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1

To get randomness, you must obtain sufficient initial entropy from some "really random" events, that come from physical systems. Once you have sufficient initial entropy, you can extend it indefinitely with a cryptographically secure PRNG. The PRNG being a deterministic process, its output is not impacted by whatever other process may run at the same time on ...


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Cryptographically secure random number generators are deterministic mathematical processes for given arguments, and do not care about the factors that having running programs affects - i.e. the kernel state and the data stored in RAM. There is no reason that other programs would affect the operation of these generators.


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There is the hardware based RDRAND instruction on IvyBridge Intel processors. If that is availabe (ie chip has instuction and does not have the RDRAND hardware bug cover-up) then I think Linux does automatically use it. Meaning you should get very large amounts of true random numbers very fast.


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Entropy is required in the following sense: if a PRNG has only n bits of entropy, then this means that it has (conceptually) only 2n possible internal states, and thus could be broken through brutal enumeration of these 2n states, provided that n is low enough for such a brute force attack to be feasible. Then things become complex, because the "entropy ...


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Come to think of it, you could implement an engine with a weak RNG and insert it into OpenSSL using: ENGINE_set_default(e, ENGINE_METHOD_RAND); That should make sure that the random number generator is used. Of course it may be a good idea to ignore any seed information given to the random RNG by the OpenSSL. This has the obvious disadvantage that it may ...


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dev/random is not even remotely the same as NIST SP 800-90A DRGB. If you want to claim compliance to NIST SP 800-90A DRGB then hire a test lab to test your DRBG and submit the results to NIST's Cryptographic Algorithm Validation Program (http://csrc.nist.gov/groups/STM/cavp/index.html) and then it will end up on this list: ...


3

If we take a look at the man page for random we get the following: The random number generator gathers environmental noise from device drivers and other sources into an entropy pool. The generator also keeps an estimate of the number of bits of noise in the entropy pool. From this entropy pool random numbers are created. At the bottom we see: ...


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Although there are no guarantees, there are mathematical safety-measures against poor keys due to inappropriate random number generators. You could for example try some nice software tools to test the statistical entropy that your generator puts out: Dieharder TestU01 These tools come with a large number of statistical tests, but as RFC 4086 states: ...



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