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1) Yes, it is possible to breach Google Chrome. Even with the encryption, there would be somewhere password or private key. 2) It is not secure as not using autofill, however, you do not type in the autofill your CVV code, which is needed for a successful operation with the card. You can find more about CVV here: https://www.cvvnumber.com/


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Is it possible for breaching google chrome and take my credit card information? Yes. As long as Chrome can use your number for auto completion, it has to be possible for Chrome to access it. If one program on your computer can do this, another program or a least humans can do it too. it's not stored with any type of encryption Even with ...


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Having a good password to protect the system is a core safety feture. I agree that you should lock it under password and add. However the critick is ill fit. I agree whit the statement that its much easyer to phisicly damage the system on the location that bother to use the computer. Still the computer is vunreable from outside the LAN.


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Protection of the machines are in most cases not against physical destruction, but against data stealing. If others have physical access to the machine, real protection is impossible. BIOS passwords can be easily overriden by plugging out the power, dismantling the machine at taking out the bios battery for around a half minute. This resets the bios, ...


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It sounds like the worst that could happen directly to you is your trains get damaged. If you don't mind, then you're right and security isn't necessary since you won't be bothered. If you want to save some time/energy and prevent that from occurring greatly, just add a password to the computer. It should only take a few seconds and I personally don't see ...


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Security is necessary in order to counteract "risks" to a system. You need to determine what those risks are and if "loss" in that area is acceptable. Presumably, this train set up is not public, but in a locked building where people need a key to enter, or if allowed in, are monitored by other people watching. Yes, it is possible for someone to come in ...


2

In general, any computer that has the capability to go online needs to be secured. This includes not only "laptops" and other things people consider to be computers, but thermostats, sprinkler controls, and any other programmable device. The problem may or may not be what the attacker can do to you, but also what the attacker can use your computer to do to ...


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I use a tool from a vendor that does exactly this. It's basically a set of regex applied the the text of the domain name to permutate over variations. Can it be fooled? Of course. If you only use string manipulation, then one can figure out the manipulation patterns and devise domain names that meet the attack criteria. The trouble for the phishers here ...


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I'm not sure the answer to your actual question - for example whether it is possible for a tool to distinguish between www.google.com and www.gooogle.com and alert the user of a phishing attempt. The best protection would be a browser based password manager. This will only offer login credentials for matching sites. So if the user goes to www.google.com ...


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As mentioned by curious_cat in the comments, https connections should help as the identity of the website is then validated. There are several client side tools that attempt to identify the content of the website by using a browser plugin: Phishtank, Web of Trust, Avast! Popular web browsers also come with some sort of mechanism to try to identify phishing ...


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A common phishing website looks extremely similar to the website it is trying to impersonate, but is still a different website. One could develop a tool which examines any websites the user visits and alerts them when they look exactly identical to one of the websites is set $S$. Unfortunately there is a problem with this: A phishing website only needs to ...



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