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50

Yes they can but unless your neighbor has the required technical expertise, its highly doubtful. To view incoming and outgoing traffic you need specific software to monitor network packets and the tech knowledge to actually do it. Most routers only keep a syslog and unless they are using software like wireshark to monitor/capture your packets, they cannot ...


39

If you get a VPN and use that for browsing, that will hide all your traffic from both your neighbour and their ISP.


30

What about using tor? Keep in mind that your speed will be affected*. As other people said, using any private mode in your browser is not going to be of any help. *EDIT: The slowdown heavily depends on the network topology, the number of nodes, how much traffic the nodes are handling and what you are downloading. Here you can find some explanations about ...


25

Yes they can actually. What it boils down to is that they can see which websites you are running by looking at: Clear HTTP traffic DNS requests sent One thing you could do is purchase an encrypted VPN and run all your internet traffic through the VPN. This way your neighbours will not be able to see what you are doing.


11

When my laptop is using a network I don't control (basically anything that's not home) it wears pretty red socks to reroute all traffic into the SOCKS5 proxy built into OpenSSH and then to a server I rent anyways for my website to protect my traffic. You can use tor as well but I intensely dislike tor (for reasons off topic here). This is the socks_up ...


11

In practice, it depends on the router they're using (and, specifically, on the firmware it's running). Basically all home WiFi routers have the technical ability to log visited URLs, as long as their firmware includes such a feature (and it's not exactly a complicated one). The main questions are: whether the router firmware supports such a logging ...


8

Sniffing and snooping should be synonyms. They refer to listening to a conversation. For example, if you login to a website that uses no encryption, your username and password can be sniffed off the network by someone who can capture the network traffic between you and the web site. Spoofing refers to actively introducing network traffic pretending to be ...


5

If I understand correctly, your connection to the Internet gateway is wired and everyone else is WiFi. If that is the case, the WiFi users cannot capture your FTP credentials because there is no need for the WiFi AP to transmit them, and it won't. But really, the answer is to convince the people at the other end to replace FTP with SFTP.


4

If you can do it (with Wireshark or another tool), then any program that has the same privilege level as you can theoretically do it as well. So if the question is: can the loopback interface be sniffed? I'd reply YES. From what I know, it's more or less the reason why it was created in the first place.


3

Right, the corporate network admins implement a man-in-the-middle attack against the TLS client with their own CA so that they can see what's leaving their network. They will probably have a device that will create a certificate on the fly that is valid for gmail.com when you visit gmail.com. The reason they do this isn't to play Dr. Evil, it's so they can ...


3

Depending on the configuration of the network that you're on, it may be possible for administrators to view the contents of HTTPS connections (and possibly VPNs). It is obviously possible to intercept traffic on the network, but the usual problem is that they can't issue valid certificates for all the sites that you visit, so you would see a lot of ...


3

Network traffic can be either unicast or broadcast (or multicast, but that's not relevant right now.) NBNS (NetBIOS Name Service) is broadcast, so the switch (your wireless "router" in this case) has a responsibility to deliver it to every host "attached" to it. Most other traffic is unicast, which means the switch should send it directly to the recipient. ...


3

@Dimitris answer is a good answer. I think the problem can be more clear with some example: Sniffing: Any eavesdropping on existing traffic can be called sniffing, for example you can sniff your own traffic using a network sniffer, I think the WireShark is a good tool for this purpose. WireShark does not change the packets and only capure them and display ...


3

Free software to demodulate the signal exists, see http://bellard.org/linmodem.html For the physical signal acquisition on first approximation I'd use a digital oscilloscope, something like https://www.sparkfun.com/products/11219 but it should be possible to do it a lot cheaper unless you plan to reuse it for other projects. If you can cut the line two ...


3

nmap has the ability to guess the operating system by looking at variations in how a device reacts to TCP/IP probes (see the nmap website for details). You can also make a guess at the identity of a device by looking at who its MAC address was allocated to. For example, something with an address in a Hewlett-Packard block is probably a network printer.


3

In a WiFi network, all information which is sent over the network is broadcasted over the air. Usually network interfaces are configured to just ignore any network traffic not addressed to them, but there are tools available which change them to "promiscuous mode" which allows them to also log and show any traffic which they receive even though it is ...


3

In "Promiscous mode", the driver still outputs standard ethernet frames belonging to the one wireless network you are currently associated to (identified by the BSSID). Possibly the device will only dump packets from the AP to wireless devices, but not packets from wireless clients to the AP, as receiving packets from non-AP devices is not used in AP client ...


3

Can This be done? I would say yes, but with some caveats. Depending on the cable and the data, you would need some very expensive / sensitive equipment to pull this off. To me this is a similar issue to the old Van Eck Phreaking (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_Eck_phreaking). Intel has some tech to circumvent this kind of attack: ...


2

Are you looking to monitor packets between your computer as a client on the network and the router and other wireless clients and the router? If you're using windows, it looks like the answer is yes: you'll need to purchase Airpcap. http://ask.wireshark.org/questions/8504/supported-adapters-for-wireless-packet-capturing If you're attempting to monitor at ...


2

I'd like to suggest Ettercap, a free and open-source network security tool for man-in-the-middle attacks. I recently used its ARP spoofing functionality in an Ethical Hacking / Penetration Testing training, and was amazed how easy it is to set up. It's included in the Kali Linux distribution.


2

If the system runs the sniffer, its interface will be in promiscuous mode. The test works like this: Send a ping with the correct IP address into the network but with a wrong mac address. The sniffing host will answer the ping packet, as it will receive every packet in promiscuous mode. There is a ready-to use script in nmap to support this detection. ...


2

As others have said, it is very easy indeed and there are many simple tools available for intercepting data in the clear. It is also very common. The delivery of malware is generally automated and industrial in scale, many 10's of thousands of machines in a typical botnet. Targeted attacks are more limited in scale but are generally not discovered for ...


2

'How common' is not answerable or useful - you need to look at your risk. 'How easy' is much simpler to answer. It is incredibly easy if you are on the same network segment as an endpoint, but it is also easy if you can compromise a router or switch. So, if you have data communications that are a target for an attacker, then they will work out how much ...


2

No, this is not the case. A certificate signed by a CA contains only the public key, but for decrypting you need the private key too. This private key is not needed for the CA to sign the key, so they usually don't have it either. But, some CA offer to simplify the process of certificate generation by generating a key pair for the certificate too. In this ...


1

Yes, Wireshark will do the job. If you want to sniff your own mails just start it on the corresponding interface. If you want to sniff all mails in the network you have to somehow put yourself in a man in the middle position. You could use Cain for that if you have it installed anyway and it supports ARP poisoning, which is one possible method. After ...


1

As an alternative to VPN's and bundled secure proxying solutions, you can assemble a solution using just Secure Shell (SSH) and a HTTP proxy. Initiate an SSH session to a remote server where you have an account. As part of the SSH session, configure port forwarding: forward a local port on your machine to the address:port of some HTTP proxy which is ...


1

The only way to make it impossible for them to know what browsing you are doing is to use either a VPN or an SSL Proxy (things like Tor are a fancy form of proxy). Otherwise, they could potentially sniff the traffic as it passes through their router, and identify at least the hostnames you are connecting to, and (if it is not HTTPS) the actual URLs. Of ...


1

Unless you use a VPN to tunnel through their network, they can see your activity and the destination of your traffic, just like your ISP could. (They are effectively your ISP.) If you want to avoid them being able to see everything you are doing, you must encrypt your communications across their network. If you use a VPN, they will be able to tell you are ...


1

They could view/log any traffic that is sent in plaintext (not encrypted) over their network. Clearing your browser history only affects your local computer, and has no impact on what has occurred on the network.


1

I have used an ssh honeypot on a VM in my internal networks. It's a specialized honeypot that gives me information on 2 areas: Anyone attempting to log in on port 22 is a bad actor and I can correlate the connection info with my traffic logs. I can also see what credentials are attempted to see what accounts might be compromised. Once the user logs in (it ...



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