prevents against an attacker impersonating a user by logging in as them from some random network device using their username and password. For example, if a user's password is exposed because they reuse the same email and password on multiple sites, ...


1

I can think of 2 ways the phone-based verification helps, even if your mobile device is how you access sensitive web sites. Both require that only you have physical access to your device. If you use your phone to enter your credentials on a phony web site (for example due to a phishing attack) then when the attacker tries to use them to log into the ...


0

Malware can read CAPTCHA which can used as part of multifaceted authentication. It's also possible to install software on a user's machine to create an RDP style session and spy on someone. A key logging virus can capture your key strokes and send the contents to a remote destination. So many ways exist to obtain multifaceted authentication data within a ...


3

malware that is able to "read" someone's screen or take screenshots of it, making even the usage of multifactor authentication vulnerable. There is a wide variety of legal and illegal remote access software which enable the attacker to fully control the system, see the remote desktop etc. Some banking trojans integrate this facility to work around ...



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