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1

The common nomenclature for "typing patterns" is called a fist. Many decades ago when morse code and telegraphy were common for long-distance communication, telegraph operators could identify other telegraph operators by the habitual quirks in each-other's style of tapping the key. This soon became called a "fist" and it exists even today. Our typing ...


1

Although I cannot say for sure what Google does or does not, it is unlikely that it records your "typing pattern". You can see the reason why thanks to Fabian Monrose's paper. Since you are not likely to type long texts in the search bar the keystroke dynamic is not accurate enough to identify you perfectly, let alone out of millions of users. Moreover, you ...


3

Wikipedia is awesome: it contains a lot of useful information. In this case, the following schema: So there are basically 46 bits for global unicast MAC addresses, for 246 possible addresses. MAC addresses do not leak beyond your local link (machines on the same LAN as you see your MAC address, other people do not). IP addresses are used for global ...


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So there is nothing you can do about his activity, except to ignore it as the comments suggest. What you can do, is to re-evaluate your security practices, and make sure your house is in order in case he decides he wants to try to do some digital damage, to ensure you're as well protected as can be. This means: Choose strong passwords. Don't reuse ...


1

How it works: Picture a pipe. The pipe has a huge variety of valves and possible turns (blocked off by more valves), and information flows to and from a variety of points. The pipe is the internet, and, in some cases, your e-mail providers. Your spy is trying to get you to open a valve to a point HE controls so he can tell when you read his e-mail, so he ...


3

You can't necessarily know if an email you receive is designed to be tracked but as tracking is limited to certain techniques, you can infer a higher probability of this behaviour if the email seems tailored towards such an end: Email includes images that need to be downloaded remotely Typically an email can have all images and formatting stored internally ...


1

If their encryption is indeed secure, it would ensure that anyone who can eavesdrop on your connection between you and their server will not be able to find out what you are doing. This is a very big if because they don't provide any details on their FAQ about what algorithms they are using and how they use them. Their FAQ only mentions "our proprietary ...


0

An alternate approach and a legitimate one is to simply use a random Class 4 UUID1. This way you detach your keys from any changes in material circumstances and any shifts in your privacy attitude in your personal or professional life. If you intend to use key servers so that people may contact you securely from the onset (instead of sending a signed ...


3

Keep in mind that the HTTPS connection only works between you and Google - the website that actually hosts the picture might not support HTTPS. If you never click the "visit page" or "view image" buttons, you are probably safe since you are viewing Google's copy of the image. However, if you click one of those buttons, you will download the image from ...


8

For all practical purposes, if you are accessing the internet from your own personal computer, then using SSL alone will prevent your network administrator from knowing the exact URL (initial DNS connection will only reveal hostname) of the images you download from https://images.google.com/. However, if you are using your employer's computer, where the OS ...


0

The short answer is no, the Evidence of Identity (EOI) isn't mandatory, or forced upon them by governments (as least as far as I know) or Internet standards. However consider that the CAs product is trust. People trust a CA to only issue certificates to the legal owners of trusted sites. EOI forms part of the chain of trust. A CA may be able to redesign ...


1

If you haven't disabled search history, they'd be able to look at your searches if they go to the search history record for your account. You can check your own Google search history by logging in here. They may also be able to track activity on other Google services, like Youtube, Maps, News, etc since they've implemented Single Sign-On which logs you ...


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There are a number of providers available for this. You want to make sure that the provider you select has built in encryption options for which you can maintain the key. The below providers all support this. Crashplan BackBlaze Remember that you need configure the software to use an encryption key you have generated yourself and keep this secure and ...


2

There is no way to be sure that the resipient won't retransmit your documents unsecured to others. You could use password secured PDF files, theoretically they sould be safe if you forbit to print and edit them. But even in this case, one could easily take a screenshot and get the crititcal Information out of the PDF. Or someone resends your files in the ...


2

That's a bit unfortunate. So long as your code and testing framework are both public, there's nothing that you can do that your unauthorized users can't. You need to lock something down. The best this I can think of is to put the data on the server running your tests. Limit access to the server to only authorized individuals. That way even if people find ...


0

Actually, Google uses various cues to decide what to display, including your IP, HTTP headers, the domain name you typed and your Google account's preferences. I was too lazy to track what it does but I noticed this has changed over the years. I know this because I do not often use the main language of my place of residence, I travel often, and my browsers ...


5

In my hands, both Chrome's incognito and Firefox's private browsing still send the HTTP header line HTTP_ACCEPT_LANGUAGE => 'en-US,en;q=0.5' headers, telling all and sundry that I want American English. I haven't tried all the various plugins you mention, but I would be surprised if any of them block this header. If you run your own web server, you can ...


1

They're probably setting the language based on your system and browser's language setting, not based on your location.


1

Pretty much all mail systems have a limit on email size. You can howevr overcome it by splitting your big file in several mails. As for policy, you should read the terms of use of each provider to figure out. For instance GMail restricts (restricted?) usage of third-party applications to avoid that you use GMail as a virtual drive (there were several ...


0

It's conceivable, but it's more likely the malware will take steps to deactivate or otherwise sabotage the AV. Or, more typically, that the AV won't know how to completely remove one or more parts of the installed malware, leaving stealthy backdoors behind that will reinstall/update the software and/or install other malware. You can't really be confident ...


1

Yes, malware/spyware can indeed detect antivirus software and perform defensive mechanisms. This is a never-ending ‘arms race’ on how and where they hide code. Fortunately, once a system is compromised there is no 100% accuracy on getting back to a clean slate without wiping the system back to a known good state. In my enterprise environment, once we ...


0

Locking someone out after wrongfully entering their info for x amount of times for x hours/days is a good idea, but annoying to users, this helps preventing Bruteforcing. What could be an alternative, is that instead of getting a list when you enter a SSN number, that you have to manually enter the address yourself, and a script checking if that address is ...


2

There was real case when guy discovered that some website used MySQL's UUID value somewhere in URL. Also he learned that output of function contains MAC address. Guy looked up and found that MAC belongs to Dell. So, server is probably Dell make. After making this discovery about 2am he went to sleep and in some reason looked on this site again on morning. ...


1

Differentially private mechanisms have been implemented in prototypes. These prototypes will usually take a set of records (eg. a database table) and a query, and then return the result of the query on the table with a small amount of added noise to guarantee differential privacy. While proving that a mechanism is differentially private is mathematically ...


0

The other questions are excellent, but something else that wasn't mentioned is in regards to identifying whether a particular device is yours, by a government or organization. For example, say you are Edward Snowden and you had once posted your Mac address on a public forum where it's clear you are the one who posted it. Now, say that a government raided ...


2

Mostly, no. If knew your MAC, I could disguise my network card as yours when dealing with a gateway (e.g. a Wi-Fi router); that's pretty much all of it. It's extremely unlikely that this could cause any annoyance to you, let alone pose a security risk. The only situation I can think of is something on the lines of We're staying at the same hotel. The ...



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