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The TLS_FALLBACK_SCSV draft RFC protects against any downgrade attack. When a client's first handshake attempt fails and it falls back to a lower TLS version (including but not limited to SSL 3), it will include the SCSV, and the server can know that the client wants to support a higher version but was prevented from doing so. If the server also supports a ...


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There are two commonly used formats: DER - binary; data is stored in ASN.1 structure PEM - text; basically it is base64-encoded PEM You can inspect them both for example with openssl asn1parse command or online decoder.


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Here's nice walkthrough of all the steps you need to do in order to generate self-signed ceritficate. http://www.akadia.com/services/ssh_test_certificate.html You are using wrong parameters. When you are generating new certificate, you've got two inputs - request and private key and one output - the signed certificate. The correct command therefore would ...


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By trusting the Root CA you're trusting their judgement in who they sign. As long as the intermediate CA is valid, not revoked, and you're trusting the Root CA... the chain will always be verified. Other applications (such as NSS) can add additional checks and functionality to provide this, but unless the application provides it it's not really part of the ...


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I don't think you could do this with the usual applications.. If you have your own application using the OpenSSL library you could handle this condition inside the certificate verify_callback. This callback is called on verification for each certificate in the trust chain and you can distrust the certificate by just returning 0. Note that this will cause ...


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As AJ Henderson suggested, the perfect solution would be to have the OpenPGP card sign the CSR. It turned out that is possible with the gpgsm CLI tool. Damien Goutte-Gattat from the GnuPG-user mailing list answered the question: Is there any way to create an X509 CSR signed with the private key stored on the card? Yes, you can use the ...


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AES-CTR-256 is only available since OpenSSL v1.0.1. It's possible to view the encoding ciphers by issueing the following command openssl enc help It will show all the available encoding ciphers. To check the current version of OpenSSL run the following command openssl version Note that the 0.9.8, 1.0.0 and 1.0.1 branches have been maintained in ...


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Disabling SSL3.0 is one of the ways of mitigating POODLE attack. The other way is to apply the TLS_FALLBACK_SCSV patch. There are downsides for TLS_FALLBACK_SCSV as well: Microsoft doesn't support it yet. A bug has been raised in this regard: https://connect.microsoft.com/IE/feedback/details/1002874/internet-explorer-should-send-tls-fallback-scsv Both the ...


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req -x509 (without -new) requires a CSR on input and you don't say anything about having created a CSR. -key requires a "private-key" file (which in the PKCS#1 CRT form which OpenSSL uses is really keypair) and you say you have that, although it would not normally use a .txt extension. -keyout and -nodes are useless when -key is input; they are for the case ...


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(I assume both the AES18 are typos for AES128.) Some early releases of OpenSSL 1.0.1 had a bug that caused a few of the new entries in the cipher table including this one to be selected incorrectly. Using patch e (Feb 2013) or later should fix it. (Or 1.0.2, just released a few weeks ago.) If interested you can see the issue by diffing ssl/s3_lib.c between ...



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