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10

The only issue is that you're leaking information, in this case, the user's email address. Since it's plaintext in the querystring, it's going to be stored by any logging that's occurring anywhere between the client and your server, potentially in bookmarks if the user bookmarks that page, if the URL is copied and stored or sent to anyone, etc. I'll ...


7

uniqid() should not be used for anything security related: This function does not create random nor unpredictable strings. This function must not be used for security purposes. Use a cryptographically secure random function/generator and cryptographically secure hash functions to create unpredictable secure IDs. Also, you should make your link a HTTPS ...


7

When you use a re-webber proxy (a website where you enter a URL and it shows you the content of that url in its own context), using TLS between you and the end-website becomes impossible, even when the proxy would want to provide it. When you enter https://google.com in the proxy you linked, you get redirected to ...


5

Assuming your server doesn't use any credentials besides system-level accounts and the MySQL password, there's one thing you need to protect: the swap file. Programs are supposed to take steps to prevent credentials from winding up in swap, but they don't always do so. There are some sensitive things in /dev and /proc (such as /dev/mem and /proc/kcore). ...


3

When you don't want the user to have access to your code, you must not let them run it on their machine. It's that simple. As you already found out yourself, obfuscation doesn't work. So what option do you have? Run it on your own servers and offer it to the customer as a service, for example via SOAP. The drawbacks are that you need to administrate ...


2

Seems that my comment did not make it here, so i'll post it as an answer: No, it is not a serious security concern. If your site has for example a blind sql injection vulnerability, this would make it easier to attack a specific user. It probably also makes it a lot easier to scrape your website for user profiles, if that is a concern of yours. But other ...


2

Yes. Any HTTP request that isn't protected by SSL/TLS/HTTPS is vulnerable to MitM attacks. Without the integrity that is provided by HTTPS, any component of the HTML served over HTTP is vulnerable to attack or modification by a man-in-the-middle. For instance, the form's action could be changed, so instead of the form being POSTed to your intended page, ...


2

There have been issues with filter_var when used with FILTER_VALIDATE_EMAIL in the past, however I cannot find any vulnerabilities with FILTER_VALIDATE_IP. Even though an IP address does not contain characters that have special meaning within HTML (e.g. <) or have characters that can break out of a database query (e.g. '), I would treat the value like ...


1

This sort of question has likely never been asked here before because it is more suitable for StackOverflow. There are easier and better ways to protect against SQL injection in Codeigniter - I strongly suggest you look at Query Binding (at the bottom of the linked page) or Active Records. Both of these will escape queries for you in a way that is much ...


1

The main concern I would have with your proposed method of generating card grid data is whether the resulting grid numbers are sufficiently random. Since you are running randomly generated data through a HMAC (which should be fine) but then also a "mathematical formula" it is possible that could bias the resulting numbers. If an attacker knows that certain ...


1

You seem to be engineering a lot of unnecessary complexity in...unless I've missed something. If you have 64 cells generate a 64 character sequence of crypto random digits and store it. Print your card from this. And check responses to challenges against it. It's really very similar to having a 64 character password and asking for a few characters from ...


1

uniqid() does not create a cryptographically secure hash, and sending sensitive data over plaintext channels such as email or http means that anyone in between can read them. Is this a problem? No, not really (with the exception stated in the last paragraph). The information you send out consists of the user's email address and a confirmation key. This is ...


1

I hate those kind of problems. There are so many places something could have happened. I think I would just double check my config files - always a good idea to have a copy of valid config files. I use a GIT based tool to version all of mine. Then you can easily spot any unknown changes and back them out. Then I would add the domain to IPTABLES and block ...


1

The best solution would be to use a local PHP server on a computer without Internet if you want to be safe. Download PHP, put this text in a .php file, COMMENT OUT ALL THE PARTS YOU DON'T UNDERSTAND YET, and run 'php -S localhost:80' (or even better, take this version I cleaned a little) Then just add 'echo $variable' to see what's going on, and uncomment ...


1

Using POST instead of URL parameters has zero benefit for security. POST data can be changed just like URL parameters. In fact, you must not trust any data coming from the user, be it a URL parameter, a POST parameter, a cookie, an HTTP header or whatever. Almost all input is under the user's control and can be anything they want. The key is to treat every ...



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