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0

I guess the policy is there to prevent virus infections because the computers are a Group resource and not a personal resource (eg, employees can take any PC that is available, the employee does not have a assigned "own" PC for the whole employment period). In this case, I would recommend running some sort of kiosk/readonly solution. One example is booting ...


0

This is where company and security policies can come in handy if you don't want to get all too technical. However if you do not require the need to write to mass storage devices via USB then you can simply edit the registry to only allow for devices to read via USB. Although, if you're staff do need the ability to read/write there are other registry related ...


5

There are potential technical options you can pursue, and several of those have been mentioned in other answers, such as global policies or BIOS settings to disable the USB ports, or physically disabling the USB ports. However... My suggestion is that if you have a systemic problem with this sort of thing, it isn't, in fact a technical problem at all, but ...


0

The problem with this is the availability of USB ports... if the USB ports no longer work, then they will stop trying it. I know there are group policies that disallow the use of USB ports through the OS, but I'm not too familiar with if there is a policy that will disable them entirely. If not, then you might be able to either A) disable USB in BIOS or B) ...


-1

Alright, ultimately the sensible answer is to provide charging points for everyone at the desk, so noone gets tempted. And, I'm sure you have a group policy in place that stops you from doing anything right? In linux, you could probably implement this as one of the udev rules.


-1

Glue the usb connector shut. No BYOD. Put it in writing, and have a workshop.


1

Short answer - no. Currently there is no mechanism that would allow someone to clone your SIM card without having physical access to it. A number of cheap and commercially available devices (e.g. this SIM MAX for $7.50) can clone your SIM card with relative ease - that is, if you place your SIM card inside the device and it extracts the KI. What you're ...


0

Hypothetically yes. At the lowest level all cellphones have a proprietary baseband controller, which means that if a vulnerability is discovered in some portion of the controller that controls calls, the call could be an attack vector. http://www.extremetech.com/computing/170874-the-secret-second-operating-system-that-could-make-every-mobile-phone-insecure ...



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