Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

50

Yes they can but unless your neighbor has the required technical expertise, its highly doubtful. To view incoming and outgoing traffic you need specific software to monitor network packets and the tech knowledge to actually do it. Most routers only keep a syslog and unless they are using software like wireshark to monitor/capture your packets, they cannot ...


42

The entire point of SSL is its resistance to eavesdropping by man-in-the-middle attacks like the one you're proposing. If you cannot make the client device trust your self-signed certificate, then your only options are: Intercept an initial HTTP request and never let the communication be upgraded to HTTPS (but this will not work if the if the client ...


40

If you get a VPN and use that for browsing, that will hide all your traffic from both your neighbour and their ISP.


30

What about using tor? Keep in mind that your speed will be affected*. As other people said, using any private mode in your browser is not going to be of any help. *EDIT: The slowdown heavily depends on the network topology, the number of nodes, how much traffic the nodes are handling and what you are downloading. Here you can find some explanations about ...


25

Yes they can actually. What it boils down to is that they can see which websites you are running by looking at: Clear HTTP traffic DNS requests sent One thing you could do is purchase an encrypted VPN and run all your internet traffic through the VPN. This way your neighbours will not be able to see what you are doing.


11

In practice, it depends on the router they're using (and, specifically, on the firmware it's running). Basically all home WiFi routers have the technical ability to log visited URLs, as long as their firmware includes such a feature (and it's not exactly a complicated one). The main questions are: whether the router firmware supports such a logging ...


11

When my laptop is using a network I don't control (basically anything that's not home) it wears pretty red socks to reroute all traffic into the SOCKS5 proxy built into OpenSSH and then to a server I rent anyways for my website to protect my traffic. You can use tor as well but I intensely dislike tor (for reasons off topic here). This is the socks_up ...


11

Any suggestions? Is is doable? You need to own a certificate trusted by the device to intercept the traffic. How this can be achieved depends on how proper and open the certificate validation on the device is. The device might have a buggy or non-existing validation of certificates. This is typically No validation at all, in which case you could use ...


9

As you guessed, Facebook uses HTTPS, what that means is that requests to Facebook.com regardless of whether they are GET or POST requests are not sent over HTTP, instead they are sent over HTTPS in an encrypted form which the 'http' filter in Wireshark wont be able to display as regular HTTP requests. If you want to view the encrypted HTTPS traffic including ...


5

If I understand correctly, your connection to the Internet gateway is wired and everyone else is WiFi. If that is the case, the WiFi users cannot capture your FTP credentials because there is no need for the WiFi AP to transmit them, and it won't. But really, the answer is to convince the people at the other end to replace FTP with SFTP.


3

nmap has the ability to guess the operating system by looking at variations in how a device reacts to TCP/IP probes (see the nmap website for details). You can also make a guess at the identity of a device by looking at who its MAC address was allocated to. For example, something with an address in a Hewlett-Packard block is probably a network printer.


3

Free software to demodulate the signal exists, see http://bellard.org/linmodem.html For the physical signal acquisition on first approximation I'd use a digital oscilloscope, something like https://www.sparkfun.com/products/11219 but it should be possible to do it a lot cheaper unless you plan to reuse it for other projects. If you can cut the line two ...


3

In a WiFi network, all information which is sent over the network is broadcasted over the air. Usually network interfaces are configured to just ignore any network traffic not addressed to them, but there are tools available which change them to "promiscuous mode" which allows them to also log and show any traffic which they receive even though it is ...


3

In "Promiscous mode", the driver still outputs standard ethernet frames belonging to the one wireless network you are currently associated to (identified by the BSSID). Possibly the device will only dump packets from the AP to wireless devices, but not packets from wireless clients to the AP, as receiving packets from non-AP devices is not used in AP client ...


3

Can This be done? I would say yes, but with some caveats. Depending on the cable and the data, you would need some very expensive / sensitive equipment to pull this off. To me this is a similar issue to the old Van Eck Phreaking (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_Eck_phreaking). Intel has some tech to circumvent this kind of attack: ...


