New answers tagged

2

As others have explained, 'bits of entropy' refers to to the guess-ability of the original Password or other text that was first used to create the SHA-256 hash. In your example case the entropy is unchanged. What you've done here is provide an SHA-1 version and an MD5 version of the SHA-256. This makes the SHA-256 more guessable than other solutions you ...


18

And it is longer than the input string, with 288bit instead of 256bit. So did we actually increased the entropy? No, you did not increase the entropy. In this context, "entropy" basically refers to the probability of any particular guess about the content or value being correct. If I tell you that I have hashed a single lowercase US English letter's ...


2

You are certainly not adding entropy. You still only will have at most 256bit entropy possible outputs of this schema, no matter how many times and how you rehash this. Note that you will have at most 256 bit entropy, because you did not told us about how much entropy is in your input. SHa256 will also not give you 256bit entropy if you have less than that ...


0

did you increase the entropy... most likely not. All you did is use 2 older hashing functions to get a new hash. since this has no new data, entropy is not affected. The amount of bits here makes no differences whatsoever (since its just 'another way o writing' the original hash.) Entropy (in cryptography) has to do with the amount of uncertainty a ...


0

There is an attack vector called rainbow tables attack. In it the attacker cross references the md5 sum against a database of known md5 hashes. You don't need to run brute force always. I believe that this file was populated using this technique.



Top 50 recent answers are included