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22

Just wanted to chime in and say that the list you have there isn't entirely 100% accurate, but it is close. Keep in mind that this will vary per MDM vendor and mobile OS, but MobileIron can see your location if your employer enables the functionality and you choose to accept sharing your location data. How exactly is this done? They just configure ...


15

Is it reasonable to say, any server that I request data from, regardless if I am behind tor, VPN, ect, can in fact, find my source IP contained within the header of the Datagram, and thus, know the true origin of the request. No on IPv4. A virtual private network works by connecting, between you and the VPN provider, a tunnel such that you can route ...


10

My company is currently going through the process of implementing an MDM for all work phones... So perhaps something that I can help with. The company will install profiles and policies onto the mobile device which (On top of what you have outlined above in image) can enforce the following: Constant VPN connection (Ability to intercept network traffic to ...


7

VPNs do not mask your identity and even BTGuard doesn't suggest that it does. VPNs encrypt your traffic to them. This hides the content of your traffic along that link only. This is good and it is one brick in the wall. A proxy is the other important factor. BTGuard, for instance, offers a proxy service for anonymity. A proxy takes your traffic and ...


7

It is not possible to create a digital communication that will self-destruct after a certain amount of time (or upon sender's command). This because of the nature of the message, which once reaches the recipient' machine can be copied at will. This applies to email as well as instant messages. Therefore any service promising you messages that ...


4

According to scuzzy-delta, yes: It is possible to detect that someone on your network is using Tor (e.g. You're a network administrator at a workplace, and an employee is using it), and the fact that you're using it is in itself interesting information. His answer: http://security.stackexchange.com/a/27848/76663 Using a bridged TOR connection is a ...


4

I just put some opinions from this link: If they wanted to include backdoors in VirtualBox, they would've closed the source a long time ago. Why would they spend time implementing a backdoor in open-source software that, if ever detected, would pretty much lead to everyone abandoning the software en masse? Leaving it open allows potentially thousands of ...


4

Use the company phone for business and keep things separate. Only an optimistic and idealistic person would hope or expect that you will not encounter any issues going forwards. Sometimes you need to keep things separate, this is one of those times, who knows what the future will hold and what kind of situation you might find yourself in where data on one ...


4

Your employer will "supervise" the device by connecting it to a computer running Apple Configurator which will restore it and apply a configuration profile with a certificate in it. That will allow them to push more profiles to your device remotely, and these profiles may include other certificates that can be used to intercept secure connections from your ...


4

From a security stand point, you will generally prefer to have your own device. This just keeps everything separate. Even if you backup your phone and all your data, it is probably better to keep it separate. This also assume that the company permits by policy and by technical controls the ability for you to independently backup your device. You also run the ...


3

There's plenty of apps out there to [...] figure out the password. Well, yeah, those are dictionary attacks. It doesn't matter if you're using AES-256 or FOOBAR-1024, if you choose a weak password it can be broken easily. The only thing that helps slightly against dictionary attacks is using an expensive key derivation function. From a comment on the ...


2

For USB, SDcard, and other one-off external filesystems, I typically prefer using GPG in symmetric (-c ) mode. The GnuPG code is well designed for this purpose. For Operating systems, in particular Windows, Linux/BSD, and OS X -- I am very careful to use a SED instead of (or in addition to) software-based filesystems and secure-boot protections. Mobile ...


2

Several proxies add extra headers to a session which leaks info such as the X-Forwarded-For header which includes the origin IP address. Since OP question states there is no GPS/GSM network involved, then one can assume this is running on a desktop, laptop, or WiFi tablet, therefore the location data is likely being acquired by geoip data related to the IP ...


2

This answer and this other answer might be relevant for you. In particular, quoting from this wikipedia page The most common sources of location information are IP address, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth MAC address, radio-frequency identification (RFID), Wi-Fi connection location, or device Global Positioning System (GPS) and GSM/CDMA cell IDs. The location ...


2

Hiding the originating IP can also help protect against attackers / phishing attackers that gain knowledge of the internal network of companies by getting the ip's of employees from the 'auto' mail replies. But I believe the main reasoning is privacy.


2

What is your threat model ? Why do you want to use the VPN ? You seem to think that a VPN is the silver bullet for privacy (thanks to all these ads to fool naive users, even though these VPN providers will probably be the first ones to hand over your data in case of a government/attorney request). Sorry to disappoint you, it is not. All the VPN does is ...


1

Even if it may sound counter-intuitive, self-destructing email actually works. The trick is that the email itself will actually not convey any useful data, but only something referencing the actual data to be shown which is safely stored in the service provider server. For instance the most trivial transparent implementation would be to transform the email ...


1

If the VPN doesn't alter the headers of your browser requests, then it's possible to identify your browser because of its fingerprint (you can test it with Panopticlick) or supercookies. Your personal identity is not revealed, but it's theoretically possible to find which pages you (more precisely your computer) visited by looking at the server logs. It can ...


1

You are correct saying you can be identified. Please have a check at the FREAK vulnerability : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FREAK I would say it's possible to get caught doing something bad / confidential even with a VPN. A couple other backdoor may still be present, or introduced in encryption technologies.


1

The answer is TMSI generation in real systems is weak and hence it cannot protect from tracking. There is an excellent research done which answers your question. Here is the paper and here is the presentation slides. Here is an executive summary from that paper. Pesudonym (TMSI) changing mechanism impletented in realtime networks is flawed, and hence ...


1

You can check network packets against public Tor node list (for example https://torstatus.blutmagie.de/) using WireShark or any other packet sniffing software.


1

If you can not trust your virtualisation software, you're in deep trouble. The virtualisation software can do *anything it wants) to the virtualised code (due to direct memory manipulation) but this is at the level of "Hey, can someone steal my creditcard data even if I encrypted it from memory when the memory is full of measurement probes?" (a.k.a. you ...


1

Tor provides you anonymity, but it will not protect you at all from malwares or any other security threats. All recommendation regarding network security must therefore be scrupulously respected in order to ensure your network safety. You do not mention it in your description, but be aware that your setup matches Whonix project, so if you do not want to ...


1

Todays used fingerprints mostly rely on generating as much entropy as possible by exploiting as much details of the browser as they can. Even subtle, but short term stable details, like the exact (hardware and driver version dependent) rendering on a canvas is exploited. The information gathered is most likely compressed by generating a long enough hash ...


1

Finally busting the NoScript Scam. Or as it were. It's long been time your question was raised on the 'net. To start off getting into answers, let's just take one of these surrogates allegedly meant to keep sites working the way "you" want and see what it does. I'm picking one at random - "noscript.surrogate.adriver.sources" (of course, that's "Ad River", ...


1

Am I just running around and is there a better way to do this or is this not going to accomplish a private email account anyway? It's not going to accomplish privacy from the prying eyes of major governments for a very simple reason: the e-mails sent to your company can be read from the sender's outbox (perhaps even while they are being composed!). ...


1

People have hinted around the possibilities of what a known MAC hardware address can deprive a device of. Two very real uses that I have researched and written programs to do: one, if your address is spoofed on another computer packet sniffing becomes very easy (obtaining usernames, passwords... just about every keystroke); two, you could plant packets or ...



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