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There are a few more things you need to consider which may or may not effect what you desire to write. Firstly being is that real datacenters with SSAE16 certifications have in place controls and monitors which give a full accounting of all the goings on. Authentication and Authorization. When I go into my Tier 4 datacenter, I am required to use my ...


1

There's a lot of good general security practice information in the other answers, but as I've just been researching for myself the implementation of security in the HomePlug AV spec (used by the devices you mentioned, and many others), I thought I'd add a little more specific info not covered yet. First, there's no such thing as unencrypted data transfer ...


1

Keeping in mind that this is fiction, your scenario could work given some qualifications. Perhaps there was some major breakthrough that day in the study, so it was worth the risk to backup the data on demand.


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If you want a physical threat, you'd need something that would be a threat to data, but not people. Acid corroding the server stack, for example, might be better. Bob could trigger a backup in safety while racing against time to save what data he could before the server was irrecoverable.


3

A fire is a real threat in a datacenter, but it would certainly not be handled with an emergency data backup. Server Fault has some discussion about what to do in a fire; the consensus there was that as soon as it was identified as an actual fire, you press the emergency poweroff button and release the fire suppressant on your way out the door, and call the ...


12

Most things of importance placed in a data center have a sister installation in a physically separate data center, and if there was a reason to "fail over" from the live to the backup site, it's completely plausible that things like data shipping will occur as part of it. It also will result in a flurry of manual and semi-automatic administrative activity, ...


1

From a powered-on, locked computer you may be able to extract network information by routing it via a USB network card becoming the default gateway. More complex attacks become possible by leaving behind keyloggers, or time-activated devices acting as disks upon reboot or keyboards after user logon. Embedded wireless can be used to exfiltrate information, ...


1

Add the following to your controls: Collect all electronic devices at the door so that attackers can not photograph the document image on the computer display. Scan frequently for rogue wireless access points to thwart "man in the middle" MITM attacks. See HAK5 for their "rubber ducky." Inspect for keglogger devices. HAK5 did a segment on an evil laptop ...


4

Well, you're going to have to fix your boss's "trust issues." I know of a defense contractor that removes optical drives and fills USB ports with a glue gun. Classified information is on an isolated network with no outside access. But, the real thing they do is address the "trust issues." Their employees who work with classified data must have security ...


1

You can't. File permissions only affect the file itself, not its content. When the user can open the file with any program, they can also write it to another file which then won't inherit any permissions the original file had, so they can do with that file whatever they want. The only way would be to remove any physical methods from moving any data off the ...


3

The standard way of handling this is through segregation of duties. Basically, it means that you have a team that handles deployment that is completely separate from the team that handles deployment in production and that you have a separate team that perform auditing. Also, proper encryption of the database and key handling will help limit access to ...


1

There was a great talk about bypassing endpoint security with USB stick appearing to be an authorized device on DEFCON two years ago: here. There are many more, one being the issue of a USB multiplexer which can point to different things when it recognizes the USB device being plugged in (very interesting talk!) and another about fingerprinting USB stack.


1

If a USB port was available, any attack could potentially trick the computer into believing a small plug was a keyboard, making it possible to save and run scripts on the computer. They could also run a program on your computer by using the Autorun feature on your computer, although that feature could also be disabled. Practically anything can be done, but ...


40

Yes, there's a classic attack that involves incremental access. The attacker starts out with a blank key and a lighter (or candle, or similar). Before visiting the door, he uses the lighter to put a thin layer of soot on the top edge of the blank key. The attacker approaches the door, puts the key in, jiggles the key a bit, grumbles something about how the ...


-2

Yes. Continuing attempts at a lock do increase a lockpicker's chances of actually picking it. With each try they get a better feel for for how to place the anchors and rakes. If you're looking to deter the intruder you can set up a current with maybe 3 or more D cell batteries and (be careful about how many you use, you don't want to seriously injure ...


4

Your deadbolt's security does not seem nearly as important as the lack of monitoring on the door. Even the most braindead criminal will eventually realise the value of a bolt cutter, at which point the whole discussion becomes moot. If a particular layer of your security (usually the outer-most) is vulnerable when you can't afford for it to be you have two ...


11

As a former locksmith, I can provide a qualified "no" for you. It is not possible to incrementally pick a lock, especially if it is a standard pin-tumbler variety deadbolt (Kwikset, Schlage, Baldwin, etc.). One thing you can do to assure that the lock is 'reset' is to stick the key in it, then removed it - turning it isn't necessary. This will force any ...


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You choice of lock matters a surprising amount. There exist locks which have not been defeated through "covert" mechanisms (picking, pick guns, etc.) in the open literature. Abloy's disc detainer locks, and one other type (I think it was a plastic lock from a subsidiary of Kaba?) are two such locks. Replacing the lock may be a suitable recourse, if you're ...


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The answer to your question is yes, though whether this will ever actually help them is dependent on the lock and their 'skill'. With a typical (cylinder?) deadbolt repeated attempts can advance an impressioning attack with a key blank (see tylerl's answer for more detail), if using picking tools the extra visits will improve the feel for the lock and in ...



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