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According to "Security Analysis of Android Factory Resets" "We recovered Google tokens in all devices with flawed Factory Reset, and the master token 80% of the time. Tokens for other apps such as Facebook can be recovered similarly. These two alternative partial solutions from Hacker News (can't find original source) Remotely wiping the smartphone ...


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PPTP is not secure How can I tell if a PPTP tunnel is secure? If you want to browse the Internet without being monitored then use a program like OpenVPN. Please see the comment below your question as it is important.


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The panopticlick site has "self defense" recommendations to avoid tracking. One of the recommendations is to use the torbutton. The torbrowser design docs have a good description of how they try to avoid browser fingerprinting and tracking. All of these approaches are trying to normalize your profile to look like as many other people as possible.


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Pros - Easy to implement network wide (DHCP server and a local DNS server are enough) - Easy to block (just add it to a list in the DNS server and route it to a bogus address or local address) - Easy to Bypass (if needed its easy to bypass) Cons - Easy to bypass, just use a different DNS or add an entry to the hosts file is enough. - Is considered "Bad ...


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The advantage is that it is simple and reasonably effective against casual issues. The disadvantage is that it is easily bypassed. Check out OpenDNS as they offer this kind of service & I use this on the home network to help protect things.


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Tor provides you anonymity, but it will not protect you at all from malwares or any other security threats. All recommendation regarding network security must therefore be scrupulously respected in order to ensure your network safety. You do not mention it in your description, but be aware that your setup matches Whonix project, so if you do not want to ...


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I'm setting up a physically isolated Tor system (with one computer serving as the workstation and another as a Tor gateway), ... I don't know what your "physically isolated" refers to, but since you have a work station connected to a Tor gateway I would assume that you plan to use the workstation to access the internet through the Tor gateway. In this ...


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Todays used fingerprints mostly rely on generating as much entropy as possible by exploiting as much details of the browser as they can. Even subtle, but short term stable details, like the exact (hardware and driver version dependent) rendering on a canvas is exploited. The information gathered is most likely compressed by generating a long enough hash ...


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TOR -> startpage search -> view by Ixquick Proxy. This always worked for me the few times I've needed it. or just use https://ixquick.com search engine instead of startpage. As for setting TOR up to do this automatically without the hassle, I don't know.


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Finally busting the NoScript Scam. Or as it were. It's long been time your question was raised on the 'net. To start off getting into answers, let's just take one of these surrogates allegedly meant to keep sites working the way "you" want and see what it does. I'm picking one at random - "noscript.surrogate.adriver.sources" (of course, that's "Ad River", ...


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Am I just running around and is there a better way to do this or is this not going to accomplish a private email account anyway? It's not going to accomplish privacy from the prying eyes of major governments for a very simple reason: the e-mails sent to your company can be read from the sender's outbox (perhaps even while they are being composed!). ...


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Several proxies add extra headers to a session which leaks info such as the X-Forwarded-For header which includes the origin IP address. Since OP question states there is no GPS/GSM network involved, then one can assume this is running on a desktop, laptop, or WiFi tablet, therefore the location data is likely being acquired by geoip data related to the IP ...


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This answer and this other answer might be relevant for you. In particular, quoting from this wikipedia page The most common sources of location information are IP address, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth MAC address, radio-frequency identification (RFID), Wi-Fi connection location, or device Global Positioning System (GPS) and GSM/CDMA cell IDs. The location ...


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This by no means is a solid answer (I'd rather leave this as a comment than an answer, but I do not have the proper reputation). Depending on the network settings of your VirtualBox, if someone somehow got control of your VirtualBox, they could possibly get into your router or other devices on your network depending on settings and situation. Not to ...


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If you can not trust your virtualisation software, you're in deep trouble. The virtualisation software can do *anything it wants) to the virtualised code (due to direct memory manipulation) but this is at the level of "Hey, can someone steal my creditcard data even if I encrypted it from memory when the memory is full of measurement probes?" (a.k.a. you ...


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I just put some opinions from this link: If they wanted to include backdoors in VirtualBox, they would've closed the source a long time ago. Why would they spend time implementing a backdoor in open-source software that, if ever detected, would pretty much lead to everyone abandoning the software en masse? Leaving it open allows potentially thousands of ...


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Use the company phone for business and keep things separate. Only an optimistic and idealistic person would hope or expect that you will not encounter any issues going forwards. Sometimes you need to keep things separate, this is one of those times, who knows what the future will hold and what kind of situation you might find yourself in where data on one ...


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Your employer will "supervise" the device by connecting it to a computer running Apple Configurator which will restore it and apply a configuration profile with a certificate in it. That will allow them to push more profiles to your device remotely, and these profiles may include other certificates that can be used to intercept secure connections from your ...


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From a security stand point, you will generally prefer to have your own device. This just keeps everything separate. Even if you backup your phone and all your data, it is probably better to keep it separate. This also assume that the company permits by policy and by technical controls the ability for you to independently backup your device. You also run the ...


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Just wanted to chime in and say that the list you have there isn't entirely 100% accurate, but it is close. Keep in mind that this will vary per MDM vendor and mobile OS, but MobileIron can see your location if your employer enables the functionality and you choose to accept sharing your location data. How exactly is this done? They just configure ...


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My company is currently going through the process of implementing an MDM for all work phones... So perhaps something that I can help with. The company will install profiles and policies onto the mobile device which (On top of what you have outlined above in image) can enforce the following: Constant VPN connection (Ability to intercept network traffic to ...


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For USB, SDcard, and other one-off external filesystems, I typically prefer using GPG in symmetric (-c ) mode. The GnuPG code is well designed for this purpose. For Operating systems, in particular Windows, Linux/BSD, and OS X -- I am very careful to use a SED instead of (or in addition to) software-based filesystems and secure-boot protections. Mobile ...


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There's plenty of apps out there to [...] figure out the password. Well, yeah, those are dictionary attacks. It doesn't matter if you're using AES-256 or FOOBAR-1024, if you choose a weak password it can be broken easily. The only thing that helps slightly against dictionary attacks is using an expensive key derivation function. From a comment on the ...


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Before searching via Internet, I was thinking about it; what about creating virtual machine inside a virtual machine (nested vms) and use different VPN for each of them. At the end, Is it more secure or just making 'tortoise' Internet speed? After searching, I found a guy who claims that using nested VMs with VPN chain is a complete solution for ...


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It will be secure in that other people would not be able to access it. However, if they do then you should not run this locally as your own machine could be compromised by a malicious user. However, be aware that the following could still be possible, depending on the CMS: There could be an XSS flaw. If the CMS is displayiing content from your online ...


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People have hinted around the possibilities of what a known MAC hardware address can deprive a device of. Two very real uses that I have researched and written programs to do: one, if your address is spoofed on another computer packet sniffing becomes very easy (obtaining usernames, passwords... just about every keystroke); two, you could plant packets or ...


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Assuming you're running a server locally and putting a local Drupal/WordPress etc. CMS on that local server than sure, you could configure it not to be accessible to the outside world. But, seeing as it sounds like you want to actually have an 'online' website that won't really work. If you want to securely work with a CMS gowenfawr is right just lookup ...


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If your CMS is listening to 127.0.0.1 ("localhost") and not to any other IP addresses on your system, then yes, no one online will be able to access it. You will be the only one able to access it, while logged into the computer it's running on. It is unusual that this would be what you want, but hey, maybe you just want to use your CMS as a personal ...


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TL;DR, you can't. The protocol behind email is quite primitive, and in many ways very closely mimics the meatspace postal system. Nothing stops me from dropping a letter in the mailbox pretending to be from someone else (although the postmark might indicate that the letter wasn't actually picked up from where the return address specifies). That said, the ...


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Bear in mind that if you and your friends all have each other as contacts the email could have been sent from one of their systems and simply masqueraded as you. The from address in an email is very easy to spoof, so just because it says it is from you (or a made up address that has your name so that it looks like you) it does not necessarily mean it was ...


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There is a magazine about that type of security(especially against NSA and others). The Tech Active Series - The Hacker's Manual 2015. In the first chapter, it talks about Privacy; how to protect your privacy, how prevent agencies or black hats to track your data, open source alternatives for daily-use services, how to secure you smart-phone and encrypting ...



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