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If a machine is hijack by an hostile entity, then the attacker can gain full access to the hardware -- including every drive which is currently plugged in the machine. If the Linux drives are encrypted with a key that the Windows system never sees (which means that if you want to copy files from the Linux to the Windows, you have to do it from Linux, not ...


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So the quick answer to the jest of your question is yes, having multiple OS's partitioned separately is technically safer. However, you are not immune by any means! There are countless attacks and viruses/malware aimed at the firmware/bios/etc of the computer itself -well beyond/before your OS starts up. Additionally, even with FDE (full disk encryption) ...


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In general, restoring from a clean backup will wipe out any malware you have. However, there are rare exceptions. Malware can install itself in your computer's BIOS, in which case it will persist through anything but a BIOS flash (and if it can sabotage the flash process, it can survive even that). BIOS-infecting viruses are extremely rare, though, ...


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There is a way to do this via Google's Native Client. However, executables have to be compiled for this environment explicitely. It is difficult to achieve otherwise (i.e. without a sandbox). DEP can't do this for you, as it only prevents memory segments without the executable flag from being executed. Just think of reading the CPUID, which is a simple ...


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Hardware enforced DEP may be able to prevent, unsure about returning false values


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There are some theoretical risks (which have not been proven yet) that would make the dual-boot approach less secure. These involve offloading a trojan onto a non-standard piece of hardware. For instance, infecting the battery's firmware with something that will then overflow the kernel's power manager. That could cross reboot boundaries and you don't ...



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