Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

32

http://www.irongeek.com/i.php?page=security/wargames WebGoat. WebGoat is a set of deliberately insecure Java server pages http://www.hackthissite.org/ http://www.smashthestack.org/wargames from their FAQ The Smash the Stack Wargaming Network hosts several Wargames. A Wargame in our context can be described as an ethical hacking environment that ...


22

There is no technical way to get the ip-address of someone sending an email via the gmail web interface. Google does not put it into the email headers. And there is no API to query gmail for it. If you really need that IP address for valid reasons, you need to go the legal way.


16

This can potentially be done through some sort of social engineering, if you can send an email back to the original sender and get them to click on a link in the email. You need to set up a website which logs the visitor's IP address, then somehow make the person who sent you that email visit your site. This probably involves sending them an email and ...


15

There's a couple of options for setting up a test network to work on. There's a good list of known vulnerable operating systems in this question, which includes DVL and Metasploitable. In terms of getting them set-up as servers on your network you primarily need some working virtualization software. Not sure what the problems you're having with Virtualbox ...


12

Metasploitable and UltimateLAMP-0.2 are great target virtual machines to test against.


11

Backing up the TrueCrypt container means that you'll end with a time line of your encrypted volume, and all of those versions share the same key. Have different versions of the container with the same key gives the adversary two advantages: Information leakage: The adversary will know which sectors of the volume changed. and, as a consequence, a compromise ...


9

It is very good that the mysql server is not required to support remote connections because it greatly reduces the attackable surface. But you should consider defence in depth as a strategy to slow down an attacker or even reduce the impact of an attack. Setting up a good password for the database users is no significant amount of work, so you should do ...


9

If you are using SSL, see this technote for details. In particular, it is important to set up your security layers The three available security layers are: SSL (TLS 1.0) SSL (TLS 1.0) will be used for server authentication and for encrypting all data transferred between the server and the client. Negotiate The most secure ...


9

The answer depends on your level of sophistication, the level of sophistication of the attacker, and your goals. The Mandiant blog post, from one of the leading providers of incident response and computer forensics services, is intended for sophisticated organizations responding to an Advanced Persistent Threat (APT). One of their concerns is that you ...


8

What a great question. I think this is one of the things that divides the games industry- do you centralise your servers to keep control over them, but then suffer from lack of flexibility to gamer needs and be accused of ruling with an iron fist or do you give control over to the gamer population and run the risk of malicious or tainted servers. Three ...


8

From their own FAQ: Q: Has your secure datagram protocol been audited by experts? A: No. Mosh is actively used and has been read over by security-minded crypto nerds who think its design is reasonable, but any novel datagram protocol is going to have to prove itself, and SSP is no exception. We use the reference implementations of AES-128 and OCB, and we ...


6

You don't. If a device is in your physical possession, then you can have unlimited access to it. If it is someone else's physical possession, then they have unlimited access to it. If you want to protect yourself from them, then don't let them have your server.


6

Similar to what @AviD said: if you can somehow determine that this compromised app/host/network is actively in progress with another attack, it might be wise to at least pull the network cable, right? This also assumes that you cannot control the attack in some other way, or that things have gotten extremely out of control. This probably precludes any ...


6

I have tried to set up a server in to the same machine (through virtualbox) and make it as target but it failed Using virtual machines is probably the right way to solve the problem - if you'd said why you'd failed to get these up and running, then maybe you could get some help solving these problems (serverfault might be a more appropriate place to ...


5

GMail does send the IP-address in its mail headers: check the X-Originating-IP header.


5

This is the classic use case for a Virtual Private Network (VPN). If you're technically savvy, you could set up your own VPN server at home. Strongswan is the one packaged with Ubuntu. Or, you could use a third party VPN provider. Obviously though you have to find one you trust with your data. Note also that they won't typically get you inside your home ...


5

There is a time-proven strategy: learn, and then learn more. Go to the library, read technical specifications, spend time (thousands of hours at least) programming and trying things on your own computer. In the long run, this works better than just asking on the 'Ternet. Alternative strategy: bribe the sysadmin. History teaches us that more places were ...


4

If you are conversant with network administration, another good tool to set up a VPN of your own is OpenVPN. You run an OpenVPN server on your server, and an OpenVPN client on your laptop, and then you have a secure VPN between the two. I have spent some time with the OpenVPN source code in the past, and I was impressed: my conclusion was that OpenVPN is ...


4

It seems highly unlikely that you'll be able to be confident of answers that you get directly from the server you don't trust. Seems like you need a third party to vouch for it. E.g. find a way to get a cloud service provider to attest to the fact that the operator has loaded a given iso image on some standard hardware and has subsequently only communicated ...


4

A NAS is a computer. It has a "smaller" CPU (usually an ARM in the 200 MHz range) but it still runs a "normal" operating system (often a Linux derivative) with all its normal software and assorted vulnerabilities. When a SSH server has a buffer overflow, it is vulnerable, even if the outer box does not "look like" a computer. To be considered secure, a NAS, ...


4

In theory a NAS (which I assume is what you mean by "server as hard disk") is no different from a traditional file server in it's operation. They are both computers running an OS with a bunch of hard disks. There is no underlying reason why one or the other might be more secure. In practice, it all depends on you. A NAS comes pre-built, whereas you build a ...


3

You may be interested in seccomp. This is a feature with which Linux runs a process with only a very limited set of available system calls; the kernel kills the process at any attempt to execute any other call. This is, conceptually, the Right Way to do this kind of isolation: use a (small) whitelist of allowed system calls, instead of a blacklist of ...


3

Useful answer over here by Robert Moir - some very good chat on Serverfault on this.


3

Just for fun I'll note that there was a great live public test of an Internet Voting package before the 2010 election in DC. But its over now so you can't join in the fun. It helped some security researchers at the University of Michigan teach election administrators some great lessons on how Internet Voting is a world-class unsolved security problem ...


3

When doing any kind of web based authentication you always want to perform the action over an encrypted channel. So, yes. Get a cert and turn it on. You shouldn't have any problems. Forbidding access to the server itself, when using machine accounts, is definitely doable but can sometimes be tricky depending on your exact use-cases. First, make sure the ...


3

In principle, there are technical solutions. You could make sure your servers all contain a TPM, and use remote attestation to have the server attest to each client that it is running the legitimate server-side software. However, in practice there are significant engineering challenges, which may make this approach not terribly realistic, or more expensive ...


2

I'll add some info to @ChristopherHaynes answer. I also run some server for web purpose mainly and here's what I do : First of all, I create a new user with non admin rights. Then, I update the sshd_config file in order to : Disallow root access Change the port for SSH Allow ONLY the user I want (aka, the one I created in the first step) I say that ...


2

If you're running cPanel and have root (which it reads as if you do), install this free script, called CSF: http://www.configserver.com/cp/csf.html There are several tools to check your servers security and in most cases, this software will tell you where to go, to "harden" your cPanel install. It's not a end-all-be-all to your cPanel security but it most ...


2

Try replacing s_string('fuzz') with s_string('fuzz', encoding='utf_8') I think you can replace utf_8 with any other encoding that Python knows about. Or, try defining a group with s_group() and specifying an explicit list of values you want it to try using.


2

VPN is always an option, since everyone else has already covered that, I'll not repeat the details. I'll tell you a easier and quicker way: SOCKS proxy From the requirement point of view, all you require is a SSH server running at your home computer/server that you trust. Once that is set, this is your workflow: You create a local socks proxy server on ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible