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62

Don't worry about it, those are things that any website you visit can obtain. The OS and browser info might help them develop a more targeted attack, but as long as your home firewall is secured these are likely empty threats. They could target a botnet at you to DDoS your connection, but many ISPs will notice this traffic and might block as much as ...


43

That is exactly what encryption is designed to safely enable. If Bob and Alice could safely share the message without allowing attackers and eavesdroppers access to it, they would not, in fact, need encryption at all. So, yes, it is safe to allow any and everyone access to the ciphertext. You do want to authenticate it so that it cannot be tampered with ...


31

All of the information he presented is part of the user-agent presented by your browser, example: "Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; Trident/4.0; SLCC2; .NET CLR 2.0.50727; .NET CLR 3.5.30729; .NET CLR 3.0.30729; Media Center PC 6.0; .NET4.0C; .NET4.0E; InfoPath.3)" This does not necessarily indicate either a high level of ...


28

The email includes references to an externally-hosted images, like http://example.com/[tracking_id].png, where the tracking company controls the server hosting the image. The company records how and when each unique image URL is loaded by a mail client. As you've noted, print operations can be logged by a tracking image in the @media print CSS directive. ...


22

I'm not an expert in the matter, but if you have a legitimate copy of the software in question and not a "cracked" copy then the main concern for you would be that the company that created the software would know that the key you used is not yours (you're the 300th person to use it). From there they could either prevent the software from working or attempt ...


20

In short: yes. Any software can harm you. Legally: If the authors of the software find you are using illicit copies of their software, they are at liberty to file a civil copyright infringement claim against you. Software commonly "phones home", even in the form of checking for new updates. They may not go after you if you're a poor individual, but they ...


14

One thing that has not been mentioned in the other answers: although using an illicit key might or might not be harmless, it usually correlates with malware infections - the key-generator, the key distribution website etc. are likely to contain trojans or other malware targetted at the less-savvy users.


13

Exposure of ciphertext does not inherently decrease is security of the algorithm. However, if the ciphertext is more easily accessible it is more likely to be found by an adversary. If your adversary has means to steal your private/shared keys, rubber hose you, etc its more risky to increase exposure. You may always want to consider that in the future a ...


11

No. Only the manufacturer of the software can know what key you have used and only if the software "calls home" for (re-)activation. Using a non-original key (for example, one provided by a key generator) will not give anyone back-door access to your computer/program.


6

I wouldn't be concerned. Your Internet client information (browser, Flash, JavaScript, Java, WebKit, and OS) and IP address are all things that can be easily obtained by any website you visit. With most web based programming languages, a single command is all it takes to pull this information from a visitor. It does not indicate a high level of information ...


4

What you describe here is called a known-plaintext attack. The attacker has at least part of the plaintext, and tries to use it to figure out the key. AES and all other modern encryption algorithms must be able to withstand this type of attack. So the answer is no.


4

There's no way to be 100% certain, but bear in mind that it's entirely possible for your VPN provider to see ALL of your traffic. Personally I do not sign into any personal account when using a VPN, particularly a free one. I'm guessing that you want something to bypass country specific law? The safest way is to purchase your own VPS (which you can find for ...


4

Read Google Chrome's privacy policy here Navigational errors caused are resolved automatically through Google servers. You can disable them in the Settings > Advanced Settings > Privacy. In fact, you may disable all checkboxes in Privacy section in order to not allow contacting Google every time you search something. You can also block cookies from Google ...


4

A lot of software "calls home" nowadays. So using a cracked key, you may be broadcasting to the software editor that you pirated the product. Whether they sue you or not is their prerogative, but that sure looks like harmful to me.


3

The risk/issue is exactly the same and the mitigation as well. Regardless if it loads the database partially or completely into memory. There will be no way for you to tell which keys have been compromised and which haven't. So the only option would be to revoke them all, regardless if it's a Redis or SQL database. Most of the time the reason why people are ...


3

Yes, that, and a lot more if you use their mobile app. Also, they are not alone on harvesting everything; always read the app permissions list before installing an app, and consider whether you are willing to share your data with the app maker...


3

I would like to disagree with the idea that email could be safe enough for confidential information exchange of any kind particularly between a psychologist and her patients. An often quoted rule is that you should always treat any unencrypted e-mailed communication to be about as confidential as if you wrote it on the back of a postcard. In reality it's a ...


3

Yes, most commercial RSS feeds do place beacons in RSS articles. They track your IP, and transfer it to their analytics service providers. You can test for yourself, by going to a feed by Feedburner, and examining all the tiny images that are loaded. You can also read the source code of the RSS feed to see for yourself that the link to "Full article" often ...


3

I get these questions from clients on a regular basis. The fundamental problem is that any email tracking technology requires cooperation from the client. The other answer dissected the image tracking so I won't repeat it here, other than to point out that the client must load the image from their server (said server is now on my block list). Web-based ...


3

1: The advantage of S/MIME over PGP is that you sign/encrypt a complete mime entity, not a text. This makes it possible to sign/encrypt a entire message/rfc822. Yes, headers must be visible and changeable to the MTA, but that can be accomplished by taking the WHOLE mail, S/MIME sign or encrypt it, and then package the signed/encrypted S/MIME entity it in a ...


2

Every time you browse GMail or your bank's website using HTTPS from your laptop in a coffee shop or airport, your are broadcasting all sorts of ciphertexts to everyone who cares to listen in. It had better be safe publicly to share ciphertexts. Assuming a great many things about the strengths of the chosen ciphersuite, crypto implementations, and ...


2

For IPv4, there isn't a good option. The address space is effectively entirely in use, so any partial storage means that one person voting can potentially block others from voting. The numbers towards the left generally represent ISP, geographic area, etc. -- things that an attacker might be able to figure by other means. The numbers towards the right ...


2

Protecting the root account makes cleanup much easier: if an attacker can't tamper with the kernel or most of the programs, it's much harder to hide malicious code. It also means they can't tamper with the antivirus and other protection systems.


2

In basic language we can say VPN provides access to private network (corporate / office ) from outside, using secure network connection over the public network (Internet/ISP). Types of VPN: Site-to-site VPNs connect entire networks to each other -- for example, connecting a branch office network to a company headquarters network. In a site-to-site VPN, ...


2

What should you do now to save yourself? In addition to all previously correct answers ensuring that there is no secret at all, I just would like to insist: Keep your system up to date!!! This is the first real protection against specific attack to specific version of your system, browser and tools like players. For vulnerable OS, keep your ...


2

Yes, it is sending the information to Google but It uses your computer's dns server. In Google you even have an ad ID correlated with you. This way they get to know your interests and give you according advertisements. However, I think that with incognito mode it doesn't send anything, because that's the point of it. EDIT: [This part is about incognito] ...


2

The statement is not untrue but IS possibly misleading. Certainly files are in fact cached while the in-private session is active, they are then cleared at the end. Of course, we all know this could leave a footprint. In-private sessions are not really meant to prevent someone from discovering a footprint but more to prevent inadvertent "bleed" between ...


1

Apologize to the other user; explain that you wrote a few words by mistake. (If he/she refuses to communicate with you, perhaps an moderator/admin will relay your excuse to him/her.) Reconcile your differences or agree to disagree. Having enemies for something as trivial as "a few words by mistake" is not necessary; save conflict and making enemies for the ...


1

In the old days, if you were a big company with multiple private local networks in multiple locations, you connected them together by installing private data lines between the various locations to make a Wide-Area Network. Then the Internet came along, and you also had to connect each site to the Internet. It turns out that Internet feeds are much, much ...


1

Yes, partially. In fact, that is (probably) why Google offers DNS servers for public use. Such a DNS server would not know all the information about you, though. It knows: The immediate upstream server that the request came from The FQDN of the server that you are trying to visit (e.g., security.stackexchange.com) Sometimes, the source of any embedded ...



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