Hot answers tagged

54

There are a lot of advantages. Here are some: Auto-completion of previously visited URLs you forgot, which can speed up the web surfing process tremendously. You might have remembered parts of a URL or website title, and your browser can usually pick those up if you typed them in. I love this feature. This can offer extra security. As mentioned by ...


48

Essentially, it doesn't. DNS servers let your computer look up where websites and other services are based on friendly names, by converting those to IP addresses. Your ISP provides this as a service, but knows precisely who you are, and what IP your computer has, so can easily look up to see that @user1 has made a request to look at google.com. A third ...


17

I agree with RobM. So it would be possible that they share everything they know about me with (american) governmental organizations. Yes, very possible. Are there even alternative browsers which wouldn't do this? The Onion Router. There may be others. Even Firefox will work this way if you use local syncing, and disable malware and phishing ...


12

The HTML standard is that unvisited links and previously-visited links are styled differently. By default in most browsers, an unvisited link is blue and a visited link is pink, but nearly every web page these days overrides that. In order to do this, you have to have a list of previously visited links so that you know what style to use for every link on ...


7

One obvious answer is when the website contains applications that you can download - it can then offer the content appropriate for your operating system. If I go to www.videolan.org with Javascript turned off, the download link goes to the Windows binary, but if I turn Javascript on, it goes to the appropriate binary for the system I'm actually using.


7

TL;DR: Change your passwords Enable two-factor authentication to prevent attackers from changing your password Warn your sysadmin You should change your passwords ASAP. From a machine that you trust. What good is it going to do that the attacker can still log in too? What if they find a way to change the password, too? Any suspicious activity should ...


7

He was using the blanket to fool visual recording devices attempting to steal his password, even though with modern technology x-ray or thermal imaging could effectively 'see through' the blanket.


7

To me, trustworthiness doesn't necessarily require a claim that an organisation will never disclose your details. Rather it means that any claims made should be honest. As a business, Firefox can be compelled by the governments of any countries it operates in to conform with their laws. An organisation that acknowledges this and clearly explains their ...


6

This probably has nothing to do with the IP address used for streaming. Many swatting events are based off of caller-ID spoofed Voice over IP calls using the home phone number of the victim and directed to the local 911 service or it's equivalent near where the victim lives. When these calls reach the local 911 dispatchers a database correlating the ...


6

Because it fits the majority Surveys (e.g. http://www.aleecia.com/authors-drafts/tprc-behav-AV.pdf) show that something like ~25% of people have ever used incognito mode and ~50% of people have ever cleared browser history. Needless to say, many of them don't do that all the time, so at any given moment a majority of users prefer to use a mode that does ...


6

How trustworthy? Good enough for most purposes, and better than using the same password everywhere. Your data is encrypted Your Firefox Sync data is encrypted, and the encryption key remains on devices you control. Mozilla's servers only see the encrypted data and do not have access to the key. If they were hacked or served a government order, it is only ...


5

DNS/Internet service providers may collect information about the traffic that you request, for internal auditing or to sell. One example from 2015 is that AT&T offered data privacy for a price By using private DNS servers the request for traffic will go through a trusted channel, still use the ISP infrastructure but not their resolution service.


5

Security is defined as the state of a system in which confidentiality, integrity and availability of data is granted. Privacy is the ability of a natural person to control the distribution of his or her personal information. If you are using for example a system of a big company - let's call it Oogle - it might be that their system is pretty secure, but ...


4

First of all, I would change my password. Secondly, if at all possible, turn on two-factor authentication of some kind, so that you will be able to reset your password if someone should get access again, and actually change your password (is this possible with Hotmail? I know GMail supports it). You definitely don't want to be locked out of your own ...


4

It depends on how you copy them. If you do a bitwise copy, aka exactly replicating every single bit from one disk to the other, you are copying over "slack space" which is where the recovery tool will work. If you do a file copy, then the empty space of the disk is ignored, and only the segments of data attached to a file header will copy over. The ...


