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Yes, it can be done as (theoretically) every "computing device" is computationally equivalent to every other computing device. Look up the Church-Turing thesis if you are interested. However your question is grounded in practice and in this case the answer is "yes, but it would cost too much". Effort in virtualisation today aims at speeding up the virtual ...


8

Actually lorenzo's answer does not quite cut it. The Church-Turing thesis only provides us with a model of computing, it can't tell us anything about virtualization because it is not concerned with other aspects of a machine. But there is theoretical analysis for the ability of a machine to be virtualized by Popek et al: ...


3

Put an actual computer in a physical sandbox environment. The computer itself isn't a sandbox and don't virtualize anything. Need active directory? Put active directory in the sandbox environment. Do your tests, verify what has changed, review computer and network logs. This is more practical than building a sandboxed OS which limits normal hardware ...


1

...practical, to build a sandbox that's identical to an actual computer... test every file and program in a sandbox before it is used... I think this is the wrong question to ask. The real challenge is not to build a sandbox which behaves like a real computer, but one which behaves like a real computer used by the targeted user. Malware actually uses ...


1

Realistically, the risk reduction options available will most likely not be cost effective. Especially considering those servers may be upgraded within the year. Two options that come to mind are network segmentation and application white listing. Symantec has a nice guide entitled, "Windows Server 2003 Migration: A Guide to Effectively Mitigate Risks". ...


1

It is not the bits themselves that are insecure, but if an attacker was able to exploit a flaw in a setuid/setgid binary it would result in code execution under elevated privileges. So by reducing the number or binaries (and lines of code) that run with elevated privileges you are reducing the attack surface.



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