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You could run ent to see how much entropy a file has, a file with high entropy is likely either compressed or encrypted (or both). A problem is that JPEG, XLSX and ZIP are compressed, so actually compressed files are very common. If you suspect that X is an encrypted version of file Z then you could check if they have similar sizes, plus small delta for ...


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If you have a clean system, you can use PowerShell to generate hashes for the valid files (i.e., you may have valid encrypted, compressed, binary and regular files); and each sweep you generate new hashes and compare if any hash has changed. Based on type, etc you can determine if this is normal behavior. For instance, I look use PowerShell Get-Process in ...


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You can use the file command on Linux/Unix/BSD (pick your poison). For example: $ gpg --encrypt test-encrypted -r sample@sample.com Enter the user ID. End with an empty line: $ ls test-encrypted test-encrypted.gpg $ mv test-encrypted.gpg testfile.txt $ file testfile.txt testfile.txt: GPG encrypted data However, this only ...


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Short answer: Start learning the security aspects of the technologies you already know. Longer answer: the term "cyber security expert" is much broader than I think you realize. Like any technical field, there are lots of sub-areas, each requiring specialized knowledge. Even on this site you can see that no one person feels qualified to answer all types ...



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