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2

Ask, and it shall be delivered: https://developer.android.com/reference/android/Manifest.permission.html All items on this very large list are arguments to <uses-permission> in the Android Manifest. It would also be helpful to read these as well: How permissions are used by the Android system: At application install time, permissions requested ...


2

Firstly, in iOS you can deny access to certain resources (when they're first requested by an App you receive a popup you can either accept or reject) and therefore Apps are designed to handle the scenario of access being rejected. You can also disable Internet access on an App by App basis, although you're not explicitly asked this ahead of time. Overall ...


0

Desktop apps are expected to do far more than mobile apps, so its much harder to give them fine grained permissions. In particular, desktop apps often communicate with each other, while mobile apps are usually very very very sandboxed to avoid such communication. If you allow interapplication communication, the fine grained privileges available are those ...


1

It's actually only Windows that doesn't have that. (Except appstore apps). On OS X you have to give permission before things like contacts can be accessed or if an application wants to do filesystem changes to anything outside the user's container. For Linux there are things like AppArmor an SELinux, but on most unices, bsd's an linuxes the normal ...


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There are at least two significant reasons why mobile operating systems have fine-grained permissions for apps, while desktop operating systems don't: History. Desktop operating systems date back several decades, when the primary threat model was different, and consequently have mechanisms designed to deal with that (now-largely-obsolete) threat model. ...


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Aside from the other reasons already stated, the risk profile is also higher on mobile phones for the phone manufacturer itself. Third party applications on phones can accumulate thousands of dollars of roaming/data/sms charges, they can impair the primary communication functionality of the phone, they can even prevent a phone from working during an ...


5

As a comparison point, take a look at firewall options on a smartphone vs a desktop OS - I think you will find that the desktop has much more fine-grained firewall options (excluding root firewall apps on android), allowing you to specify which executable has access to communications on which ports and on what networks, whereas it's nearly impossible to ...


39

There are two main reasons why smartphones have fine-grained permissions while desktop computers don't. History. Mainframe operating systems have a tradition of giving permissions to the user rather than to the program, and this carried over into minicomputers/workstations/desktops; the desire to maintain compatibility with existing programs limits the ...


17

For technical reasons it is not possible to tell which permissions an application needs until it tries to use them, which means that an application needs some way to declare this. Applications on desktop operating systems never did this. When the user starts a legacy application, you could only assume that it needs everything (training the user to accepting ...



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