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6

I'm afraid not. You might be able to solve your problem with something called "two factor authentication" though. This is an option you can enable in Gmail where you will need to have your mobile phone with you whenever you log onto your mail. It is very easy to set up and highly recommended. If this won't fix your issue, edit your question to add some ...


4

You're confusing two different companies and products: WhisperText LLC which develops the Whisper App They're the geolocating datasharing company that drew the criticism you linked. Open Whisper Systems which develops TextSecure, RedPhone, Signal These are various end to end encrypted products. I have seen no reason to distrust them. But obviously even ...


2

Your college would be able to know that you used Tor and can fairly easily block Tor if they wanted to. But what data goes through the Tor network is most likely out of bound for them. If your college runs a Tor exit node, and by chance Tor happen to pick the college's exit node, it is possible that they could do some sort of timing attack. But mounting ...


2

This really depends on the sites you're logged in to and how alert you are as a person. I can imagine the following scenarios (not specific to any of the sites you mentioned, but just general scenarios): Sensitive information is transmitted in the URL: For each request, a session ID is transmitted in the URL. In this case proxy servers will log the ...


1

Most microphones are visible as a small hole in the computer case. You can drive (slowly) a strong pin through it until it ceases to function (if the microphone is soldered directly to the motherboard, then there is some risk of damaging other components; this is safer if the microphone is, like mine, located over the screen, just beside the webcam). ...


1

The short answer is that any internet connection you access that is also tied to you personally (e.g. the login credentials on a college network) can be traced back to you. Therefore it is not suitable for full anonymity online. You enter your login credentials to access the network, the network admins can trace your connections through their network to a ...


1

While there doesn't appear to be any existing privacy-friendly CAs at this moment, all evidence suggests that the recently-announced Let's Encrypt CA (launching summer 2015) will not require users to provide personal information. This could change, but I doubt it will given EFF's involvement. If Let's Encrypt will not collect any personal information when ...


1

If you want to store data in a way that the person holding the data cannot read it, then You need to encrypt the data client-side. Encrypting server-side opens the possibility that someone (say, the operator of the service) can record the data while it's in transit. The encryption needs to be done using client-selected keys. If anyone else provides the ...



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