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8

Will all the key pairs that ssh-keygengenerates be unique (not taking collision into account at this point)? Yes, every key pair will be unique, with well above 99.99999% probability. This is largely due to the size of the key space and the quality of the CSPRNG that is used (see below). If yes, how does ssh-keygen assure that all key pairs that ...


4

You have got that wrong, at least the encryption. Asymmetric Encryption is done using public key of the receiver. Therefore it provides Secrecy (nobody without private key can not read the message). But it does not provide Integrity -- anyone can encrypt any message and send it to you with your public key. Wikipedia is a good friend: Digital signature ...


4

There is no security impact to either stop or continue the handshake -- the security relies in the tests performed by the client, not the server. This is why the extension is called an indication. What matters is that the client duly verifies that the apparent server public key is really owned by the intended server. The SNI is a way for the client to convey ...


3

The pathlen constraint is only valid in subordinate CA certificates. If you followed the first article you linked and generated a trust-anchor with a pathlen constraint then it is not checked. According to RFC5280 section 6.1.4 (k) basicConstraint is only checked in certificate i+1 (where the trust-anchor is the first (i=1) and subsequent certificates in ...


3

You can have multiple valid certificates with the same subject but different keys active at the same time. A possible use with SAN certificates would be to use certificates with the same subject but different key for the different hostnames contained in the certificate. You could even use it for the same hostname (i.e. same hostname on multiple IP addresses) ...


2

As explained over at explain xkcd, key signing parties are a way to meet a lot of people and check their IDs easily in order to sign their (GPG) public keys. Signing public keys is essentially vouching for the identity of the key holder, as not everyone can make sure it's actually the key of the real person they'd like to talk to. Thus, the so called "web ...


2

Short answer: If the public key has changed, so has their private key. Long explination: Modern cipher suites used by SSL/TLS servers have exactly one key pairing. So as long as one of the keys has changed, then the other key has changed as well. So if they have also disabled SSLv2 then you should be good to go. More information can easily be found on the ...


1

Fundamentally, to trust a computer, you need to verify that it knows something that only the computer you're expecting knows. This is how all certificates work: you assume that because they signed something with a key that only they could possibly know then it's actually the person you wanted to talk to. The same applies for computers: the computer has to ...


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Both the QR code and the 60 digit number need to be verified "out of band", for example: Saying the number out loud in a telephone call Meeting in person and scanning the QR code directly from the other device


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Once you have deployed a private key in a USB Dongle it is impossible to extract it. This is the main reason to use a USB Dongle, to ensure the key is always hardware protected. The only option is to generate a new private key and request a new certificate


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Theoretically, the DER-encoded public key may be changed without modifying the actual secret in the private key; there are (at least) two ways to do that: Change the DER encoding. While DER is supposedly deterministic, there is still an optional element in the AlgorithmIdentifier structure that identifies the key type. For a RSA public key, the OID in that ...



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