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30

You effectively can't. If you're on somebody else's machine and they have administrative rights to it, then that's the game. The quite fancy answer be mandatory access control systems like SELinux which hold a concept higher than root that would at least require a reboot and direct system access to change the settings.


11

Seems pretty obvious that you could just disconnect the network cable. Plug in the USB, Dump/Upload files, eject the USB, then reconnect to the network. This should prevent them from having any kind of access to the drive (read or write) Unless they own the computers AND have some mechanism to download everything on any connected usb device (which is ...


10

A combination of two USB drives and a hub might be a good solution Use the write-protected USB drive for any data that you dont want to get sabotaged and the other USB drive for anything you want to save and take with you home.


5

If you are only concerned about write operations, you could buy a cheap SD card and a USB reader. SD cards have a physical "Write protect" switch on the side. You may be able to find physically write-protectable USB drives too. If all fails, use a good ol' DVD.


3

It sounds like what you have there is a VPN option known as "split tunnelling" set-up. In this configuration, traffic for your home network is directed over the VPN and all other traffic goes straight to its destination. If your goal is to protect all your general traffic from sniffing attacks in the coffee shop or other location that you access it from, ...


3

These shares are call "administrative shares". They are there to enable the smooth working of pretty much all network management tools. They aren't a security risk unless you explicitly make them one: by default, they aren't accessible but by an admin account and such an account and local admin accounts can only be used remotely if they have a password ...


3

All your client side security efforts are doomed to failure. Obfuscation and hiding your source just isn't going to work. The more valuable the data you are working with the sooner your code is going to be reverse engineered. The only logical approach to consider everything client side public. Your approach should be to focus your security on server ...


2

When you are under an MITM attack, typically the attacker has complete control of part of the link between you and your intended destination. For this reason, it is usually difficult to "bypass" MITM, if done correctly, because the attacker is fully in control of your traffic and free to direct it to wherever he pleases. The attacker can basically just ...


2

This is based on personal experience with a femtocell issued by the German chapter of O2 (a branded Alcatel-Lucent 9361). For other femtocells and operators, the configuration might be different. Setting up a Whitelist of Cell Users By default, every O2 customer (and those roaming from other operators and countries, of course) is allowed to connect to ...


2

In basic language we can say VPN provides access to private network (corporate / office ) from outside, using secure network connection over the public network (Internet/ISP). Types of VPN: Site-to-site VPNs connect entire networks to each other -- for example, connecting a branch office network to a company headquarters network. In a site-to-site VPN, ...


1

Check out these two guides for more info: http://blog.ipredator.se/howto/openwrt/configuring-openvpn-on-openwrt.html http://tokyobreeze.wordpress.com/2015/01/15/install-openvpn-in-a-router-with-4mb-flash/ The basic idea is to create 3 separate zones, use zone forwarding from LAN to VPN, and turn on Masquerading and MSS clamping on the VPN zone. Be sure to ...


1

The seminal work on detection of promiscuous interfaces on the network is Detection of Promiscuous Modes using ARP Packets: ...promiscuous mode detection is performed by checking the responses of ARP packets, when ARP request packets are sent to all nodes on the network I don't know of implementations offhand, but the paper is detailed enough for ...


1

The Internet is a wild place; there are tons (as in, hundreds of thousands or even millions) of script-kiddie bots constantly scanning every single IP address looking for open ports they can connect to or unsecured servers they can exploit. This is most likely likely the kind of activity that you're seeing. Fortunately, the vast majority of consumer routers ...


1

You could use an SSH tunnel, which would encrypt your network traffic and route it through your home. The problem is that you'll likely not be able to access local network resources (fileshares, intranet, etc.) while tunneling. And while your net-admin may not know exactly what you're doing, he or she will still see that you're doing something. It may rouse ...


1

In the old days, if you were a big company with multiple private local networks in multiple locations, you connected them together by installing private data lines between the various locations to make a Wide-Area Network. Then the Internet came along, and you also had to connect each site to the Internet. It turns out that Internet feeds are much, much ...


1

There are low tech solutions that will work: Possibly combined with an IR repeater: if you want to limit the remote control to, say the front of the room where the teacher stands. That won't help if your teachers want to stroll around the students and operate the Beamer; as @AJHenderson says, there is no security protocol for the existing remotes. ...


1

No, the purpose of a sniffer is to capture all packets, unless a filter has been applied at capture time. Using a new protocol might mean the data can't automatically be rendered or analysed with more effort, but you will find they are all still saved to the file. All the sniffer is doing is analysing captured data in the same way a router or gateway would ...


1

Your question is a little vague, so I would advise that you consider what threat models you're trying to protect yourselves from. The first thing to do is to define that a DMZ is a region in your network which is considered wholly or partially untrusted, because it is attached to the Internet (or some other untrusted and hostile network). The DMZ defines a ...


1

A better way to protect against cryptolocker is to set up a NAS, that will force versioning of files. With force, I mean that all Changes of files will be saved on the NAS, and the client has no way to affect this. Then you save all important data on this versioned NAS. If the cryptolocker encrypts your NAS, you simply tell the NAS to rollback the files ...


1

Since a virus infected PC has to download (encrypt) reupload the entire file, and repeat the process for every network drive, is is possible to detect this unusually high bandwidth event? Is there a way to respond to it (via QOS or something?) You're mistaken: the malware doesn't need to transfer the file. It uses asymmetrical encryption: the file is ...


1

I'm posting this new answer to my question because one part of my original question was not completely addressed. Specifically, what kind of tool could be used to make so many connection attempts, seemingly more quickly than the minimum delay time I had set in my pam configuration. Well, it looks like a tool like hydra (see www.thc.org) was used. To check ...



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