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PGP signatures, like most modern signature schemes, are not deterministic: that is, signing the same message twice will not result in the same signature. To do this, a random nonce (number used once) is used. The nonce needs to LOOK random, but there is no way of guaranteeing that it is: you could encrypt some data you want to exfiltrate with a fixed key, ...


1

First of all, be aware that the Yubikey does not support ECC keys (but I don't read from your question that you assumed that). If you use an ECC primary key, others using older implementations of GnuPG not supporting ECC keys (thus, everything before GnuPG 2.1) will not be able to verify your primary key nor signatures issued by you, as it does not ...


5

Important note before I start: in OpenPGP, there is nobody telling you whom to trust. You have to perform this verification on your own, but there are tools (like certifications in the web of trust) that help you doing so. For the same reasons, I cannot provide you with a step-by-step tutorial on verifying a given OpenPGP key, but can only give some advice ...


2

First of all, I feel you are quite a mysterious person because no one could pretend to break 4096-bit RSA in the foreseeable future so I wonder why you need such a very long key. Coming back to your questions now: But in which operation is this the case? Generating the keys? Encryption? Decryption? Signing? Verifying? All of them? RSA keys are used ...


2

In the case of clear-signing, what is signed may not be exactly what you have typed. In order to be robust (RFC4880): lines starting with "-" are prefixed with "<SP>-" (to prevent misinterpretation) line endings, whatever they are, are replaced with <CR><LF> trailing whitespace is ignored In order to fulfill SMTP requirements ...


2

TL;DR: this is e-mail legacy. Neither GnuPG, nor Thunderbird, nor probably any other implementations of OpenPGP will bother about the line length. But the whole e-mail infrastructure does. E-Mail Legacy Historically, the limit to 78 characters (RFC 2822) came up because of the usual limitations of characters that fit on a screen per line. This is long ...


15

I can not make it simpler than this: Essentially, the trouble happens when Enigmail attaches an inline PGP signature to an email in Thunderbird's HTML message composer. The HTML composer is a different component than the plain-text composer, and it performs some "clean up" on the message body after the user hits send. That is an obvious recipe ...


1

In OpenPGP, signatures are used not only for documents, but also for certifications between primary keys with different levels of trust (sig, sig1, sig2, sig3; as hex codes 0x10-0x13 in this order) and several more internal stuff. Signatures are also very important for binding subkeys to primary keys (and the other way round): these are displayed as sbind ...


0

There is a pretty good write up about PGP at Wikipedia. According to the GPG manual (pgp for linux) under --check-sigs flag: The status of the verification is indicated by a flag directly following the "sig" tag... So, looking at that: Sig3 means that another user has personally checked the fingerprint or key. If it says Sig only the means ...



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