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4

1) Contact gmail, and ask them to shut down the gmail account that your customers would send their details to if they fall for the scam. 2) Notify all your customers that this is a scam, and they shouldn't reply to phishing emails like the one above. 3) Spend a bit of time and energy on finding out how/why this happene, and if possible who did it. E.g. a) ...


2

Phishing is mostly a social attack, i.e. you might setup up a site which looks like a trusted one (i.e. copy of Paypal), give it a hostname which might fool the user (e.g. https-paypal.encrypted.whatever) so that the URL and links look trustable, put it together with some story ("detected hacking attempt, needs verification..") in a mail and wait for ...


1

There are a few standard tests / questions to detect phishing: Most serious companies will never ask you for login data by email. Check if the URL is looking strange. (very long / with typo in main domain?) Check for HTTPS connection and look for certificate information and check this (click on the lock in the adress bar). Check if you can find a ...


2

Phishing is a way of getting credentials by manipulating the victim in some way to give his credentials. An example will be a fake login page. DNS spoofing is a method to alter the DNS information and bringing victim to your personalized server or not letting him access the website completely. It's one application is used in a variant of evil twin attack.


1

Of course, it is perfectly common and is a standard part of the feature set of all advanced modern-day commercial malware, and has been widespread since the first versions of ZeuS. The page visited via the legitimate URL is normally partially or completely modified on-the-fly. It is normally achieved by injecting into the browser process and hooking WinAPI ...


7

I have also come across rootkits that will intercept DNS requests, and return the correct results for utilities such as nslookup, but a different IP to browsers. Yet another possibility is malware modifying your /etc/hosts file (or the C:\Windows\System32\Drivers\Etc\Hosts file). I haven't seen that much lately, probably because it is too easy to detect and ...


29

There are several ways to achieve this: Malware working as a proxy or directly hooked into the browser (like with browser extensions) can change the content of the site itself, that is one will still visit the original site but the content will be changed in transit or gets changed inside the browser with script injection or similar. This kind of malware ...


0

I don't have a specific answer for you, but if you search for "Wordpress hacked" you will begin to get an idea of the scope of the problem you face. My anecdotal experience is that Wordpress plugins tend to be responsible for a lot of the hacking that goes on, so I would start by patching your software stack from the OS up to Wordpress plugins and then ...



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