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1

The short answer is yes, there are a variety of ways to achieve this, if I'm understanding your question correctly. A basic example would be that a user could set-up Team viewer on their home PC, then connect to it from anywhere in the world. they could then use VNC into the office over the Team Viewer connection and appear (from an IP address perspective) ...


2

Note, there is no legitimate reason to hide the algorithm used if you use a suitably strong passphrase/key. If you are really concerned, you could open the encrypted file in a hex editor and change the fourth byte of the symmetrically encrypted ASCII armored file. E.g., the first four bytes of an symmetric encrypted file are: 8C 0D 04 09 with the ...


2

It looks like the passphrase which was used to encrypt the message with is encrypted with AES256. The algorithm used to encrypt the message is self is not known until the encrypted session key packet is decrypted. This is what pgpdump shows: Old: Symmetric-Key Encrypted Session Key Packet(tag 3)(13 bytes) New version(4) Sym alg - AES with 256-bit key(sym ...


3

When you don't want the user to have access to your code, you must not let them run it on their machine. It's that simple. As you already found out yourself, obfuscation doesn't work. So what option do you have? Run it on your own servers and offer it to the customer as a service, for example via SOAP. The drawbacks are that you need to administrate ...



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