Hot answers tagged

10

Internet service providers do typically keep a detailed record of which dynamic IP address is assigned to which customer at any given time. However, in general they will only give out this information to law enforcement if they receive a court order, to protect privacy. As for MAC address, the ISP probably also knows the MAC address of the home router used ...


6

The DHCP server logs will have a record of what MAC address was issued with what IP address in the past. I do this in my own corporate network to look for anomalies. But your question is about public IP addresses. The same principle applies, and this data is not public information: you'd have to get access to the logs of the networking devices. So, for the ...


2

Since NAT allows only replies to outbound connection no direct attacks from outside to inside are possible. But simple denial of service attacks are still possible. And while (D)DOS does not affect the inside network directly it can lead to a denial of critical services which need the access to the outside, like phone (VoIP) or smart home services. ...


1

... a router without a firewall ... using MASQUERADE Masquerading is not a routing functionality because it changes the source of the packet. Instead you actually need a stateful firewall to do the masquerading. Which means that if masquerading is involved you must also have a firewall there. This of course says nothing about the configuration of the ...


1

You don't appear to be as aware of the networking as you think. But let's go anyway. First, nothing stops you from assigning 111.222.xxx.xxx as your PC IP address. It's your PC after all, you can put anything you want. But you will accomplish nothing with this. Why? A lot of reasons: Default gateway: You probably aren't on the 111.222.xxx.xxx network ...


1

I.e without access to others computer. I'm assuming that you mean that A cannot access the computer of B and B not of A, but they can access other computers on the internet. Since information are not exchanged directly between parties but involve multiple hops there are several ways to intercept the data. Just to give you an idea what can be done here ...


1

TOR fulfils both your requirements quite nicely. Additionally, for your first point, there was no routing protocol used, as such - attackers would literally connect to a 2nd machine, and from there connect to a third etc - using plain old TCP/IP.


1

The real AS to feed a false route is any AS along the AS path: 7908 --> 20080 --> 1251 --> |28571| |52888| --> 6447 you see in the 2 wrong announces of route to: 8.8.8.8/32 Hence all traffic toward 8.8.8.8/32 shoud be routed since this attack through ASes: |28571| |52888| --> 1251 --> 20080 --> 7908 ...


1

The only real reason to prevent a network from being routable through a firewall is to make sure it's isolated both from external and internal unauthorized access. It's impossible for someone to hack into a system if there is no physical path for electrons to travel from their position to the target system's position. By unplugging any cables linking the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible