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33

First of all that would entirely depend on the encryption used by the access point. There are several types of possible encryption. Mostly on consumer wireless access points these are: WEP WPA WPA2 WPS WEP Let's first dive into WEP. WEP was the first algorithm used to secure wireless access points. Unfortunately it was discovered that WEP had some ...


23

Monitor mode: Sniffing the packets in the air without connecting (associating) with any access point. Think of it like listening to people's conversations while you walk down the street. Promiscuous mode: Sniffing the packets after connecting to an access point. This is possible because the wireless-enabled devices send the data in the air but only "mark" ...


16

You can't. It doesn't matter whether the wifi is encrypted or not: you can't know whether the access point is trustworthy. A WPA2 access point with a strong password doesn't help when the access point itself is a rogue access point put up by someone who may or may not be the café or hotel owner. And yes, it happens — people put up open access points with ...


15

Your case is common in the corporate world, it is usually described as corporate MiTM. When you connect to the Internet from inside your network, you're likely connecting to a gateway/router the belongs to your company first. That router can simply hand you public key in a "fake" certificate whenever you connect to an SSL-enabled site and fool your browser ...


13

Most likely yes, but it depends Much like PATA, SCSI, and Ethernet devices, USB devices don't directly connect to the computer. They connect to a Host Controller that manages all signaling and communication. All ports are connected to something called a Root Hub, and to each Root Hub you may connect other hubs and subsequently more hubs. Each of these hubs ...


12

Promiscuous Mode: Capture packets on a network that you have connected to. This is likely what you need to be in if you want to analyze packets (Wireshark, tcpdump, etc.) Monitor Mode: Capture packets regardless of connected network. No association to AP needed (and no authentication). Because it is not connected to a network, you can't process the ...


8

One thing to realise is that you can't completely block what you kids do on the Internet and probably the best thing to do is to try and educate them on avoiding sites you think they shouldn't visit and also how to recognise dangerous situations (e.g. strangers looking to message them or meet up in real life). That said there are products which can help to ...


7

Unless you shield your building completely, there is no way to determine if the signal is coming from in the room or from outside without triangulating the signal and there isn't a guaranteed way to force the phones to connect to your device instead of the actual cell tower. Depending on jurisdiction, this may or may not even be legal since it could cause ...


7

Sniffing and snooping should be synonyms. They refer to listening to a conversation. For example, if you login to a website that uses no encryption, your username and password can be sniffed off the network by someone who can capture the network traffic between you and the web site. Spoofing refers to actively introducing network traffic pretending to be ...


6

You can technically start sniffing away without "connecting" to the network. Terry is correct, if the network is open (no encryption, WEP/WPA/WPA2) then you can just "Join" the network and sniff the traffic. However, you do not need to join the network to sniff the traffic. WLANs use radio frequencies, all you have to do is match the freq (channel) and ...


5

I'm not aware of something that would turn your Android bluetooth radio into a sniffer. I think you would need to invest in an Ubertooth to accomplish what you're looking for. http://ubertooth.sourceforge.net/ http://hakshop.myshopify.com/products/ubertooth-one With the ubertooth you'll be able to sniff the bluetooth packets between your arduino devices.


5

Maybe you can see that it is indeed possible to send a secret over an untrusted path by the following (somehow simplifying but illustrative :-) example You don't trust the post office and want to send me a gift You can achieve it in the following way You put the gift in a box and lock it with YOUR lock You send the box to me and I additionally lock it ...


4

The first step in any sort of MITM attack on a network is connecting to the network. With a wired network, that involves somehow connecting your machine to the network through the use of an Ethernet cable. With a wireless network, you just need to connect to the network.. well, wirelessly. Without a requiring a password to connect to a wireless network, ...


4

You can use to normal wireless cards and change the mode to Monitor mode . Ralink and Atheros cheapests are best choices . Aircrack-ng's website have compatibility drivers page, since that proposed good device for WiFi sniffing data and raw packet injection, you can use that : Best wireless USB proposed devices


4

In short, the key is never directly sent over the wire. It is negotiated in a way that both parties can derive the same key, even though there is not enough data put on the wire to reconstruct it. For instance, in ECDH protocols, each side creates a unique public/private keypair. They then exchange public keys. By computing a mathematical operation on their ...


3

To answer whether the sniffer module runs in promiscuous mode by default I am doing a test in my lab right now and will update it here when its done. UPDATE The answer finally comes out to be YES. The sniffer module does its capturing in promiscuous mode. To test I set up a win-xp-sp2 (10.10.10.101) vm on proxmoxVE (kvm virtual env). I added it to a bridge ...


3

You can't detect if it's a wireless access point or not, what you can do is detect that a device was plugged in. With port security you can only allow your corporate devices to be plugged into the network whereas other detected apparatus will immediately cause the port to be shut down (white listing based on MAC address). Note that MAC spoofing is ...


3

The answer by Adnan is correct. However to complete the picture, for superspeed mode in Usb3.0, the packets downstream are routed by the hub instead of broadcast unlike usb2.0. Do note that the usb3.0 hub consists of the usb2.0 portion and a separate superspeed portion. The usb2.0 portion of the superspeed hub operates in broadcast mode as before. In ...


3

You should be able to just right click on any HTTP packet and select "Follow TCP Stream" which will rebuild the page. You could select the "Save As" and save it somewhere, e.g.: "captured-page.html" Edited to add more: Here is the walk through on Wireshark: http://www.wireshark.org/docs/wsug_html_chunked/ChAdvFollowTCPSection.html Your other option is to ...


3

If your switch supports port mirroring, I would definitely go that route. Port mirroring will essentially duplicate all traffic coming through the switch, and send it to a single port. You would then want to connect a machine to this port and run whichever packet capturing tool (such as Wireshark) for analysis. I wouldn't want to go with the ARP poisoning ...


3

Generally speaking, unless there's something specific that prevents them from doing so, then they can. Legally speaking, a contract might make this disallowed, but it's very unlikely that this would be in your contract. Similarly, local privacy laws might protect you. Either way, it's lawyer time - but how will you ever know? Technically speaking, ...


3

You can use TCP View which is usually used by investigators and security experts to determine the behavior of certain malware, where it's establishing connections/getting commands from, or more common use is to solve cases where an individual is spying on another by use of Webcam/Microphone etc, by tracing the IP address; an example use of TCPView in such ...


3

No, this attack is not feasible. Believe me, I've tried. Now when I say I've tried it, I was not writing a virus or something to steal passwords, I was writing software where the user was fully aware that they were using a custom DNS server which intentionally lied (based on their rules) in conjunction with a HTTP proxy. This is exactly what you describe, ...


3

SSL/TLS makes use of public key cryptography. This is the idea that we can have two cryptographic keys, one publicly known (pub), and one only known to the individual and never disclosed (priv). Lets say a user connects to a website with HTTPS (SSL/TLS). They send a request to the server, which responds with among other things, its x509 certificate which ...


3

Network traffic can be either unicast or broadcast (or multicast, but that's not relevant right now.) NBNS (NetBIOS Name Service) is broadcast, so the switch (your wireless "router" in this case) has a responsibility to deliver it to every host "attached" to it. Most other traffic is unicast, which means the switch should send it directly to the recipient. ...


2

Rory's answer is spot on however, OpenDNS is not the only answer. Kids will be kids and they can become curious, some can become tinkerers looking to bypass OpenDNS. This is trivial for say a tween/teen. There are also parental apps for iPhone, and for Android. So you could go a step further and install one of those. Education is always key and what I have ...


2

Mayank Sharma advice is technically right but might not work in most of the environments because organizations/individuals use network switches nowadays which route data only to the intended recipient. Wireshark would work only where network hubs are used which broadcast the traffic to every node in the network. In order to sniff traffic in switched ...


2

DSniff is a set of tools which do traffic analysis on the network. A machine which has DSniff installed can spy upon the local network and reveal every data element which is not protected. Nominally, SSL protects against that; that's what SSL was designed to do. One of the DSniff tools is webmitm, which purports to intercept and crack SSL connections -- it ...


2

The hash is not passed directly in the string of bits. It will not just be there to grab in one packet. In order to attack WPA/WPA2 you must capture the entire four-way handshake. The key itself is not really sent as part of the message, since both sides know the key, they just need to prove to each other they know it, not send a hash for verification. One ...


2

It depends on the exact encryption being used on the network, but for WEP (which is the easiest to break) it takes only minutes. The most common attack is the Fluhrer, Mantin and Shamir attack which involves looking for reused IVs(initialization vectors) which can potentially be used to reverse engineer parts of the key. They are supposed to be unique, but ...



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