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182

Be careful about assuming too much. You say that you know "surefire" that your university is spying on you, but your only evidence is that your mom is computer illiterate and you're "sure some of them know more than they should" about you (WARNING - this is a red flag for those of us not in your situation, you do indeed sound extremely paranoid). If you ...


82

One possibility that I came across by accident: Google (and possibly other search engines), keep track of what you search for, if you are logged in. Anyone with (access to) your login name and password can access your search history. This includes any computer you logged in to Google on (e.g. if you accessed your Gmail from your mother's computer). I do ...


75

This sounds like it would mostly likely be some kind of Internet monitoring software (a.k.a legal spyware) installed on your computer when you set it up. Some ISPs provide this kind of service either network blocking or device monitoring (e..g this article from the UK). From the statement that they can view HTTPS connections, we can rule out just standard ...


24

Sorry if I'm stating the obvious, but: Why don't you ask your mother how she's doing it? Or someone at the uni, if your mom is not cooperative? Or, if you receive support from a social worker, ask him/her? Or, if all the above fails, a sufficiently trusted computer-literate friend who can gain access to your computer (if the monitoring is device-based) or ...


10

Was your computer supplied by the university, or using a university OS image, or custom network access software? You mentioned you're not using the university network, however if you have their network monitoring software installed, then they still could see your history. It's unlikely to be your ISP. They don't typically have the resources, or inclination ...


9

First thought that came into my mind is shared browser user, maybe you have used computer at home with your account, and then did not sign out? For example, if you use Chrome, all your browser history is being synced between all of your devices, including your moms computer. You could use a different browser, and some kind of VPN to ensure that your traffic ...


9

Very good question. Metadata is insanely powerful, and most people just don't realize how powerful it can be. Fortunately, it's not that hard to discover if you do a little digging into how technology and the internet works. I'm of the opinion that it's not very easy to hide online. In most cases, if you're a small fry, nobody's going to pay attention to ...


8

Is Windows 10 Leaking my IP Address? Almost everything is leaking your IP address. I'm going to avoid telling you your IP address isn't secret. You seem to already know that. Instead, I'm going to tell you what you're looking for: Yes, Windows 10 leaks information about your IP address ten over a hundred times until Sunday, even if you're behind a proxy! ...


7

Since your IP address is essentially the internet equivalent of your postal address and since it is required for routing your request (and especially the response) over the internet, any website that you connect to will have access to it. Any email server you connect to will have access to it, etc. Every time you connect to another computer, that computer ...


5

The problem with this approach is that the same identity is used by every destination, so sites can swap notes to see where you've been and draw correlations that you may not want to expose. There are several ways to solve this issue, such as the one used in the FIDO U2F security key. In this case, the device contains a symmetric key (not an asymmetric key ...


5

Google has some servers (Edge Nodes) located into ISPs for quicker response, this is what they call the Google Global Cache. They are basically big proxy caches for serving static content (such as YouTube videos). According to their FAQ, it is «designed for end-user networks with greater than 1Gbps of peak Google traffic» As you have observed, Alaska ...


4

I'm going to answer just one aspect of this problem: browser identification. Your browser is a great source to identify you. You can test and see how unique your browser is using EFF anopticlick. I just did that test, and while my browser is pretty good at fighting off trackers, it can be uniquely identified: your browser has a unique fingerprint Your ...


4

You could use Tor, or maybe simply a VPN, for no more time than necessary to find out if she still knows what you've been browsing. If positive, you have determined that your computer is compromised. Now: Make sure there are no weird pieces attached to it (there are hardware keyloggers). Format your hard drive and do a clean install of the operating system ...


4

Others have mentioned shared profiles, known passwords, and google history, and the ways to resolve those. But even more likely is: what do you get if you google your name, plus the word "youtube"? Do you get the videos she mentioned, because those are the ones you have commented on using your account? That is to say - perhaps she is not spying on you, ...


3

She pays for your internet. Many providers offer plans "for kids" with parental control, including full reports of visited resources. Using those is the easiest and most obvious option for computer-illiterate person. Changing PC or other hardware won't help of course as long as you use same internet access. If your PC is free of non-standard security ...


3

I say that you haven't given us enough information to identify how this is done. Your mother's lack of technical literacy may not matter much as long as she knows somebody (or knows somebody who knows somebody) who was willing to lend a hand getting a solution installed. Perhaps, also, it's not your mother who is spying on you, but someone else (with more ...


3

If you want to be sure that you are safe, reinstall your operating system from a clean (stock) image. Then turn on 2-factor authetication for all possible services (Google, Facebook) and change all passwords (including your mailbox password). Against network traffic spying you have to use VPN connection - it encrypts traffic from your computer to the VPN ...


3

There were several facts which can be used for testing anonymity. In general you could check it out by the following Set two email accounts send the email to another account ,verify the ip address. Your Browser might reveal some sensitive info,check it out here Use network analysis tools like wireshark and you could analyze the packets for anonymity If ...


2

It doesn't make any difference with or without SIM card. Briefly said, by sending email you will leave some traces. Some email services will send your IP address. (X-Originating-IP) Here you can analyze email header, it's useful to understand what's happening in background. https://mxtoolbox.com/EmailHeaders.aspx


2

As long as Bob keeps his private key secret you can simply encrypt everything which only Bob should see with Bobs public key. This also includes the signature, i.e. when sending a mail from Alice to Bob: encrypt the mail with Bobs public key make a detached signature for this mail using Alice private key encrypt this detached signature using Bobs public ...


2

What steps should I take next to protect myself in case? If you're really concerned that someone might be using your google account on a different Chrome (which would result in Chrome syncing their autofills to your Chrome), make sure you have 2-Factor Authentication enabled for your Google account. You can also set a "Sync Pass-phrase" for your Chrome ...


2

First: privacy and the level of privacy someone wants to achieve is a very individual thing. Second: That said, it is difficult to explain to some people why they should care much, but what I found worked for me is following analogy: You lock the door to your appartment - totally independend of weither you have valuables in there or not. You also never ...


2

Note: this question might have been better on the Tor community despite being on-topic here. Thomas Roth demonstrated that Protonmail was vulnerable to a Cross-site scripting (XSS) attack. The video (Vimeo) he made shows that at least the mail body was vulnerable to Javascript injection. As soon as the receiver read the mail, the code is executed. ...


2

The ISP sees everything as it is, the connection is only safe between you and the VPN. As you mentioned, this VPN allows you to browse on insecure networks, public wifi hotspots with safety, defends against eavesdropping and MITM, so still good to have. There are no other solutions. If you try to communicate with a website with or without VPN that only ...


2

Using the same private key across separate domains is basically secure. If you authenticate to a system, you don't give away you private key, and that system cannot impersonate you. So you can use your key across work and personal systems, and a work system cannot then access your personal systems. However, there are often reasons to use different keys. For ...


2

Have you read Google's TOS and PP? It says they will divulge any information they deem necessary to comply with any enforceable legal request. **We will share personal information with companies, organizations or individuals outside of Google if we have a good-faith belief that access, use, preservation or disclosure of the information is reasonably ...


1

That's not the problem. Some people use VPNs for privacy (which is arguably misguided, as a VPN is a remote network connectivity tool and not a privacy tool, but that's an argument for another day) and having DNS queries leak out of the non-VPN connection is a concern in that scenario. Say, for example, I live in an oppressive regime with little regard for ...


1

Generally, no. Your computer should not be reachable from outside your local network, with the name or without. However, it can leak info like your real name, or allow people who know your computer name to match your online username to the real you. Whether this is a major concern is up to you.


1

None of these answers are actually answering the question, and nobody is mentioning the power behind meta data. Let's go into detail as to how this can be done. How can you be caught using Private VPN when there's no logs about who you are? Generally speaking, there are logs about who you are, even if your VPN provider isn't logging anything about ...


1

You used a VPN. You hoped that the effect would be that you could hide your location and IP. There are lots of ways that websites can determine your real IP, and they are not considered hacking. What you need to do is to harden your setup to make it harder for these "de-anonymizing" techniques to work.



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