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4

Shielding can be used to some extent. A Faraday cage, an underground bunker... can do wonders. Usually, the power grid will suffer most from a solar flare, because it is all unshielded obsolete under-maintained hardware, stretched to the max and beyond by competing regulations and market forces, and more often than not plain incompetence. So you first ...


5

For finding a wireless camera, people have long used "bug detectors" to hunt for unwanted RF transmitters and other electronic devices that unintentionally emit RF. There is no reason they wouldn't find an actively broadcasting Wi-Fi device. For a wired device, use a tone generator and detector (often called a fox and hound.) Clip the fox to the first wire ...


2

Bob could sniff the traffic. Bob could search the house again. Bob could use lsof -i:49152 to check what program is running on this port if he can access the PC. Bob could ask Mallory if she's kidding because this is annoying


4

Interesting question. Theoretically a sophisticated attacker could place hidden cameras that can't be detected, but theoretically a competent defender has logs about everything to catch attackers trying to deploy any unwanted stuff. So in this case this boils down to how sophisticated an attacker Mallory is (as it's proven that Bob isn't a competent ...


1

Perhaps a physical device could be made to press keys on the keyboard faster than what a human hand can perform to generate an error which could be analyzed. Perhaps this error could be useful. No. You in fact can create such a device for about $2. Just connect an ATTiny45 and a few passives to your USB port and you can bit-bang USB over the GPIO pins. ...


0

Looking into keystroke delays is not the correct way to identify a keylogger. Use process Explorer and review the existing processes. http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896653.aspx select columns - process timeline identify which process is starting with the computer that may be rouge. They often will highlight in various colors process ...


1

Another answer to add to the chorus of "It won't work:" Its possible to create a keylogger that runs as the system user that simply acts as a separate daemon: a separate program that listens to all keypresses. Since the OS is ostensibly the first actor to "hear" a keypress and forwards that signal on to any listening program, any keylogger that doesn't ...



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