Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I think that you're asking how to generate a timestamp response as defined in timestamp-protocol: RFC3161, with openssl to generate and sign the response using a PKCS#11 (HSM in your case) as a TSA signer. I think that there is no native way to use PKCS#11with openssl to do this. (maybe with some plugin like: opensc pkcs11 engine for openssl). If you take ...


0

When you configure the HTTPS server, use ONLY Forward secrecy (e.g.: ECDHE-RSA-AES128-GCM-SHA256 and only allow TLS 1.2): Forward secrecy is designed to prevent the compromise of a long-term secret key from affecting the confidentiality of past conversations. With a simple Calomel SSL Validation Add-on to Firefox or Qualys SSL Labs server test you ...


1

If the attacker has the private key, they can fully impersonate you. They can perform MitM attacks on your traffic stream, they can redirect requests to your server in a manner undetectable to the client, and so on.


0

Its "only" the MITM problem. However, the attacker can't just decrypt your traffic, he can also modify it. For example, he could add a virus to the pdf, or add some pages/change some numbers. A csr isn't something that needs to be kept secret.


0

Added as an at-least-partial answer so I can format: Those files (in comment to @Steffen) do have an encoding difference. ServerGroupCertificate.cer has Subject containing Org and OrgUnit as PrintableString and CommonName as T61String aka TeletexString, and 12-Digit-Working.cer has Issuer the same, but 10-Digit-Broken.cer (which is also client_cert.pem) ...


1

Basically agreeeing but adding several points: Cipher suites are in the OpenSSL code (technically the library not the executable). Proper OpenSSL already implements nearly all the standard suites so there's nothing useful to add. However RedHat and AIUI also CentOS packages until about the end of 2013 excluded from the build all Elliptic Curve (ECC) ...


1

A fully updated system will still have insecure or weak cipher-suites enabled. You can run a tool such as TestSSLServer, written by Tomas Pornin which will give you a list of cipher suites that are vulnerable to BEAST and CRIME. After you have identified the specific set of insecure cipher suites that affect your system, you can disable them in Apache's ...


0

A cached and reused session with attacker-chosen key will only work to/via the attacker, since the legit peer who has been impersonated won't know this id and key. So this doesn't allow passive eavesdropping, it allows active impersonation (including MitM) to continue more efficiently once it has been started, just as it allows continued legitimate ...


1

GeoTrust (and RapidSSL) certs have two trust paths. There is a root cert for GeoTrust Global CA valid 2002-05-21 to 2022-05-21 and now widespread, and also a "bridge" cert for the same CA valid 2002-05-21 to 2018-08-21 chaining back to Equifax Secure Certificate Authority which as you saw is valid 1998-08-22 to 2018-08-22. See my (updated) answer to google ...


1

They will have to issue a new certificate before theirs becomes invalid. As long as they use the same private key to sign their new (root) certificate, your (longer valid) certificate will be accepted, as long as you trust their authority. The certificate validity is not based upon the certificate itself, but the signature of the private key. Using the ...


1

The RFC for CSRs - https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2986 - actually gives a different reason why the CSR is signed. It doesn't say anything about preventing the CSR being modified in transit, but says that it is to prevent someone requesting a certificate for a key that is not theirs (and says this is only a minor issue): " Note 2 - The signature on the ...


0

There are lot of strange things people doing wrong when using SSL. And while I've not seen this one it might be, that they are trying to use the serial number as 32 bit, which means a maximum value of 4294967296 (or 2147483648 is they use signed int). This would fit into your description where 10 digit is ok (at least if below 4294967296), but 12 digit is ...


1

Usually you can say that maintaining the OS' CA list is the responsibility of the admins of the client servers. Even if it weren't for your application, they should maintain that list, as long as there are applications that rely on it. If you have special requirements for the security of the https connection, you could run your own CA, and create a special ...


3

OpenSSL does not come with a list of trusted certificate agencies, it only has a default path where it looks for these CA. On Linux and *BSD this path is usually populated by the OS, often based on the list Mozilla uses in the Firefox browser. But, there is no such list on Windows, because OpenSSL can not deal with they way windows stores the certificates. ...


1

No, new versions of TLS have not removed cipher suites defined in older versions.1 Which version of TLS you use and which cipher suite you use are two linked but separate matters (you can't always use a new cipher suite in an old TLS version). OpenSSL is just listing which version the cipher suites were first added in. The PRF is mostly used for key ...


3

You can only use the ECDHE-RSA ciphers from that list if all you have is an RSA certificate. Same thing for ECDSA certificates, which only can be used with the ECHDE-ECDSA ciphers on that list. ECDH-* is fixed in the sense that your certificate contains the fixed public parameters for and key, which can be used for the key exchange. This certificate is then ...



Top 50 recent answers are included