Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

It's impossible to say. Assuming you don't have any ports forwarded to the PC and your router provides a DHCP server for your LAN, you aren't vulnerable to the classic attack vectors (CGI scripts on a webserver, a rogue DHCP server, or bypassing SSH command restrictions). However, bash is ubiquitous: you might be vulnerable to a program running something ...


4

Consider this command: nmap 127.0.0.1 -T4 -p 111 -sT -oG - | awk | awk '/^Host: .* Status:.*Up/ { print $2" UP" }' A common pattern using shell scripting is to use grepable output. Use the flags "-oG -", the final dash is to redirect output to stdout. Output from "-oG -" in this example outputs the following when I ran it at my own server: Host: ...


4

Rogue access points can certainly be dangerous, but there is a caveat: If the "real" network is encrypted, you cannot set up a rogue access point without knowing the key. Rogue access points must have exactly the same security settings as the original access points, including the same key. If they do not have the same key, clients will try to connect but ...


4

For many Linux browsers (I've tested Opera, Firefox, and Konqueror), this is normal: a bare / is an invalid URL (there's no protocol), and it gets interpreted as file:///: "display a directory listing of the root directory". There's no security risk here: only you can display the contents of your computer's root directory using a file: URL, you cannot ...


4

Just because the IP shows as Allocated unspecified does not mean you are being hacked. This IP status is because you asked the wrong entity, as ripe.net is not the responsible for allocating that IP. If you look at IANA IPv4 Address Space Registry, you would see that this IP range is managed by ARIN. If you ask arin.net, you would see that the IP is owned ...


3

We can understand your concerns. We do have the ability to ssh in to your router, yes, but access is limited to 4 people, and it is only done for trouble shooting purposes. The goal of BISmark is to enhance our understanding of broadband networks. We do not collect any personal (PII) information. We are simply not interested in it. We are interested in how ...


3

You are relying on "security through obscurity", and implementing this type of security is never a good idea. You can create a vastly more secure and easier solution by implementing SSL (or TLS) on your solution. Here is a very good tutorial on Stunnel: you install stunnel create custom certificates encrypt everything transparently Using stunnel you can ...


3

The security differences between an HTTP and HTTPS proxies varies depending on what you are routing through them: Clear text (ftp, telnet, HTTP): If the proxy is HTTP, the traffic is transmitted in clear text between your computer and the proxy, and clear text between the proxy and the final destination. If the proxy is HTTPS, the traffic is encrypted ...


3

As said before, anonymity is as very hard discipline to master. If you are fighting against someone determined enough to hunt you down, it only needs one slip to find you. This article shows who and what you are fighting. Result: you are hopeless. You mentioned masked MAC Address: forget MAC forging, please. A MAC address have nothing to do with anything ...


3

Edit: I totally missed the home network part. Purchasing a network tap in this situation would be overkill. In your case Snort or Suricata could work. You could specifically make rules to search the packets for strings that would indicate insecure communication. You could further tune it by removing all rules not pertinent to what you're looking for, ...


2

A firewall may work at different layers of the OSI model, going from layer 3 to layer 7 (depending on your firewall). Representing it in a diagram will require to set rules for each layer. I would represent the firewall and include a list of all enforced rules on each layer. Some examples could be: Layer 3: IP filtering Layer 4: port filtering (TCP/UDP) ...


2

Unfortunately your question is lacking some details, but I can give you some food for thought on this that will help put this in context. First of all there are different protocols that could be used for an attack such as ICMP, or UDP or TCP. Without knowing more about the target or type of traffic generated it's hard to truly predict what impact it would ...


2

In this case you may want to get a network tap or set up port mirroring if your router supports it. From there you can install an IPS (either manually make an image or use security onion). You might want a deployment style similar to below. However in your case the firewall will most likely be your internet modem and your LAN will be your router.: Or if ...


2

If you have some extra hardware around i recommend trying Security Onion. It has snorby and suricata already installed and can be run in a few different deployment styles (one machine, listening posts etc). Might be just enough information for you. You could of course also hub out your home network and tcpdump/wireshark your traffic and see.


2

Network Anonymity is largely how much you perceive yourself to be anonymous. While using a VPN and a layered-browsing method might seem to make you incredibly anonymous, ultimately your connectivity is passing through uncontrolled territory and could be monitored. Weaknesses of TOR can be found on the wikipedia site: ...


2

Probably somebody is calling you with voIP phones... you can make it seem as if you are calling from any number or even make it appear as is "xxx bank" or whatever. So no biggies on that part. It is very popular nowadays to call people from voIP systems with fake caller info. On your second question, being called from only known people... Look for a ...


2

The communication link between the application and the DB is the issue. If the application is what you consider your CDE then the database will be in scope because it is connected to the application. Depending on your access controls and other security controls for segmentation you might be able to remove the management portal from scope (assuming it sits on ...


1

Based on the link from Julian's answer, it's pretty straightforward. It does seem a little dangerous but nothing critical. how the web works Imagine you have a website. Browsers send HTTP traffic to that website. This traffic includes session cookies. The site should be TLS protected, or your session cookies are going over the internet in cleartext, for ...


1

Although I can't pretend to understand all the details of this, it does appear that this is dangerous. See the original post here. While superficially this may appear to be harmless, it does in fact allow an attacker to cheat the RFC2109 (HTTP State Management Mechanism) same origin restrictions, and therefore hijack state management data. The ...


1

Since access has been sufficiently restricted, the weakest link is the HTTP request. This is especially true based on comments regarding the poor interfaces of the IP cameras. They likely won't do well if irregular requests are sent. Therefore consider a Web Application Firewall (WAF) such as ModSecurity as it will provide more flexibility over what ...


1

I partipicate itself in a similiar internet test. Here, the device in question are put between the WAN port of your own router, and the internet, thus the measurement device would be "outside" your firewall and a owned measurement device would not give the hacker more abilities than direct access. I cannot tell if BISmark does advise the users to put the ...


1

Short answer: yes. Once someone has remote access to any node on your network, they could potentially reach out to the other nodes on the network.


1

If you always receive the calls from the very same person, then it might be a trojan on THEIR phone that calls you. However, if theres calls from multiple persons, then it might be the thing that people call "pocket calls", basically, the phone sits in pocket along with keys, wallets, and other objects that push buttons and/or touch touchscreen which in ...


1

I used something like this (powershell script) recently to determine simply if the server receives a response back. i know it's not nmap but it is quick and easy. $erroractionpreference = 'silentlycontinue' $import = import-csv 'config-network device.csv' $collection = $() foreach ($HostName in $import) { $status = @{ "ServerName" = ...


1

The information you do not understand how to interpret? like the WhoIS information? I think you should clarify that a bit more because I am not sure if maybe you are seeing an IPv6 address or something more specific like the information about that IP. In most all cases involving Facebook, Yes. The addresses are either logged into your account already. ...


1

If you see different IP addresses on Facebook, don't panic. Some of them are APIs from services you connected to Facebook, like Instagram. Some of them are services that use Facebook to authenticate you. If you are concerned about someone hacking into your Facebook, you should activate 2-way authentication. With this, you will be informed every time ...


1

I'm going out on a limb here and going to say you are talking about: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamachi_(software) Since its a publicly available VPN, connecting to a Hamachi network is a lot like connecting you your own LAN; except for the fact that EVERYONE on the Hamachi network you are connected to is unknown and can pose a very real threat to anyone ...


1

Just check the job sites and see what employers are asking for. My opinion -- seems like for Management type positions the CISSP is favored among others. For Analysts and Techs probably any cert that includes practical working knowledge (EC Council CEH) or lab components (Sans GIAC certs). How much money you have and are willing to spend on a certification ...


1

I would advise to start with Comptia Security Plus after you gain some information security experience you can opt for C|EH or advanced certifications like CISSP/CISA/CISM (Sans - Intermediate and above Certs). Sec+ ->CEH->CISSP/CISA/CISM or Sec+ ->GCIH/GCIA->CISSP/CISA/CISM You can opt for CISSP earlier in your career by taking the CISSP and if you pass ...


1

You are unable to see the rest of the network now because you have connected a router between and you are now basically on a 'separate' network --- check the IP addresses --- if they are not all in the same CLASS then you are on different networks and cannot see everything, although, technically everything is connected together. Secondly, a mac address is ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible