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1

My best understanding of your question is: Given a hash, from a known hashing function, if I apply the hash to itself any number of times, shall I ever receive the same number again? In that case the answer is "Possibly in a very,very,very,very long time depending on exactly what algorithm you use and how you use it." A word about multi-hashing At ...


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In short, no. You would have to essentially run a program to create random inputs into the hash function, and store the output, hoping that it (the output) matched what your target hash. The point of hashing functions is that they are one-way, meaning that given a hash value, it is computationally infeasible to generate the specific input that would ...


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No. Given some output x, any input m such that h(m) = x is called a preimage. Though there are a lot of possible preimage, finding any of them is unfeasible -- that is, if the hash function is indeed cryptographically strong. The three classical properties of cryptographic hash functions are: Resistance to preimages: given x, it is not feasible to find ...


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While memory-limited algorithms are discussed in the altcoin community ("alternative" cryptographic coins based on ideas similar to bitcoins), they do not primarily solve the disparity between a "low-end" general purpose computer (e.g. the RasPi) and a high-end general purpose computer, but they are used to prevent special-purpose hardware that exceed ...


1

I guess from reading old white papers out there, that only the self signed root CA Certificate is not affected by the SHA-1 deprecation plan and can still use SHA-1, as clients have other means to check for integrity of root certificates. All other certs should be replaced. Here is full description: ...



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