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22

Just wanted to chime in and say that the list you have there isn't entirely 100% accurate, but it is close. Keep in mind that this will vary per MDM vendor and mobile OS, but MobileIron can see your location if your employer enables the functionality and you choose to accept sharing your location data. How exactly is this done? They just configure ...


21

TL:DR - Yes, routers CAN be vulnerable. Misconfigured/Unconfigured routers - A ton of people just install their routers and leave the default accounts turned on without modification. Thus allowing attackers easy access. Vulnerable built in scripts - http://www.reddit.com/r/netsec/comments/1xy9k6/that_new_linksys_worm/ See: What is the ...


20

Yep. Open wireless networks are entirely unencrypted; anyone can see all the data you send (even if they aren't connected to the network).


13

Other answers have been given to answer whether routers are secure: your router likely has unpatched vulnerabilities. A recommendation for making things more secure would be to put a real Linux box in front of your router. Configure it for automatic security updates every 10-30 minutes so your patches come quickly. For kernel vulnerabilities, you could use ...


10

My company is currently going through the process of implementing an MDM for all work phones... So perhaps something that I can help with. The company will install profiles and policies onto the mobile device which (On top of what you have outlined above in image) can enforce the following: Constant VPN connection (Ability to intercept network traffic to ...


10

an open wireless connection means there is no password exchange required to connect to the network. most data used over an open wireless connection is easily observed. once connected however, there are ways to encrypt your data such as using a vpn. This would allow data to be encrypted over an open wireless connection like public hotspots. though an observer ...


7

A router is actually a small computer; most of them use the same kind of software as full-fledged servers (typically some Linux variant). As such, it has security holes, that should be patched promptly when discovered. Vulnerabilities that are not fixed might be exploitable and yield remote control to attackers, at which point they can do what they want with ...


7

WifiKill uses a simple ARP spoofing, i.e. it floods all the devices on the WLAN and attempts to impersonate the access point. There is nothing you can do on your device - you would need to deploy an IP filter on the same, and drop all ARP packets. This would prevent you from talking to any device in the WLAN. To be able to do that again you would need to ...


4

Use the company phone for business and keep things separate. Only an optimistic and idealistic person would hope or expect that you will not encounter any issues going forwards. Sometimes you need to keep things separate, this is one of those times, who knows what the future will hold and what kind of situation you might find yourself in where data on one ...


4

From a security stand point, you will generally prefer to have your own device. This just keeps everything separate. Even if you backup your phone and all your data, it is probably better to keep it separate. This also assume that the company permits by policy and by technical controls the ability for you to independently backup your device. You also run the ...


3

Your "screen" includes many elements that never get transmitted over the network, so there is no method by which anyone on the network could see those elements. For example, if I set my desktop wallpaper, no one on the network can see that. Might it be possible to see a user's browser window (i.e. reconstruct a clone of the traffic to the computer)? Yes, ...


3

Hi I'm the developer who wrote VyprVPN for Mac. It looks like you've still got one of our software components installed. Macintosh applications that needs to alter your system, including VyprVPN, uses something called a "privileged helper tool” aka a system daemon. We install a helper tool with the user's permission, using the appropriate Apple API for this ...


2

There is a specific IETF RFC that addresses spoofed BGP source prefixes being advertised into a network. For an ISP the default is to trust the other ISP and it is up to your peers to enforce this rigorously and some do not. https://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-jdurand-bgp-security-00#section-4.1.2.2


2

It's a bad idea to host a database server on your internet facing webserver. If the underlying OS of your web/DB server, or webserver platform itself contains any vulnerabilities that can be exploited then your database will be compromised. I won't be broadcasting the IP address of my database because I won't be sending calls to it, which makes my ...


2

There is no way to transmit data wirelessly without being susceptible to trilateration (using the standard definition of "radio wireless"). That's why attempts to "transmit data without revealing your location" usually end up shifting to things like laser, infrared, or other visible light methods. These things tend to work well in directional applications, ...


2

Is this kind of activity normal in VPN providers? they are legally registered company, claim that respect privacy... That the domain names begin on dl. (short for "download") sounds like they are checking for updates, configuration files or whatever. That they do it every seconds seems like a waste with Resources, but I Think they do it that way ...


2

Some things to consider when dealing with TLS as a protocol. The payload of the communicating packet is encrypted. The 'dst' & 'src' packet attributes are not, which allows for any device within the network route to intercept your communication. Numerous attack against the SSL & TLS protocol over the years have allowed for the following attack ...


2

Wireless networks that do not ask for password sen data over the air unencrypted and anyone can : Scan your pc/phone to actively try to exploit a component in your hardware all data via http:// e.g cookies,downloads,images,passwords and email sent Do Arp Spoofing Additionally you can't even be sure that the Wi-fi network is legitimate. That's all i ...


2

The problem with what your asking for is that there isn't a 1 to 1 mapping of the OSI layer to actual implementations. The OSI layers are really conceptual more than physical. In reality, the demarcation between the various layers is very blurred, which makes it near impossible to implement a tool which can break things up and break them into specifric layer ...


2

Schroeder's comment to your question implies the answer: No. To get to your specific question, a malicious network can see only your network traffic. You can install something like Wireshark to see what traffic you are sending. That's what a network operator can see. But that's a conditional "no." There is software that will allow screen sharing, i.e. ...


1

Consumer grade routers are frequently more vulnerable than professional grade for the following key points: They usually only work through web or graphical interfaces, where errors strike at the speed of the click. The click being the one of the owner, of the cat or of the attacker. They usually have a web server embedded which is in itself a huge amount ...


1

How to detect if you are behind a PNAT: nping --ec "public" -c 1 echo.nmap.org (CAPT-labelled packet gives away the PNAT address) If you test the external side of the firewall, you could use the bnat modules from the Metasploit Framework in order to route traffic through the broken implementation of NAT. There is also a vulnerability in some firewalls ...


1

The NAT software running on the Firewall system is going to block all inward traffic that doesn't match a current egress session or a port forwarding rule. If no port forwarding rules are in place, then the server behind the NAT is as good as invisible, barring compromises to the firewall.


1

Any application can easily submit any DNS resolution request. There are numerous libraries available and programmers can choose to perform the resolutions whichever way they want. For example, in Python it's one line of code (maybe two) import dns.resolver answers = dns.resolver.query('dnspython.org', 'MX') To link an actual application to the UDP ...


1

You simply can not assume a program or script is safe solely on their imports. It is to easy to either combine functions or to abuse some 'safe' feature to do something unexpected (like using time queries to transmit data to a command and control server, or tricking the system to running curl with a payload of your data) The only way to know is to do a ...


1

Think of the scenarios of compromise. If you host the database on the same system as the web service, then a compromise of the web service results in immediate compromise of the database. So, this is minimally secure. If you host the database on an "internal" server that the web service can access (via an internally facing network interface or special ...


1

They cannot infer it from the technical analysis of their communication with you. All they see is TCP datagrams in IP packets, their characteristics shouldn't be impacted too much by your mode of connection (the MTU of the connection might be, but that's a pretty weak correlation).


1

This entirely depends on the infrastructure behind the wireless AP you are connected to. What can be seen more less: Phone Model, Location, Used Services, Used or In Usage Applications (such as application names), Bandwidth usage, Total amount of data spend per application.(both incoming and outgoing), Visited web sites(url list) and total amount of ...


1

I solve it for both WPA and WPA2 using MIC_SET, ACK and NONCE fields. MIC_SET | ACK | NONCE | Packet Number 0 | 1 | x | 1 1 | 0 | x | 2 1 | 1 | x | 3 1 | 0 | 0 | 4 Where with x I indicate that the NONCE has a value different of ...



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