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1

These scammers often scare people by disguising harmless elements (such as event log entries, firewall rules, etc) into evidence of compromise and malware. For example they could tell you to execute some commands or find in advanced system properties what looks like a random number but is actually an reference to some system component common on all systems, ...


0

The iPhone in its unjailbroken state is a highly secure platform, arguably one of the most secure. For the most part, you can’t get a drive-by download on iOS as easily as on a desktop due to the extremely good sand boxing it utilizes. Ironically, this strong sandbox model is what makes apps sharing data with each other (a perk Android users have enjoyed for ...


1

From the scenarion you describe, she rather has been a victim of a drive-by download attack that leads to installing -in most cases- adware or spyware but this attack can be even more dangerous depending on the malware that has been installed. This attack uses the browser vulnerabilities or the browser's plugins vulnerabilities using mainly malicious ...


-1

First of all, this was some sort of malware, not phishing. Phishing is successful only when you enter your credentials thinking you're on a legitimate site. Go to the Apple Store and install an antivirus for both of your iPhones. (Unfortunately I can't give suggestions here. Avast is the best-rated AV for Android devices; I don't know what is worth for ...


0

The Targeted Email Attacks tumblr page lists a collection of examples of targeted, malicious emails. Many of them are not necessarily phishing, but some are.


2

I don't think you will find a data set with the original mails, since they are usually too sensitive. But you will find lots of indicators how these mails look like or what they contain in the various reports: The APT28 report by Mandiant documents use of Excel documents with back door and use of links with domain names visually similar to trusted domains. ...


19

Since you didn't enter your second factor code from your phone, and since you didn't say that you received a text requesting the second factor, you should be safe. However, if you want to be sure that all bases are covered (or if you hadn't enabled 2 factor authentication), there are a few things to check to be sure that you haven't been compromised and ...


10

You're lucky: it's Windows-specific. First, I took the code, and went to jsbeautifier.org to beautify it: var stroke = "5556515E070B0A1005071024120D171005011C140116100D17014A0A0110"; function do193() { return ',"h'; }; function do112() { return ') { '; }; function do127() { return 'r xa'; }; function do88() { return '= 0;'; }; function ...



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