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42

The entire point of SSL is its resistance to eavesdropping by man-in-the-middle attacks like the one you're proposing. If you cannot make the client device trust your self-signed certificate, then your only options are: Intercept an initial HTTP request and never let the communication be upgraded to HTTPS (but this will not work if the if the client ...


11

Any suggestions? Is is doable? You need to own a certificate trusted by the device to intercept the traffic. How this can be achieved depends on how proper and open the certificate validation on the device is. The device might have a buggy or non-existing validation of certificates. This is typically No validation at all, in which case you could use ...


9

As you guessed, Facebook uses HTTPS, what that means is that requests to Facebook.com regardless of whether they are GET or POST requests are not sent over HTTP, instead they are sent over HTTPS in an encrypted form which the 'http' filter in Wireshark wont be able to display as regular HTTP requests. If you want to view the encrypted HTTPS traffic including ...


5

If I understand correctly, your connection to the Internet gateway is wired and everyone else is WiFi. If that is the case, the WiFi users cannot capture your FTP credentials because there is no need for the WiFi AP to transmit them, and it won't. But really, the answer is to convince the people at the other end to replace FTP with SFTP.


5

If you sniff on the exit node and the connection is not https/hidden service, then you will have the traffic in clear but you will not be able to know from who it came. Unless the traffic itself is revealing the identity. In other cases, as far as we know, you can't decrypt tor. As other said, tor will be useless if it was possible.


5

Yes. A Harris Stingray, Boeing DRT box, or other cell simulator can intercept SMS messages. These are monitoring devices that have secretly been used by police agencies for over a decade. They come with strict non-disclosure agreements where the agencies that purchase them are not even allowed to acknowledge their existence to the public, and certainly ...


4

According to scuzzy-delta, yes: It is possible to detect that someone on your network is using Tor (e.g. You're a network administrator at a workplace, and an employee is using it), and the fact that you're using it is in itself interesting information. His answer: http://security.stackexchange.com/a/27848/76663 Using a bridged TOR connection is a ...


4

You can intercept the traffic by building a bridge between the AP and the uplink. This can be done by using the bridgeutils and two network interfaces. The software side is described here. This will allow you to capture and view all traffic. You can then display the data in wireshark or use a transparent proxy to get the informations you want in a protocol ...


3

Take a Look at the FREAK tls vulnerability. you should be able to inject data into the SSL negotiation to trick the device into a RSA Export cipher, and from there the decryption of traffic by a man in the middle is significantly easier ( aka possible. ) Charles is written in java, shouldn't be too hard to modify to exploit this automatically.


3

If it is a PSTN line a simple tape recorder attached to the lines could do the trick. For ISDN I suspect you need a DAC but its also easy, as long as you have physical access to the line. Any connection using a Telephone line (digital or analogue) is easy to understand for anyone that knows the encoding schema. To realy protect it you should use the same ...


3

If user B is in same network, so he can use ARP poisoning for capturing the data that transfer from user A to the server. This type of attack called MITM ( man in the middle) attack. But if user B is not in the same network, the only way is that installs a backdoor or trojan on the computer of A. Anothe way is that before that user A open web browser, user ...


3

I would recommend using Fiddler for this instead. First you will need to MITM yourself though as Facebook sends this request over HTTPS. You can do this in fiddler by going to Tools -> Fiddler Options -> HTTPS and ticking: Capture HTTPS Connects Decrypt HTTPS Traffic Then you will see a scary warning, as shown below: Clicking Yes will install an ...


3

Can This be done? I would say yes, but with some caveats. Depending on the cable and the data, you would need some very expensive / sensitive equipment to pull this off. To me this is a similar issue to the old Van Eck Phreaking (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Van_Eck_phreaking). Intel has some tech to circumvent this kind of attack: ...


3

I presume that by "router", you mean each of these is a "router/NAT/firewall" combination appliance. Most home routers include firewall capabilities, which is most likely what you're relying upon here. (Note that NAT is a connection sharing technology, but not a defense mechanism.) To directly answer your question, if a hacker gets inside your first ...


3

No. This is the point of SSL, to prevent this kind of unauthorized snooping. To authorize your proxy you need to tell the device to trust the proxy certificate, and tell the device clients to trust your certificate or use the devices private key, which it sounds like you don't have access to. For more information: ...