3

No, the very nature of HTTPS is that the certificate is required to decrypt it. You could sniff the traffic, but it would be encrypted and useless to you.


3

No. This is the point of SSL, to prevent this kind of unauthorized snooping. To authorize your proxy you need to tell the device to trust the proxy certificate, and tell the device clients to trust your certificate or use the devices private key, which it sounds like you don't have access to. For more information: ...


3

Take a Look at the FREAK tls vulnerability. you should be able to inject data into the SSL negotiation to trick the device into a RSA Export cipher, and from there the decryption of traffic by a man in the middle is significantly easier ( aka possible. ) Charles is written in java, shouldn't be too hard to modify to exploit this automatically.


3

I would recommend using Fiddler for this instead. First you will need to MITM yourself though as Facebook sends this request over HTTPS. You can do this in fiddler by going to Tools -> Fiddler Options -> HTTPS and ticking: Capture HTTPS Connects Decrypt HTTPS Traffic Then you will see a scary warning, as shown below: Clicking Yes will install an ...


3

If user B is in same network, so he can use ARP poisoning for capturing the data that transfer from user A to the server. This type of attack called MITM ( man in the middle) attack. But if user B is not in the same network, the only way is that installs a backdoor or trojan on the computer of A. Anothe way is that before that user A open web browser, user ...


2

As others have said, it is very easy indeed and there are many simple tools available for intercepting data in the clear. It is also very common. The delivery of malware is generally automated and industrial in scale, many 10's of thousands of machines in a typical botnet. Targeted attacks are more limited in scale but are generally not discovered for ...


2

'How common' is not answerable or useful - you need to look at your risk. 'How easy' is much simpler to answer. It is incredibly easy if you are on the same network segment as an endpoint, but it is also easy if you can compromise a router or switch. So, if you have data communications that are a target for an attacker, then they will work out how much ...


2

No, this is not the case. A certificate signed by a CA contains only the public key, but for decrypting you need the private key too. This private key is not needed for the CA to sign the key, so they usually don't have it either. But, some CA offer to simplify the process of certificate generation by generating a key pair for the certificate too. In this ...


2

These days basic Software Defined Radio (SDR) kit has become very affordable so you can now obtain the RTL-SDR USB stick for about $15 and perform some GSM sniffing on a standard laptop running Wireshark. The GSM capture is done using the RTL-SDR and the airprobe tool (which builds on GnuRadio) that relays the packets to Wireshark, via the GSMTAP port (UDP ...


2

The reason you're getting this is because you load certain resources over HTTP. When you look at the page source code, you'll see this: <link rel='stylesheet' id='google-font-body-css' href='http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans+Condensed&#038;ver=4.1.1' type='text/css' media='all' /> <link rel='stylesheet' ...


2

HTTP is an inherently "trusting" protocol: it contains little or no built-in security. This means that it is susceptible to the following: Traffic monitoring Anything transmitted over HTTP can be intercepted and read by anyone connected to any network sitting between the source device and the target server. Traffic redirection and manipulation With little ...


2

These types of question has depends answers. The answer varies depending on the policies of owner of open WiFi and plans among other factors. but This question specially has 2 aspects: (second aspect may be your answer) First one: connecting people to an open WiFi network, without having the owner's permission and following his/her terms of service is ...


2

It depends on how the VPN is set up. One of the possible setups is the following: VPN connection to allow remote access to internal network servers of the company, but all other traffic is direct from you to the internet (so not routed through the VPN). All traffic is routed through the VPN making all traffic between you and the company secure. All other ...


1

Your friend is likely using a network packets capture tool like wireshark or tcpdump to collect data that are transferred from and to your machine. At least to make it hard to your friend you have to use services or websites that offer data encryption which is commonly implemented using TLS, for instance when you are browsing a website make sure the website ...


1

One thing you can do to view traffic is connect it to a router that supports packet forwarding and run wire shark or security onion on a sperate computer. I know using firewall rules on the router (installing dd-wrt will allow it) will accomplish this.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible