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As well as malware, as already indicated in Evander Consus's answer, the risks include being compromised by any of the cross-domain exploits should any vulnerabilities exist on sites you trust and are possibly logged into: e.g. Cross-site scripting. Cross-site request forgery. Session fixation i.e. Client-site attacks on the sites you use. See the ...


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What risks do you have? Possibly that your computer is now infected with malicious software like a virus or a trojan horse. The following steps should be taken if you didn't already. What to do? There are some steps you can take: First of all, don't click on links that you don't trust or know Use unshortenit.it or urlex.org to check where the ...


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As far as I know, there haven't been leaks or admissions that Skype uses this kind of technology. However, other techniques can be used. First, law enforcement agencies can ask Skype to give them certain data about a Skype account: In response to a subpoena or other court order, Skype will provide: • Registration information provided at time of ...


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Skype itself must be installed in a dedicated VM with nothing else on it to prevent attacks and data leakage. Tor router must drop all the UDP packets, so Skype will fall back to TCP. And in this case the only problem is that Skype calls can be wiretapped by Skype itself. No other data leaks will be possible


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I'm not sure it's documented anywhere exactly what info is collected and sent back to MS via Skype, but to quote Tor's wiki page on IM software: Skype usage is highly discouraged. It can be used for leak testing purposes as it's very good with firewall tunneling. Skype is closed source and users have no control over the encryption keys used. Skype ...



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