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You can refer to this document http://dl3.checkpoint.com/paid/a6/CP_R75_IdentityAwareness_AdminGuide.pdf?HashKey=1406609615_673007d65df939c943ee67df223fe99e&xtn=.pdf. It is checkpoint's feature to do what you want. The basic idea is simple. Monitor DC's windows event log for user's logon message. There are specifc event types for user logon event. ...


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If someone has access to your bash history there might be other things to worry about. Anyway, you should not have sensitive information like passwords in you history. Thats why programs like mysql or passwd promt for password instead of taking it as parameter.


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Your keys might be safe, depending among others on the encryption used and how strong user passwords are. But there's a way to make it much safer : don't store them. In your system as you describe it, there is no reason not to let the client take care of the whole encryption/decryption. Thus, the server has no point in knowing user encryption keys. Storing ...


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Complexity is the enemy of security. So is giving up control of the valuable bits, like keys, when it isn't necessary. As I understand it, your scheme works something like this: User starts client app that can access encrypted local files User enters a) username and b) password User name and password are transmitted to server Server authenticates user ...


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A possibility would be to use 'sudo' (or a script / alias relying on it). Thanks to sudo, you can allow your users to temporarily use another (not necessarily root) in order to execute a very specific command: Create a new account which will own the private key, Configure sudo so your users can launch an SSH client using this account and its private key. ...



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