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SMS or app: App-style access is more secure on both major platforms since app data is sandboxed while SMS provider is publicly accessible from all apps. Android is a little bit more secure than iOS since it gives the user a list of privileges an app is using hence giving out a clue to the user to be more cautious when the app asks for SMS access (or, if ...


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2FA is meant to help only in the initial login. You depend on end to end encryption to safeguard the transmissions. Conceivably you could force the user to reinput whatever tokens are available to reinstate the perceived trust between you and the endpoint, but as people goes, typing in the password multiple times is not a great convenience that anyone would ...


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While I generally agree with @schroeder, one point of difference is that, without 2FA, once your password is captured in this MITM scenario the attacker has unrestricted access to your account. However, with 2FA, even if they MITM your password and your one-time-password, this access will only allow them to see your traffic while they are actively ...


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2FA would not protect you when in a MITM situation. Imagine this scenario: the Google login page is fake, and everything you enter is captured by the MITM. You supply your credentials, then the fake site passes that on to Google. Google challenges the MITM for the 2FA code, but passes that request on to you. You supply the passcode, and now the MITM passes ...


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There are a few benefits that persist in 2FA: A keylogger can't make use of my 2FA passwords for later. I can't share my 2FA with somebody on an ongoing basis. I'm more likely to know my 2FA credentials are compromised (e.g., because my token is missing) than somebody simply copying my sticky note hidden in my wallet. Somebody who phishes you will be have ...


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It is all about tolerance to risk. As you stated, a sufficiently strong password (and assuming no shortcomings on application of security, etc... which is a large leap of faith) means that cracking could take an unreasonably long amount of time (today at least). The question is how much risk are you willing to take? When we are talking about digital security ...



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