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Not necessarily Operating systems in general and Android specifically, implement a privilege model to access data (When you install an app, you can decide which permissions you want to give it. You can also edit those permission later on). If an application is taken over by a malicious piece of code, it will have the same privilege level as the affected ...


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Most android malware will steal information or spam your phone with aggressive ads. But they do not necessarily modify any installed apps on the phone. If a phone is rooted, the malware can, however, uninstall apps and replace them with malicious app copies. The following link gives an overview of many of the known android malware capabilities. http://...


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As this page says: https://support.google.com/googleplay/answer/6014972?hl=en identity is mainly used to get your "contact card" which is obviously useful if the application want to automatically fill signature or sender friendly name. By following the link guideline to check the authorization: Using the Settings app on your device (for apps you've ...


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In Android, permissions are categorized into 2 categories: Normal permissions: Very little risk to user's privacy (like access to internet) Dangerous permissions: High risk to user's privacy (like reading and modifying contacts) Normal permissions are allowed at install time, and they won't be asked. If there are any dangerous permissions, then you will ...


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What you are asking about is known in the hacking world as "Privilege Escalation". It's a fairly broad term that encompasses a lot of techniques over a lot of operating systems and platforms, but is generally taken to mean exploiting a bug or flaw within a system to gain additional levels of access -generally administrative in nature. To my knowledge there ...



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