3

No, the very nature of HTTPS is that the certificate is required to decrypt it. You could sniff the traffic, but it would be encrypted and useless to you.


3

The NSS SSL Keylog file is a non-obtrusive way to extract SSL session keys from an application using the NSS library for SSL/TLS, but there is no standard way to do the same in all applications. (A generic approach would involve a man in the middle attack, but this is not really non-obtrusive.) The idea of the extracting session keys directly from the ...


3

You may not understand https, so I'd like to explain it a little bit. What Happens With HTTPS? Since it uses HTTPS, you generally don't have to worry about packet sniffing if it's properly implemented. With or without HTTPS, the program is not safe from packet sniffing (few things are). Is that a problem? No. Why? Because with properly implemented crypto, ...


3

NMAP has a sniffer-detect script built-into it, it's probably the most simple solution out there. I have seen no comparison of the two tools on their effectiveness. Note that all these solutions do is try and find interfaces running promiscuous mode, there are many ways to sniff a network which would leave no traces at all, for instance taps and spans.


2

These days basic Software Defined Radio (SDR) kit has become very affordable so you can now obtain the RTL-SDR USB stick for about $15 and perform some GSM sniffing on a standard laptop running Wireshark. The GSM capture is done using the RTL-SDR and the airprobe tool (which builds on GnuRadio) that relays the packets to Wireshark, via the GSMTAP port (UDP ...


2

Its very possible that your operator inserts a header in outgoing HTTP traffic containing your mobile number, just to allow remote billing, ad targeting, and remote subscription. http://www.htxt.co.za/2014/10/29/vodacom-admits-to-leaking-phone-numbers-to-websites/ Those sites you visit, are those "trusted" sites or are they "random"? If they are random, it ...


2

The reason you're getting this is because you load certain resources over HTTP. When you look at the page source code, you'll see this: <link rel='stylesheet' id='google-font-body-css' href='http://fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans+Condensed&#038;ver=4.1.1' type='text/css' media='all' /> <link rel='stylesheet' ...


2

If you can login remotely, then there will be very little that you cannot do. Once you have a root shell, you can easily run tcpdump. You can read the local databases that supply encryption keys elsewhere. If within that shell, you are missing commands; you can write, or simply go find the commands you want. If you do manage to get in, there is probably ...


2

These types of question has depends answers. The answer varies depending on the policies of owner of open WiFi and plans among other factors. but This question specially has 2 aspects: (second aspect may be your answer) First one: connecting people to an open WiFi network, without having the owner's permission and following his/her terms of service is ...


2

It depends on how the VPN is set up. One of the possible setups is the following: VPN connection to allow remote access to internal network servers of the company, but all other traffic is direct from you to the internet (so not routed through the VPN). All traffic is routed through the VPN making all traffic between you and the company secure. All other ...


2

You can check network packets against public Tor node list (for example https://torstatus.blutmagie.de/) using WireShark or any other packet sniffing software.


2

Is it must for a packet sniffer to enable promiscuous mode?Can packets be sniffed without the NIC being in promiscuous mode? No it is not a must and sniffing can be done in non-promiscuous too. Also when in promiscuous mode the NIC accepts all packets which are not addressed to it's MAC address.Does it also mean that it responds to all ...


2

There is a possibility that Promiscuous mode can be detected by another device on the network! You can/must configure your sniffer tool/software so that it doesn't allows to detect if you are in promiscuous mode. For that you have to configure your sniffer tool so that your machine doesn't reply to the packets/requests that are usually used to detect the ...


2

SSL/TLS encryption is done end-to-end, meaning only each end can successfully decrypt the session. The point of it being that Wireshark, or other network capture/sniffing tools, cannot eavesdrop on the data contained. In a LAN or corporate environment, SSL interception looks like this: Client workstations tries to go to https://somesite. Inspection ...


2

The difficulties involved in passively intercepting mobile telephone signals can be summed up as follows: Capturing the signals Analyzing the traffic Decrypting the traffic Capturing the signals on the downlink (base station to mobile) is relatively straightforward. You have to be in range of the transmitter and have a suitable receiver. GSM is a popular ...



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