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9

Connecting to VPN and using the Internet in the scenario you described is actually very secure. In the case you're talking about (mutual authentication), it is safe to say that ISPs aren't able to intercept and eavesdrop on the connection to know what the user is doing. However, in the example you made about war situations, government agencies don't just ...


4

If you are on unsecured WiFi, all of your internet traffic is broadcasted for everybody nearby to see. This means that any traffic to/from your computer that is not encrypted at another layer (such as SSL/TLS or SSH) will be visible, which can expose sensitive data, such as usernames and passwords, or authentication cookies. In addition to passive ...


4

It's very hard, but you can identify some sources. You can scan for the common types (GSM, Wifi, etc), but there's no way to tell a encrypted low-bandwidth signal from noise. Even if you get a very wide band scanner (from kHz to GHz), it's almost impossible to identify every channel entering a building. Signals exiting a building can be easier. You will ...


3

You are correct that brute force attacks are feasible, especially if the data being hashed comes from a relatively small search space. Here is a recent example where New York cab details were inadequately disguised using a hash. From the article: It turns out there's a significant flaw in the approach. Because both the medallion and hack numbers are ...


3

It mostly depends on the type of VPN you use, how it is setup and how you use it. Generally speaking, if your VPN is setup to process all your connections then the attacker will see the initial handshake and then only encrypted data (and some management traffic, from time to time). So, someone sniffing the network between you and the VPN host will not be ...


2

Not if you are still using your ISP DNS Below is very good answer that explains how to force all the traffic to leave your PC to the VPN http://security.stackexchange.com/a/13907/31356 If you configured the above correctly no one will be able to find out which sites you visit even if they were listening to your traffic unless your PC itself is bugged


2

No, it's not possible. If you've only used the groupon@****.net email address on the Groupon website then any cookie it might be in is only readable by Groupon themselves, or by a third-party whose content Groupon have permitted to appear on their website (unless the security of your own computer has been compromised).


2

There's an option "Who should see this?". As far as I know, changing that to custom and including someone, as you've mentioned here, your mom into "Don't share this", you can avoid getting monitored. For that commenting thing, you can choose to share only close friends, or like above, choose custom list. I guess, that's the only way


1

This is almost certainly a hardware fault in the video card; it's possible (but unlikely) that it's a bug in the video driver instead. The scrambled image you're seeing is leftover data from the game, stored in the video card's memory. Since you rebooted rather than doing a cold shutdown, the data wasn't lost due to lack of power. On starting up, Linux ...


1

It depends on who "they" are. If you're torrenting, the university can use commercial traffic inspection tools to identify p2p protocols. The tools are signature based, and the signatures are proprietary, so the exact methods used and methods to circumvent them vary. If you're torrenting illegally distributed copyrighted content, then the rights holders ...


1

First of all, a JAR file is a Java Runtime file, it runs a java-based program. What is commmon with OSX is that it checks the author fingerprint, and would give warnings if the Application or file isnt "trusted", which can mean its not gained through the Appstore, or is not signed (applications can be signed by an author). JAR Files if im right, cannot be ...


1

If you use http to access stackexchange, the university can access which account you are logged in with, as there is a link to your own account in the top bar. Note that it is a theoretical "can". If you use https and there is no university certificate or compromising software on the device you use, the university can't know that without using some very ...


1

Here is an article from Scientific American at the end of 2012 mentioning one real-world example-- 'OnTheMap' and references research into others: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/privacy-by-the-numbers-a-new-approach-to-safeguarding-data/ "One real-world application already uses differential privacy: a Census Bureau project called OnTheMap, which ...


1

The short answer is yes, technically speaking. They will have another admin account on the computer that they can access. By policy, though, access to this account is (hopefully) tightly controlled and will only be accessed if necessary. Also, there is no such thing as your computer legally speaking if it is a work issued asset. They can look at anything at ...


1

The main risk of using a proxy solution such as Browsec or any of the TOR clients is that they push your trust from your local network neighborhood (your employer, your ISP, your government) to an unknown remote network neighborhood (Russia? Finland? Black hats? GCHQ?). The exit node effectively controls how your browser (or other client) sees the network, ...


1

The short answer is yes, there are a variety of ways to achieve this, if I'm understanding your question correctly. A basic example would be that a user could set-up Team viewer on their home PC, then connect to it from anywhere in the world. they could then use VNC into the office over the Team Viewer connection and appear (from an IP address perspective) ...


1

This organisation should have a specific landing point for customers to receive/verify/modify their PIN code, which does not depend on departments, and department staff should be trained to not give this information just as they would not give other sensitive personal information. The reason is you can't ask departments to reason about the sensitivity of ...



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