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Do "they" have physical access to the machine? There was an old utility called "passprop" which would lockout the local admin account from being brute forced over the network, but would still allow one to login locally with the admin credentials.


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The server should do validation on the user submitted file. E.g. If you allow the user to upload an image file for their profile picture, you should make sure that the file is a JPEG or PNG file and not an EXE file. More info : http://www.waytocode.com/2012/file-uploading-validation-in-php/ If you are running a file sharing service and allow all types of ...


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I don't agree with the above answer by Tom - perhaps the behaviour could depend based on different products where it's hosted. I had done the same in IIS 6 many years ago; I've had TWO intermediate CA certificates (primary and secondary) and one root CA certificate. I placed all of them in the root CA store. During certificate authentication, the behaviour ...


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If you put the intermediate CA certificate in the "trusted root" store, then you are instructing your machine to actually trust that certificate ex nihilo. You have turned it into a trusted root. When, for instance, your Web browser tries to validate a certificate issued by that "intermediate" CA, it will accept it with a chain which begins with that CA, ...


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"Proxy server" is an imprecise term. You have to think about what the proxy server is protecting to determine where it fits on the network. For example, web proxy servers used to channel outbound web surfing are often placed on internal networks rather than DMZs - their connections are outbound and they pose no additional "threat" to the internal network - ...


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Your first priority: repression. Make sure that your security is tight and no more information is leaked. Second priority: repair. Don't try to fight the criminal yourself. Go to the police and report a crime. Most police forces have a digital forensic team that can do the things needed. Let's just hope that they have the time/resources/priority to look ...


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Being disconnected results in an annoyance for legitimate users if we make a mistake coding the "misbehavior detection" With proper code review, mistakes like these can be avoided. Killing the client eliminates the need for "clean up" response code. Although it is important to "kill" a malicious client in order to prevent further issues, personally, ...



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