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16

The first and main thing is to ensure that the firewall on your host is configured to properly drop incoming packets with source or destination address set to 127.0.0.1. Under normal circumstances, there should be no packet coming from the network and showing such addresses. However an attacker may attempt to forge such packets in order to reach your local ...


8

A potential vulnerability would be to compromise a low-privilege account/service and use that as a pivot to access the localhost-bound service. I usually prefer UNIX sockets for that purpose as you can apply user/group permissions on them (that will be transparently handled by the OS, the user won't have to keep yet another password). Plus, they're also a ...


6

If the service provides a web interface it might be vulnerable to CSRF attacks, XSS attacks or "same site" scripting. All of these can be triggered by just visiting the attackers external website, which by itself might be caused by malvertising or phishing. For these attacks it does not matter if the service is listening only on localhost, because it is only ...


1

The answer depends on different factors. A few that may or may not apply: What protocol is it? (For example UDP is more prone to security issues in this case as it works statelessly and you might achieve something with a single spoofed packet). Do you consider attacks or only data access. (See above: you might be able to do a DoS attack for a faulty UDP ...


1

Also consider that the hostname localhost is not exactly the same as the IP 127.0.0.1 (it naturally needs to be resolved first), and in most situations relies on either an entry in the hosts file or a resolver/dns server capable of resolving 127.0.0.1. So, be sure you can strictly specify 127.0.0.1 instead of localhost when implementing security measures, ...



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