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If the malware is same as the one identified as Andr/FBILock-A by anti-virus firm Sophos, they have detailed removal instructions here: http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2014/07/25/android-fbi-lock-malware-how-to-avoid-paying-the-ransom/ It appears that (according to Sophos) this malware does not actually encrypt files, so you may be the victim of some other ...


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You can recovery your files from your backup. A backup protects you in case the drive gets corrupted, the device is missing and also if you lost or never had the password for the encryption. Also note that you should encrypt the backup. But from your question I guess you don't have a backup and I am sorry to tell you that you most likely lost your data. ...


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An online decryption tool is available from FireEye: https://www.decryptcryptolocker.com/ The thing to note here is that it is specific to certain types of Ransomwares. If you are encrypted by a new variant of Ransomware then it might not decrypt.


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It is possible, even without a hacker's technical skills but with a bit of planning ahead. Multiple apps allow you to remotely control your own phone, which implies that you must install them yourself to your phone. Let's call your client Alice and her husband Bob. Let's assume Alice owns an Android. It's fair to assume that Bob knows the PIN/gesture to ...


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In theory yes, there are a number of scenarios where this could potentially happen, for example installing malware on the phone either in advance or through some exploit, or even just having an accomplice do it. In practice though unless the husband has some pretty advanced technical chops (or really good connections, think military or secret service), ...



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