New answers tagged

1

Agree with what Drewbenn commented. It appears that your account was opened in a significantly different geographical location. Netflix recently made changes to what type of traffic they will permit to stream. Without knowing more about where you opened your account and where you now reside it's difficult to pin that down as the problem. See below: ...


-4

How paranoid are you and how much money do you have to spend? If you have money to spend then I would go to a local big box store and buy a cheap laptop off the shelf. Take it to a local library, unbox it there, wipe it clean, download a decent Linux security distro livecd and install it on the laptop. SecurityOnion isn't bad. One thing to look for is ...


1

You should check whether your current IP is on a proxy list. Since your IP address is assigned dynamically, it could be that the former owner got himself onto a proxy list - these lists get generically blocked by many pages. It is, however, easier, just to get a new IP and try again.


0

Of sorts, you can always try to hide yourself. If I was to do something and didn't want to get caught, I would use TAILS OS. If my only choice was Windows, why not use a VPN that isn't based in the United States? Or use proxy-chain or TOR? All of those would HELP hide your identity. Theoretically, if you were to brute-force a website's Admin account, and ...


0

If you do not have specific permission testing the system in question the most secure way would be to not brute force at all. However if you do have permission you have to ask yourself: How hidden do you actually have to be? If you just need a proof of concept that you can show then using a simple proxy, would be sufficient. As well as keep cost and ...


0

1) How zscaler see the clients traffic from cloud and how it filters malicious traffic? Because it is configured as a proxy and thus the client sends its web traffic there. 2) How zscaler protects the web applications from external threats? zscaler is not a Web Application Firewall, i.e. it does not protect the web application but the client ...


0

Https or SSL proxies are not secure, Constantly they use alternative SSL certificates to show on user's browser, In other word you have not a real https connection with web server, and your login pages and private data open in proxy server. simply by cheching https://google.com certificate via a proxy and Direct mode you will find diffrent Verifies.


0

The primary benefits of a reverse proxy are better performance, capacity and traffic management. There is a small security benefit in that it provides some isolation for your application - only valid http will likely get as far as your webserver, and it should better handle sloloris type attacks. Most such proxies allow for applying some smarts to the ...


3

I'd like to first specifically comment on this statement - "There are so many unsecured sites using a reverse proxy and I feel like that doesn't protect them." Just because you see some site is using X or Y CDN/WAF, it doesn't mean they have some/any security. Some use free/cheap-tier plans that offer partial security, and others don't turn ON ...


0

Likely, more information is needed to properly answer. You could, however, add the site you are trying to access to the SSL Pass Through list in the Burp proxy options. This has the consequence of losing the ability to inspect request and response in Burp, but it will let you access the site while still using the burp proxy. You can read more about Burp's ...


0

Most of the time it is possible to intercept Application traffic even if you have implemented certificate pinning for Application but request should be encrypted when you have intercepted using Charles proxy. But it is possible to intercept traffic using SSLBypass, SSL Trust Killer, iOS SSL Kill Switch using proxy such as Burp.


3

According to several of these answers: http://serverfault.com/questions/381393/can-the-ip-address-for-an-http-request-be-spoofed It is really unlikely that you could indeed spoof the IP address and send a full HTTP request to a server. TCP requires a three-way handshake, which means sending one packet back to the sender and expecting a very specific answer ...



Top 50 recent answers are included