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Simply changing the representation of the message shouldn't reduce the entropy given the underlying meaning of the data shouldn't be altered. So for example, you could encode it into Base64 or ASCII without issue. However, to answer this question generally: How much can a function (such as the one below) modify an initially random string before that ...


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Key Usage error The key usage field shows exclamation mark because this field is marked as critical. This is not an error. why is it showing "Thumbprint alogrithm as "sha1" Beacuse the certificate thumbprint (the field below it) is created using SHA1.


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Bcrypt as stated in the Link is limited to 72 Characters. SHA256 may have an OUTPUT size of only 32 Bytes, It's Message input is ((2^64)-1)\8 or roughly 2305843009213693952 Bytes (assuming a char is 8 bits) To Bcrypt it's receiving a 32 Byte passphrase to encrypt, To SHA256 that could be a 400 Char data stream (IE password). So no, you're not losing ...


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The real danger is not structured guessing I think. Guessing takes to long for 30+ passwords or passphrases on average. But on average also implies they might have some luck on day 1, and you don't want your password to be the lucky one. The real danger are existing lists with millions of known passwords. Hashing them one by one and comparing the hash with ...


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No, a 30+ random character password is safe If your password is 30+ random characters, the number of possible passwords is well beyond 95^30, which is 2.14e59. The Oclhashcrack page gives a sample crack rate for SHA256 of 16,904 Mh/s. So lets assume the "budget equal to the world GDP" would allow for a million of these computers to perform the cracking. ...



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