Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

The reason a software author would use suid/guid is because some program features require root access. Take for example ping utility. In order to do all that ICMP communication, a raw socket is needed. Opening a raw socket requires root privileges. So, the program is build as a suid/guid binary, it starts by opening the raw socket, and immediately after that ...


1

It is not the bits themselves that are insecure, but if an attacker was able to exploit a flaw in a setuid/setgid binary it would result in code execution under elevated privileges. So by reducing the number or binaries (and lines of code) that run with elevated privileges you are reducing the attack surface.


0

Does it make a difference to a virus scan which system it is being run on and what type of malware it's looking for? Not unless you include exotics. The problem boils down to if a product supports engines effectively scanning the target from the perspective of the intended environment. All malware we scan for exhibits some structure compatible with a ...


0

In short no, it does not matter for most cases, including unencrypted archives. Malware detectors snipe signatures, which are basically chunks of data. Unless the platform doesn't malform the data, you should be ok. That being said, theoretically, you may run into trouble with endianness if the AV doesn't interpret the data correctly. But in most cases the ...


4

"Average length of time that an announced vulnerability has widespread exploitation", T "Attractiveness of server as a target", A, on a qualitative scale of 1-5 (higher number representing more attractiveness). "Ease of exploitation", E, using the CVE score as a basis of common comparison (T/A) x E = N Considering that T is now considered to be measured ...



Top 50 recent answers are included