4

Sensitivity of data is determined by the data owner who is responsible for classifying the information and also liable in case the information gets compromised. So no matter if data is used by human resources department or marketing, the classification will stay the same. The relevant metric for estimating the sensitivity is closely related to the cost of ...


3

I believe that you are asking if a side-channel can be used to extract information from encrypted communications without breaking the encryption. Specifically, can detecting the number of ongoing communication channels provide you with information? The answer is absolutely. Note that I don't know how UK police radios work or whether what you propose is ...


3

Metadata can potentially provide information that an attacker would find valuable. For example, the author value can reveal the organization's username convention, which could be later used in conjunction with password guessing or social engineering. The software used to create the file can also be potentially usable for an attacker if the target is using ...


3

The Honest Truth Answer: Unless you physically destroy the drive by putting it through a metal shredder, there is no way to completely prevent that information from having a chance to be recovered by a skillful individual. If government level actors factor into your threat model, then you need to physically destroy the drive. The Good Enough Answer: ...


3

There are so many incorrect tinfoil hat solutions here. Allow me to present a correct tinfoil hat solution that fits into your "without formatting" requirements. Even magnetic force microscopy isn't going to get the files back if they've been deleted properly. Burning the drive is an extreme tinfoil hat option that is completely unnecessary. Taking Your ...


3

Building on @AdHominem's good answer, I would add that your organization should have a security policy that clearly lays out your information classification guidelines. It's common to define three or four levels, such as "public", "internal", "confidential", and "sensitive". With each level, the policy should state very clearly what can happen with ...


2

A new enters his emailinto a form, which causes hash(email) + publicencrypt(email) + random nonce + timestamp to be stored representing the user and the user is sent a mail containing an URL with parameters random nonce and email. (As there is only (protected) email and not (unprotected) username plus (protected) password, things like salt ...


2

It does not stop them from seeing your activity, it really does not. private DNS or not you will still be visible, you would need extra layers to ensure your privacy, but it does allow you to skip government rules. if anyone wanted to they could easily see who you are, you still use your public IP dont think doing this hides who you are.


2

Skype is definitely not a safe client to use. A Google search of "Skype exploit" will reveal a lot of its problems in regards to exploits and various news articles provide information on how the NSA uses Skype as part of its Prism program (e.g. ...


2

Typically, if you know ahead of time that you're going to want to revisit a page in the future, you'd add it to your favourites/bookmarks. The history feature is there for when you suddenly realise you want to revisit a page you were on yesterday / a week ago / a month ago. It is too late to turn the feature on. Yes, from a security perspective it seems ...


2

Exiftool is excellent at viewing/editing document metadata. It's also multi-platform -http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/~phil/exiftool/ You can run it with the recursive switch so it can process all files in the current directory and all subdirectories. You could even write a bat one liner so it will be a set and forget operation to cleanse all metadata in the ...


2

Is this a security benefit It serves no real security purpose, but it serves a privacy purpose. By blocking the referrer then the sites you visit will not know what site you were previously on (maybe my visit to a clothing website was due to a link I found on a deviant sexual forum discussing how the clothing company has a sale on?). A lot of ...


1

They "technically" work by providing the company name and address to the whois database instead of yours. That's it. The main advantage is that you don't get your domain revoked for providing bogus information. And you can still be contacted through the registration company where needed.


1

Laws on computer surveillance are derived from laws regarding telephone surveillance and wiretapping. Those laws don't always fit the current situation, and the laws have not kept up with rapidly changing technology. So there are lots of holes in regulation and privacy law. One important concept is the "expectation of privacy," where a reasonable person ...


1

Almost all web browsers implement caching, so they technically have to manage a list of what is in the cache anyway. While the history feature nowadays might be implemented separately, and while you could build a cache that does not make deriving a history from it without analysing the cached content trivial (by using hashes instead of URLs as cache keys), ...



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