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If you are afraid of "snooping" then why would you use signatures ? A "snooper" is a passive eavesdropper, who wants to see the data but certainly not to make you aware that your emails are inspected. They won't alter emails, or send fake emails, which are the kind of things that signatures can help against. If you want to defeat such sniffing, then you ...


1

It very much depends on what you mean with "legal risks". For example in Europe there is something called a "qualified signature". If something, a document, email etc, is signed with a qualified signature, it has full legal binding. You cannot deny having signed it (at least the proof is on the signers side that he/she did not voluntarily signed the ...


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Signing emails is useful only insofar as recipients verify the signature. Theoretically, signing the emails might improve deliverability, but only if a recipient configures his filters for incoming emails to verify email signatures and accept emails which have been verified to come from you. However, this is only theoretical; in practice, email filtering is ...


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You can't do this as private key crypto exists as the key pair generated uses the input (which varies). You'd need an algorithm (logrithmic?) That produces the same output each time, something that disregarded the input. You lose the very thing you're trying to accomplish, "signing" or the ability to provide non - repudiation. Why on earth would this ...


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You can't do this as private key crypto exists as the key pair generated uses the input (which varies). You'd need an algorithm (logrithmic?) That produces the same output each time, something that disregarded the input. You lose the very thing you're trying to accomplish, "signing" or the ability to provide non - repudiation. Why on earth would this ...


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How to generate a CSR using an existing keypair depends largely on the software you are using. There is however technically speaking no reason it should not work. May I ask why you want to reuse the same keypair for all certificates? With openssl you can specify which private key to use so if you generate a private key one and use the same private key for ...



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