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0

It should also be noted that MAC addresses are not truly unique anyways. If you have a large enough network with the same NIC manufacturer there's a possibility you will get a natural collision. That obviously gives 16 777 215 possible unique MAC addresses per manufacturer. That's quite alot, so the manufacturer shouldn't re-use one. Some are lazy ...


3

As other pointed, you first need to snoop existing mac addresses (using wireshark) and spoof them. Except that : You probably will not get significant packets if you plug your device behind a switch (due to the way switches function). You probably will not get any packets at all if the MAC filtering function is provided by a switch that filters by MAC and ...


1

You can use Wireshark to eavesdrop authorized MAC addresses of the devices allowed to connect to that network. The MAC addresses of your device can be easily changed (An option in Network Settings). Note that lot of Linux distributions allow you to chance the MAC address and sometimes manufacturers do mistakes by assigning the same MAC address to two or ...


14

The easiest way would be to just spoof your MAC adress. Just listen to the network, watch which MAC adresses are able to connect and then give your own device the same MAC adress.


0

I normally use arpspoof from the dsniff package (https://packages.debian.org/stable/dsniff). This one sends out broadcasts automatically after you terminate spoofing, informing the target IP(s) of the real MAC address for the router. Normally ettercap has this functionality too (http://openmaniak.com/ettercap_arp.php) so this might be an issue with your ...


1

This problem also used to happen to me, and in my case, everything had to do with the use of iptables. I was using iptables without the (-i) interface parameter causing the redirection through my machine to not work, because iptables has no way to know which interface you need to redirect traffic to. I just changed my command and no more DoS on the network: ...


2

The reason other devices can see each other on the campus network is because all the clients are on the same "subnet" or area of the network, in which case there is no filtering. NetBIOS, Bonjour and other discovery services use the "broadcast" ip of the network to advertise the machine's presence. So, let's say the campus network internal range is ...


1

Network-connected devices are meant to talk to each other. That's why you connect them to a network. For proper network functionality, devices need to see each other, in order to agree on things like names, IP addresses, and routes. You should focus on endpoint security and protect the device(s). For example, you can set a password or require device ...


0

Virtualized Environment. Set up a series of virtual machines on virtual networks in a host that is in its own segmented network (VLAN, firewalls, no outward connections allowed, etc.). Run all your analysis in this environment. You connect by connecting to the host, then from there to the virtual machines. Even if malware runs rampant, you only risk the ...


0

Although another malware infected machine on your network that is being RAT'd by an attacker can not "just RAT you", it can still attempt to zero-day your machine to install the same malware to accomplish the RAT task. Zeus/SpyEye/Citadel etc malware and the like generally have proxy(SOCKS4-5)/RAT/ftp-backconnect capabilities as a standard, and they can ...


0

[IP Fragmented Packet] IP fragmentation attacks are rather old fashioned ones. Your logs show that an attacker has been attempting a denial-of-service (DoS) attack. Note that CheckPoint Firewall-1 was vulnerable to such attacks in its previous versions. [TCP- or UDP-based Port Scan] That is port scanning. In stealth mode, an attacker can scan the ...


3

IP Fragmented Packets are a form of evasion against network devices. It consists of submitting the payload through smaller pieces to make it more difficult for firewalls and IPS to identify the scan or even an attack. Networking scanning is pretty normal and you have to get prepared to it. Important is to have a firewall well configured in place, limit the ...


1

in psk authentication and 802.1x authentication methods, five main keys are generated. master session key,group master key,paired master key,paired transient key and group temporal key.paired transient key and group temporal key are generated after four way handshake. when you switch from one access point to another,the four way handshake starts again.


1

The easiest way to do this is by turning on the Promiscuous Mode of your network adapter and using a tool such as Wireshark or tcpdump to capture the traffic. This article explains how promiscuous mode works in general and what are some other alternatives to network monitoring. Here is an explanation is somewhat non-technical language (taken from the same ...


0

Really what you need is a method of working on something like office 365 or Google docs/drive for office type documents or github, or bit bucket for program files. This will allow you to have a consistent copy of what you are working on across locations.


1

The Good Practice Guide 13 (gpg13) recommends a number of controls for baseline protective monitoring and information security measures. Also have a look at the link belows for some network security good practice guidelines. These should provide a baseline to aim for. They will need to be tailored to your environment and compliance needs.You may want to ...


1

According to these slides, during the handshake both the operator and the SIM card uses A8, RAND, and Ki to generate a session key (Kc). After the operator compares RAND_1 and RAND_2, it uses Kc to encrypt a message. The mobile then tries to decrypt the encrypted message with Kc; if this decryption is successful, then the mobile had, in effect, ...


2

What you're seeing is the intended behavior. Clients won't be able to connect to your rogue AP as your AP isn't set up with the same PSK the real AP is, and clients shouldn't connect to a network that has the same name (SSID) but different security (unencrypted). To answer your question, no it is not possible. Even if you manage to set up such an AP (pretty ...


-1

This actually is a vulnerability, based on your question. An open port on a firewall is a point of entry into a system. Having a service attached doesn't prevent it from not being a vulnerability. Even if you are referring to a OS firewall, the application of a firewall, and the actually application of software are two separate risk profiles even if they ...


2

PART 1: Generic explanation, unnecessary to read if you have read the question. The first (how does the packet arrive at the attacker): Victim sends a packet with source IP '192.168.1.3' and source MAC '00:00:00:00:00:03' to destination IP 'DEST' and destination MAC '00:00:00:00:00:01'. Where 'DEST' is some external IP like '47.32.1.6' The router ...


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I believe they already have if this article is correct: http://community.skype.com/t5/Security-Privacy-Trust-and/How-to-protect-your-IP-from-skype-resolvers/td-p/3874291 Skype uses peer-to-peer instead of traditional client/server connections to make the calls happen though. Since there's no sole middleman the data needs to know where it's going between ...


1

Question #3 is much too open ended to answer. For the others, the answer depends on the router model in question and, in function of that, the exact meaning of "admin access". If the router is a Cisco IOS based device and you have privilege level 15 access you can use the regular packet sniffing commands of IOS which would certainly allow you to achieve ...


6

...would that be considered a security vulnerability? No since there is no application behind that port to be exploited. (This port is actually called closed) Do not mix up an unfiltered port with an open port. A unfiltered port is just a port which has no specific configuration (rule) in a firewall. It can still be either open or closed.


3

A port is open when a service is listening to it. A service processes data. And that is why open ports are interesting for an attacker in that they expose the vulnerabilities of the services that are listening to (using) them. As long as there is no service listening to a given port we can not talk about open ports and the risks associated to them (by ...


3

I originally made a comment on some answer, but I think that the person asking the question is confusing anonymity with IP spoofing, which are different beasts altogether, so I'll go into a bit more detail. In a typical environment, you can not spoof an IP address for an HTTP request, and this is because an HTTP request is running over the TCP stack. ...


3

When i read your question, TOR browser immediately came to my mind, the idea behind tor browser is "bouncing your communications around a distributed network of relays run by volunteers all around the world". this not only changes your IP address every a couple of minutes (please check specific timing in the browser), but with one click (onion button > new ...


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BEAST is a vulnerability on the client, not on the server. A server is not, and never has been, "vulnerable to BEAST". There is some confusion about tools that "test SSL servers", that may report a "BEAST vulnerability" if the server fails to fix a vulnerable clients -- namely, if the client is vulnerable, and specifies in its ClientHello that it prefers to ...


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There's a number of ways that you could achieve this As @raz says in comments use Tor. The Tor network is designed to anonymise Internet traffic so this would fit your bill quite well. Using something like Tails OS could be an easy way to get started for you in that line. As @zviad-gabroshvili says use a proxy. there are a wide range of proxy services ...


4

I cant create a comment, so this is my two cents. You can of course send a HTTP request under a different IP number (other than yourself, "anonymous"), using NMAP. But the one down side would be that you will never get your HTTP request back, because if the server responds it will respond to the spoofed IP address. Unless you set the IP address to some ...


6

If you are running Linux, you can install proxychains by opening terminal(Ctrl+Alt+T) and in terminal type sudo apt-get install proxychains and press Enter, second option you can use is that use http_proxy. Check proxy list here: http://proxylist.hidemyass.com/search-1299183#listable In terminal type: export http_proxy="http://x.x.x.x:port", press Enter. To ...


0

iptables, as the name suggests, works at the Internet Protocol layer (OSI: network layer) and could drop any incoming packet. But there are some ways of "talking" to that OS at the lower, link layer: You can ask it for the MAC address and that might tell you something about the hardware and in turn software running it. A Samsung OUI is more likely to be a ...


1

OS fingerprinting, as you described, uses the network traffic characteristics of the OS. Some utilities exist to alter the defaults in order to mask the type of OS you use. Dropping all incoming packets would work against fingerprinting attempts made by initiating new traffic from the outside, but not against fingerprinting attempts made by the destinations ...


0

If you plug your phone into your computer (to sync to iTunes) anything is possible. Incidentally, it's possible to send a signal from your computer to your phone with a special virus. This is very hard to accomplish, but since phones are often tethered, not inconceivable that this could be seen in the wild.


-1

It is possible, practical and dangerous! You can implement it by having a Raspberry Pi or Arduino to act as a modem, converting the digital bits into electromagnetic signals. Don't worry about the transmission range. Amplifying electromagnetic signals is not a big deal and doesn't request a lot of resources. Take a look at this example. Hackers were able to ...


6

Is it possible? Yes. Varying the electromagnetic noise of a device's circuits to transmit data has been used both in and out of laboratory settings. (For example, somebody figured out how to modulate the Raspberry Pi's GPIO pins to turn it into an FM radio transmitter, with the side effect of trashing a wide band of the radio spectrum.) Is it practical? ...


4

Sure, Powerline adapters have done this for years. For example the Belkin Surf POWERLINE NETWORKING ADAPTER employs 128-bit AES encryption.


0

Part I - How could Facebook find out your fake account? I tried to create an account through two different ways: My laptop by using Tor Browser - Result: No identity check nor references to my real Facebook account. VM using NAT, Firefox and VPN - Result: No identity check nor references to my real Facebook account. By reading your description ...


1

Actually I started to comment until I guessed my comment is too long ... anyway: Whatever the settings methods you used to deploy SOCKS5 that you mentioned in your comments to hide your IP, surely Facebook does not rely on IP addresses to identify its users because IP addresses could be the same if the users are, for instance, behind a corporate firewall, ...


-1

A couple of vectors that come to mind: You have not hidden your public IP (unless you are using Tor) Facebook probably has a cookie on your device, linking previous logins. In fact, the latter information is good enough to identify you pretty well.


2

If you choose to implement encryption at the physical layer, it might be because: Either you need for some reason to support anything which could compose the link layer 2, you want your encryption scheme to be independent and transparent to potentially unsecured upper layers. Some requirement make it unavoidable to work as close to the physical as ...


3

You could think of Quantum Cryptography as a form of cryptography at the physical level. Quantum Cryptography uses the properties of quantum mechanics to send messages that can't be intercepted by a 3rd party. It's not cryptography in the strictest sense, but it serves the same purpose of preventing 3rd parties from intercepting data. Of course, it ...


3

The job of physical layer is to transmit the data over some channel(cable or wireless medium). If encryption was done at the physical layer, then all the data, including the application data, the destination IP address, port number, different headers, etc. will be encrypted as well. When this encrypted data will be transmitted, the next node(router,switch, ...


1

The data link layer is the lowest layer where actual data is exchanged, the physical layer immediately below that is the mechanism for passing that data. You could insert an encryption layer in between your physical layer and your data link layer that flips bits on the wire in a manner that a device at the other end would be able to decode, but really all ...


0

Basically, he can TRY to attack you. This is usually worse than it sounds. Basically, he has the opportunity to exploit any outdated software, weak passwords (or default passwords - not many people change the password on their router), or bad ideas you might have. By default, your modem stops people outside your LAN from trying to do most of that (except for ...


3

The Modem is connected to my PC. What can he possibly do while he's on my internet? This is a very subjective question because it depends on some many things, but permit to build two scenarios. Best case: He checks his e-mails, read his favourite newspaper and nothing happens to you from a security perspective. Worst case: He has thousand of ...



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