Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Seeing a 'filtered' state for a port has nothing to do with a "ping" or an exploitation attempt. Nmap's traffic is generally not exploitative. An adaptive firewall could detect the default (with privileges) half-open SYN scan after it has detected an open port, or it could detect any of it scan types based on the number of closed ports it tries to connect ...


2

The standard scan method (TCP SYN) used by nmap for TCP scans is to start opening a connection, then abandon it halfway through. Individually, these connections are indistinguishable from an ordinary connection. Collectively, they can be identified because of how many of them there are, but it takes a while for the evidence to build up and the firewall to ...


1

Simply use the + character before the script name to force execution of a script. Emphasis mine: There are two special features for advanced users only. One is to prefix script names and expressions with + to force them to run even if they normally wouldn't (e.g. the relevant service wasn't detected on the target port). The other is that the ...


4

The other answers here are very good. However, there are a couple ways to do what you want that will work without editing the scripts: You can teach Nmap to recognize this service. Nmap's service fingerprints are in the nmap-service-probes file. Nmap already recognizes some versions of MiniShare with this match line, added in Nmap 6.00: match http ...


4

In your last test result, the question mark ("ntp?" instead of "ntp") tells that nmap was not able to recognize the running service. He therefore guess NTP only relying on the kind of service usually associated to this port number, but without any confidence at all (hence the question mark). The headers sent by this service are very minimalistic: HTTP/1\.1 ...


0

This is the same as what hitting the port directly in a browser will give you, it's a text/html document! with stylesheet and a 400 status code, transmitted over HTTP 1.1. 400 Bad Request The server cannot or will not process the request due to something that is perceived to be a client error (e.g., malformed request syntax, invalid request message ...


0

To begin with, don't use something like 'nmap -sUVC' especially when scanning a large port range. For if you do this, the result is most likely that many ports are marked as open|filtered, and nmap will pound on each of them in the actual UDP-scan and in the service version detection - each up to max-retries many times and with nmap's progressively slower ...



Top 50 recent answers are included