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Yes, after you revoke your key you can still decrypt messages sent to you encrypted with that key. Note that you are also able to decrypt messages sent to you with the revoked key after the revocation. In fact, even if people aren't supposed to use that key (GPG/Enigmail will not allow to use a revoked public key to encrypt a message to someone), many of ...


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I think https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/ is already doing that for password reset mails if we upload our PGP Public Key to our account. For password reset emails, they encrypt the message and the token using our Public Key and send to our email ID.


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Did you look at RSAKeyPairGenerator(doc)(source) from BouncyCastle? It generates an RSA keypair and encodes it. I bet you can create a keypair object, fill it with your values and call the encoding function to get a file gpg will accept. EDIT: So I've used openssl to generate an RSA keypair and export the values of its components: openssl genrsa -out ...


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Your approach seems reasonable; I'd add that the master key is also used for managing user IDs (which makes it important for maintaining trust in the web of trust). The idea behind having a single encryption key is the fact OpenPGP lacks a way to couple a given subkey to a device or user ID. For signing subkeys, on the other hand, this does not matter, an ...


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Although your question is quite broad, the best way to protect your Private PGP Key on your device is to simply follow basic Android Security features: Lock down developer options, including "Trust unknown sources" if they are turned on. Lock down individual permissions of each application that concerns you. Opt to pay for an app if it contains no ads. ...


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Yes, basically you're right: if you (or your mail client) do not specify yourself as somebody that should be able to decrypt the message, only the recipient will be able to read the message. Multiple encryption keys are possible But: who can read your data depends on whom it is encrypted for. For example, most mail clients will encrypt for everybody in the ...


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It's perfectly true. Encrypting an e-mail with someone public key, you get as output a ciphered text that you cannot decrypt yourself, this is the point of asymetric cryptography after all. There are many methods to keep the original text. keep it as clear-text encrypt it with your own public key (to keep confidentiality)


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You should play with GPG, your question will answer itself real quick. I recommend a GPG tool called Mailvelope which works with most web-based emails (gmail, hotmail, yahoo, etc). You can encrypt a message for multiple recipients, and as @Xaqq said, most clients will include the sender in the recipients list for exactly the reason you state. But if you ...


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Diti is almost right about the historical context, but the real historical reason is in the part he/she omitted. For quite some time, gpg used DSA keys by default, which can only be used for signing, and then had to attach an elGamal subkey (which can be used for encryption only) to get a fully functional key. For RSA, that isn't necessary, but it was kept ...



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