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What protects financial (or other sensitive transactions) that you make on the web is not a VPN or proxy, but HTTPS and TLS. These, used properly, secure the transmission of the data down the channel all the way from your web browser to the web server and back. Nobody in between, including your VPN provider should be able to access or modify this traffic. ...


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You are absolutely correct there is no real way to know with certainty that the provider is not monitoring you. This could either be purposefully or due to an unnoticed compromise. A VPN service logging your traffic would not be able to necessarily break the encryption used for a web page. They can man in the middle your traffic, but unless they can exploit ...


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Avoiding the tracking codes is most important for sites to which you don't identify yourself / your device anyway, i.e., anonymous surfing. Using Tor is the best option since you don't have to trust any VPN provider. VPN is the second best, and you can probably find a VPN provider that you trust as at least somewhat more than your mobile carrier. Third best ...


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The easiest way to avoid interception/modification of your web traffic is one that you mention in the question which is to use a VPN. This will encrypt traffic between your device and the VPN endpoint and should prevent your ISP from being able to modify web headers or other aspects of your use. There are VPN clients for most modern mobile operating ...


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For many Linux browsers (I've tested Opera, Firefox, and Konqueror), this is normal: a bare / is an invalid URL (there's no protocol), and it gets interpreted as file:///: "display a directory listing of the root directory". There's no security risk here: only you can display the contents of your computer's root directory using a file: URL, you cannot ...


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Elder relatives are very susceptible to this kind of fraud: A person digs through paper in a dumpster. They find out papers which hold personal information. Even a little bit sometimes is enough, e. g. name of employer, bank, school etc. When they have enough, they identify means of contacting relatives of the person whose information they have just ...


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The method I use is that I don't think about it too much. If a piece of mail may have something sensitive, it goes through the shredder. I don't want to spend all my time reading the mail, carefully looking for remnants of an account number, trying to make the decision of "shred or not?" The bigger question is: are you effectively reducing any risk? Are ...


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When I first read your post, I thought you were asking about Shredding files Digitally. Like: AVG Shred Utility However, in your case, you should understand that Identity Theft, cracking, etc, all requires a risk/reward assessment: Would someone "profit" by stealing your identity, addresses, etc, and is the value gained worth the risk to them? For most ...


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Shredding this information should provide some minimal protection against identity theft, and would be a good idea. However, people can still usually find this information (e.g. online, or in a phone book), so the protection gained from shredding this information is limited. However, there is usually other information attached to the document which could ...


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You asked: Will shredding documents that only have my name and address details on them protect me against identity theft, or offer any other information security benefit? The bigger question which cannot be truly answered is: "If in the event of identity theft, was it due to you not shredding documents?" Most of the times when it's time for me to dispose of ...


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When a company uses a proxy to inspect employees' ssl communication, they forge the target (e.g. your bank) certificate so that the employee thinks that he/she communicate with the bank but in actuality he/she communicates with the proxy and the proxy in turn comminicates with the bank. The proxy uses it own root certificate for the employee-proxy route. ...


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The common nomenclature for "typing patterns" is called a fist. Many decades ago when morse code and telegraphy were common for long-distance communication, telegraph operators could identify other telegraph operators by the habitual quirks in each-other's style of tapping the key. This soon became called a "fist" and it exists even today. Our typing ...


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Although I cannot say for sure what Google does or does not, it is unlikely that it records your "typing pattern". You can see the reason why thanks to Fabian Monrose's paper. Since you are not likely to type long texts in the search bar the keystroke dynamic is not accurate enough to identify you perfectly, let alone out of millions of users. Moreover, you ...


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Wikipedia is awesome: it contains a lot of useful information. In this case, the following schema: So there are basically 46 bits for global unicast MAC addresses, for 246 possible addresses. MAC addresses do not leak beyond your local link (machines on the same LAN as you see your MAC address, other people do not). IP addresses are used for global ...


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So there is nothing you can do about his activity, except to ignore it as the comments suggest. What you can do, is to re-evaluate your security practices, and make sure your house is in order in case he decides he wants to try to do some digital damage, to ensure you're as well protected as can be. This means: Choose strong passwords. Don't reuse ...


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How it works: Picture a pipe. The pipe has a huge variety of valves and possible turns (blocked off by more valves), and information flows to and from a variety of points. The pipe is the internet, and, in some cases, your e-mail providers. Your spy is trying to get you to open a valve to a point HE controls so he can tell when you read his e-mail, so he ...


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You can't necessarily know if an email you receive is designed to be tracked but as tracking is limited to certain techniques, you can infer a higher probability of this behaviour if the email seems tailored towards such an end: Email includes images that need to be downloaded remotely Typically an email can have all images and formatting stored internally ...


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If their encryption is indeed secure, it would ensure that anyone who can eavesdrop on your connection between you and their server will not be able to find out what you are doing. This is a very big if because they don't provide any details on their FAQ about what algorithms they are using and how they use them. Their FAQ only mentions "our proprietary ...


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An alternate approach and a legitimate one is to simply use a random Class 4 UUID1. This way you detach your keys from any changes in material circumstances and any shifts in your privacy attitude in your personal or professional life. If you intend to use key servers so that people may contact you securely from the onset (instead of sending a signed ...


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Keep in mind that the HTTPS connection only works between you and Google - the website that actually hosts the picture might not support HTTPS. If you never click the "visit page" or "view image" buttons, you are probably safe since you are viewing Google's copy of the image. However, if you click one of those buttons, you will download the image from ...


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For all practical purposes, if you are accessing the internet from your own personal computer, then using SSL alone will prevent your network administrator from knowing the exact URL (initial DNS connection will only reveal hostname) of the images you download from https://images.google.com/. However, if you are using your employer's computer, where the OS ...


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The short answer is no, the Evidence of Identity (EOI) isn't mandatory, or forced upon them by governments (as least as far as I know) or Internet standards. However consider that the CAs product is trust. People trust a CA to only issue certificates to the legal owners of trusted sites. EOI forms part of the chain of trust. A CA may be able to redesign ...


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If you haven't disabled search history, they'd be able to look at your searches if they go to the search history record for your account. You can check your own Google search history by logging in here. They may also be able to track activity on other Google services, like Youtube, Maps, News, etc since they've implemented Single Sign-On which logs you ...


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There are a number of providers available for this. You want to make sure that the provider you select has built in encryption options for which you can maintain the key. The below providers all support this. Crashplan BackBlaze Remember that you need configure the software to use an encryption key you have generated yourself and keep this secure and ...


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There is no way to be sure that the resipient won't retransmit your documents unsecured to others. You could use password secured PDF files, theoretically they sould be safe if you forbit to print and edit them. But even in this case, one could easily take a screenshot and get the crititcal Information out of the PDF. Or someone resends your files in the ...



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