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Whether to use PGP/MIME or inline signatures is an per-account setting in Enigmail. To change this option, open the Account Settings, and for each account you want to use PGP/MIME check the Use PGP/MIME by default box.


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You set the level and limit of trust you have. PGP has two types of Trust: Implicit trust is when you sign someone's keys, period. It is usually published on various servers. Explicit trust means you trust keys the individual signed, to include people you've never met and is PRIVAT. If A met B and wanted to utilize a PGP suite, they'd have to sign each ...


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The default GnuPG trust model allows a maximum length of trust paths of five, which can be configured. From the official documentation: A key K is considered valid if it meets two conditions: it is signed by enough valid keys, meaning you have signed it personally, it has been signed by one fully trusted key, or it has been signed by ...


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To avoid the "not completely implemented" issue mentioned in Jens Erat's answer, use gpg --homedir on a temporary directory. You may need to modify the mktemp command based on your platform: gpg --homedir $( mktemp -d -t '' ) --import /tmp/somekey.asc


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There's two things encryption does: it makes interception of communications harder. Text sent in the clear is trivially easy to 'pick up' by anyone on the communication path you're using. If you 'have nothing to hide' then this may seem irrelevant, but bear in mind that there are plenty of unscrupulous types out there who are prepared to use personal ...


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Standardization Don't expect any clients to be able to read those user IDs. User IDs following the schema provided are not part of the standard and will very likely not be implemented. This is especially valid for providing mail addresses, which do have a formalized representation, including a mailto: prefix would break that. Arbitrary Strings are Allowed ...


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since it's known that the NSA infiltrated RSA and made their key generation algorithm weaker If you know that, then you know wrong. You are confusing two things which have no relation whatsoever: RSA, the asymmetric cryptographic algorithm. Dual_EC_DRBG, a PRNG algorithm of poor quality and amenable to backdooring. RSA can be used for asymmetric ...


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It's a chicken/egg problem. Few people have PGP installed, so nobody builds systems which expect people to be able and willing to use it. There are few systems which expect people to be able and willing to use PGP, so few people feel the need to install PGP. However, what you see quite frequently in the wild are authentication systems based on X.509 ...


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When a SSL/TLS client and server talk to each other, the client needs to know the server's public key. In some dedicated applications the client already knows it (hardcoded in the client); but the normal method is for the server to send the key as an X.509 certificate. However, it is conceivable to use another kind of vessel for the server's key, for ...


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This is explained on their security details page: Securely communicate with other email providers. Even your communication with non-ProtonMail users can be secure. We support sending encrypted communication to non-ProtonMail users via symmetric encryption. When you send an encrypted message to a non-ProtonMail user, they receive a link which ...


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Keep it simple. Sending signed mails with given, parseable format makes things rather complicated. If a user opts for encrypted mail, send him (all, including all other) mail encrypted, including password resets. Selbstauskunft.net (German language only), a service for sending requests to companies request information they store about you based on privacy ...


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Advantage of Using Subkeys Using subkeys has the main advantage that in case you have to revoke them, you're not losing all reputation in the web of trust do not have to exchange new keys with other participants you're communicating with. For example, if you stored your subkeys (and your public primary key, not your secret primary key!) on a mobile phone ...


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Usually when generating keyrings the program will generate both an encryption key and a signature key in the public keyring. If you run gpg --edit-key KEYID it will probably show usage: SC and usage: E for your key and subkey respectively.


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OpenPGP Signature Types for Revocations All OpenPGP signature packets and their meanings are described in RFC 4880, section 5.2 (signature packet), which is the resource you already seem to have found. The relevant signature types are 0x20, 0x28 and 0x30: 0x20: Key revocation signature The signature is calculated directly on the key being ...


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I would suggest using a live-Linux-system, that is completely readonly. I would suggest using a USB memory with a physical write-protect switch, that prevents any modifications to the system (here is one: http://www.amazon.com/Kanguru-Flashblu-4GB-Flash-Drive/dp/B0012WDFV6/ref=pd_sim_e_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=1XS70KSFXBNH0PFQF3T9 ). Some laptops have internal ...


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When you install the Linux OS, you have to assume that the software is the genuine one, free of backdoors. Linux distributions tend to use digital signature on packages; a digital signature does not guarantee absence of backdoor, but it prevents undetected alterations in transit: you know that the package you get is the one produced by the packager. Since ...



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