New answers tagged

1

There are subtleties about such comparisons. To crack symmetric encryption, like this password-based encryption of the private key, one needs to one either of the following: guess the password; guess the symmetric key derived from the password; leverage a structural weakness in the encryption algorithm or how it is used. In the page you link, the ...


0

Stunnel is SSL and, in SSL, private keys never need to travel. The "SSL ethos" is that X.509 certificates are used to authenticate peers without a pre-distributed shared secret. For example, when you connect your Web browser to https://example.com, the SSL layer recognizes the server certificate and can make sure that it talks to the real "example.com" ...


0

No. If you want to use client certificate authentication, then you need to copy the client's private key and certificate to the client from the certificate authority. If you want to allow clients to authenticate a server, then you need to copy the server's private key and certificate from the certificate authority to the server. Exactly how you want to ...


6

Checking the root certificates of my browser I see that almost all Root CAs are using SHA-1 or below. The signing algorithm used for the trusted root certificates is unimportant. Signatures are used to establish trust. By definition, a trusted root certificate is one which you implicitly trust based on provenance (e.g., where it came from and how it ...


0

To give an exact mathematical answer I'd need more details like which encryption cipher, which public key algorithm, etc. But generally speaking yes, it is at least as difficult. The public key part imported just fine - see below - so it is his key, he's not lying about that, but the private key appears to be encrypted with a password-based symmetric ...


1

The long and short is: it depends! A long, strong, random passphrase encrypted properly with lots of iterations is very safe unless there's a flaw in gpg somewhere (which is possible, of course), very safe. A weak passphrase is always unsafe. A small number of iterations on encryption makes the area of "weak passphrase" bigger, and the area of "strong ...


0

Just to be precise, an X.509 certificate has a non-optional end of validity date, so you cannot make a standard-compliant "permanent" certificate. However, that date can be encoded as a GeneralizedTime which can encode instants up to the end of year 9999, which is far enough in the future to be considered "forever". Note that there is a binary equivalent to ...


0

If you want to parse on Windows as well you should use keyStr.replaceAll("(-+BEGIN RSA PRIVATE KEY-+\\r?\\n|-+END RSA PRIVATE KEY-+\\r?\\n?)", ""); to substitute DER string.


3

If you use a public key that someone else is using, it means that you are also using the same private key. In other words, that person would be able to (a) decrypt any encrypted messages you receive and (b) impersonate your digital signature. Just like a pair of identical house keys are interchangeable, a pair of identical public-private key pairs are ...


0

The Boneh-Lynn-Shacham signature scheme works only in special elliptic curves that support efficient pairing computations. This is not something that you somehow add on top of an existing signature; it is a signature algorithm in its own right, that uses its own kind of public/private key pairs. If you want something that works with X.509, then you need a ...


-2

Consider some ssh key management software that can store and dynamically manage (change) ssh keys, this is directly analogous to a password management system. However these solutions come at a cost !


1

Sorry, per the sourcecode you can't prevent the writing of $outdir/$serial.pem and still get your (desired) -out. You could put $outdir someplace like /tmp that gets discarded frequently; or on an OS that allows you to add new filesystem types (Linux at least) you could create a filesystem type that implements a directory such that anything created in it is ...


0

As described on the manpage for openSSL: -out filename the output file to output certificates to. The default is standard output. The certificate details will also be printed out to this file in PEM format (except that -spkac outputs DER format). So it seems this will always write the certificate in a PEM format. You could choose to write these to ...


0

Q1 For public websites the most safe approach, or the only safe way is to use certificates from a trusted CA. However, in many scenarios we can use a self signed certificate to get "safe" connections with a web site. Browsers can't trust in SSC at all, but it launch a scary warning to prevent users about a posible untrusted and risky site. Q2 A server key ...


0

It is unclear to me exactly why you are implementing such a complex authentication mechanism. Homegrown authentication solutions are notoriously difficult to get correct. So my first thoughts are to try and steer you to more standard mechanisms. In summary, my recommendation is to use username/password for authentication. If you have a good reason not to ...


0

1) A self-signed certificate uses your key to sign itself; there is no CA involved, there is nothing to verify. The certificate will basically verify that it is matching the key but nothing more, so it serves no real verification purpose. Your browser will pop up a self-signed certificate warning, which means that the key is not certified by anyone. This ...


2

tl;dr: both dumps contain the same keys, but you get some additional certifications from the key server not included in the minimal export of the VeraCrypt website. OpenPGP Packets OpenPGP keys are composed by a set of OpenPGP packets, which can be listed by gpg --list-packets and pgpdump. For exported keys, there's one required packet, the public key ...


2

A PGP keyfile is not a single key string, but contains several entries (packets). Instead of trying to compare the ASCII representation of both files, you should use appropriate tools such as gpg(1) and compare the fingerprints. Is there some way to make this easy? Yes, like this: $ wget https://www.idrix.fr/VeraCrypt/VeraCrypt_PGP_public_key.asc $ ...


5

How can I use letsencrypt to get a signed public key for use with OpenPGP? This is not possible for several reasons. letsencrypt does not Verify Idenitity So I can prove in court the key is mine [...] letsencrypt only verifies domain ownership, with other words whether you have control over the domain. They do not verify any personal information. ...


4

A: Authentication only. You can still do "null" encryption afterwards, if you like. But if you do non-null encryption, then you'll have an idea of who with you're doing that. That's the authentication part. -- There used to be a time when SGC, Server-Gated-Cryptography, was a thing. An extra bit in the certificate would either allow or disallow any decent ...


0

To answer Q3, Verisign's public key (actually its root certificate) is included in your web browser, along with a lot of other root certificates.



Top 50 recent answers are included