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From my limited point of view, an attacker would not be able to immediately gain access to the database. The data source in your snippet refers to a database server on 10.#.#.#. The 10.0.0.0/8 network is reserved for private networks according to RFC 1918. If you are an external attacker without direct access to the private Network the database server is ...


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Just because you were not able to connect directly, this still poses a few problems (will speak on them in a second). Anything and all should always be reported for a few reasons, it is informational, it illustrates that time was taken to analyze information during an engagement. Now there are a few reasons I can think of, for this happening (permissions)" ...


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Using MD5 for consistency checking is a clear violation of CWE-327: Use of a Broken or Risky Cryptographic Algorithm. Any protection that RFC-2387 provided, is voided by the use of an outdated, and insecure algorithm. Rapid7 is making the internet less secure with this recommendation. This BS "vulnerability" is more pointless noise that drowns out real ...


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I understand this is an attempt to baseline your network, but in order to do so, you need to identify the applications and protocols that your business or agency depends upon. Catalog those; identify the servers, ports and acceptable client ranges. If you cannot identify what the mission depends upon and what is authorized to access those resources, then ...


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Instead of having Snort listen on an interface, you can give it a packet capture to read. Snort will read and analyze the packets as if they came off the wire. See http://manual.snort.org/node8.html This would help you understand the packets that Snort detected.



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