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A DNS entry to 127.0.0.1 is only helpful if the computer is inside a corporate network. In a home environment or at a public wireless site you have to rely on the browsers "Automatically detect proxy settings." If the browser has been re-installed or a new one installed the settings Proxy settings may still be turned on. To protect the system, put an entry ...


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My question is has the malware installed proxy server on my pc? Based on your description this is very likely. How the malware has done this? Use of proxy is only a registry setting or similar (i.e. browser profile) setting and can be changed by a process (no manual interaction required). How to resolve this issue? Unless you have ...


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There is no way to do it with "external" tools. Because the information about the circuits is kept within Tor. However you can utilise Tor's control protocol. This means you can connect to your Tor client and extract information out of your client. So sending GETINFO circuit-status prints out information to your current circuit(s). Usually Tor opens several ...


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Google's new reCAPTCHA uses cookies: To put it simply: user’s past behavior and previous CAPTCHA solves are recorded in their cookies, which are then detected by future reCAPTCHA challenges. So seeing different behavior in different browsers isn't surprising. You may find that using an incognito/private browser window changes the behavior.


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This is something that you will commonly face through TOR too. Since a large number of people may be using the same server/exit-node as a proxy, Google receives a larger number of requests from a single machine. When it detects this, it asks you to solve a captcha to prove that you aren't a robot. It doesn't matter if your using safari. Use chrome, and ...


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you can always use the "youtube" excuse. To many users, to much content, impossible to manage, Heres our disclaimer of our lack of control of data, we exempt ourselves from resposibility, Then look official, with complaint departments etc. To better clarify though; 2 points are needed. 1. nature of crime. 2. Country of server Its all about perception, ...


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It depends a lot of the country where the server is and the jurisdiction there. But even in a country that would follow such cases it depends on the acual law itself. For example you mostly have to have a certain standard of security for you services. If you can prove that you have the usual security standard you won´t get punished (anonymous VPN does not ...


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Short answer: No, that would not be a valid defense. Let's say you penetrate a site. The site views your IP and reports you to the authorities. They then ask your ISP who had that IP at that time, and will be directed to you. That's a lot of evidence to suggest that someone from your home and/or network hacked the site. Saying it wasn't you because your ...


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To play MITM with HTTPS, your ISP would need to create fake server certificates on the fly for the domains you visit. Your browser would flag these certificates as security probems, since they would not be signed by any trusted CA. That is, unless you imported the CA certificate used by the ISP as a trusted CA. In that case your browser will think everything ...


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Effectively they can see everything you do that's not encrypted or sent through a tunnel and in many cases they can see what type of traffic that is too via DNS. I'll list a few examples: What sites you frequent. When you're active on-line. What operating systems you use and in many cases what software you use. How often you patch your computer. The ...


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The cellular issue when testing mobile apps does make them a little tricky to test. Some app's are aware of when they are communicating via the telecommunication provider directly and in some cases will behave differently when connected. some very old app's had a horrible pattern of sending data securely when sending data via 802.11 (using IPv4) but would ...


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Yes, it is generally still possible, but techniques like Certificate Pinning and others make it more and more difficult to do a Man-in-the-Middle Attack. I've also observed quite a lot of apps (on Android though) and found that especially messaging and communication apps (Facebook, Snapchat, ...) try to make sniffing network traffic as hard as possible. ...



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