Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

To put you on the right track, we must first take you out of the wrong track. In your case: If you think "268 + 268 + 108", then you are thinking wrong. That would be the count of possible passwords, assuming that a password is either a sequence of eight uppercase letters, OR a sequence of eight lowercase letters, OR a sequence of eight digits. But that's ...


0

Question (a) There are (26+26+10)^8 different passwords = 218,340,105,584,896. Call that the dictionary_size. The attacker can test 4*10^6 per second => tests_per_hour: (60*60)*4*10^6 = 14,400,000,000 On average he will have to test half the dictionary, to find the average password solution: dictionary_size / 2 / tests_per_hour = 7581.25 hours. ...


0

The question isn't asking you to relate the answers to A and C, it's only saying that an attacker would realize that A is not the most efficient solution if he has more than one batch of passwords to guess, because he can get more than one use out of a rainbow table of 8 character SHA-256 hashed words. So you need to compute the number of possible ...


0

It's asking how many bytes of storage are necessary to store all possible hashes and one password that hashes to it. The way to look at this is to calculate the total number of passwords, then multiply that by the total space required to store both the password and its hash. So, if you have 10 possible passwords requiring 1byte to store each, and you ...



Top 50 recent answers are included