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50

Yes they can but unless your neighbor has the required technical expertise, its highly doubtful. To view incoming and outgoing traffic you need specific software to monitor network packets and the tech knowledge to actually do it. Most routers only keep a syslog and unless they are using software like wireshark to monitor/capture your packets, they cannot ...


38

If you get a VPN and use that for browsing, that will hide all your traffic from both your neighbour and their ISP.


29

What about using tor? Keep in mind that your speed will be affected*. As other people said, using any private mode in your browser is not going to be of any help. *EDIT: The slowdown heavily depends on the network topology, the number of nodes, how much traffic the nodes are handling and what you are downloading. Here you can find some explanations about ...


25

Yes they can actually. What it boils down to is that they can see which websites you are running by looking at: Clear HTTP traffic DNS requests sent One thing you could do is purchase an encrypted VPN and run all your internet traffic through the VPN. This way your neighbours will not be able to see what you are doing.


17

You can't. It doesn't matter whether the wifi is encrypted or not: you can't know whether the access point is trustworthy. A WPA2 access point with a strong password doesn't help when the access point itself is a rogue access point put up by someone who may or may not be the café or hotel owner. And yes, it happens — people put up open access points with ...


11

When my laptop is using a network I don't control (basically anything that's not home) it wears pretty red socks to reroute all traffic into the SOCKS5 proxy built into OpenSSH and then to a server I rent anyways for my website to protect my traffic. You can use tor as well but I intensely dislike tor (for reasons off topic here). This is the socks_up ...


10

In practice, it depends on the router they're using (and, specifically, on the firmware it's running). Basically all home WiFi routers have the technical ability to log visited URLs, as long as their firmware includes such a feature (and it's not exactly a complicated one). The main questions are: whether the router firmware supports such a logging ...


8

Sniffing and snooping should be synonyms. They refer to listening to a conversation. For example, if you login to a website that uses no encryption, your username and password can be sniffed off the network by someone who can capture the network traffic between you and the web site. Spoofing refers to actively introducing network traffic pretending to be ...


6

Maybe you can see that it is indeed possible to send a secret over an untrusted path by the following (somehow simplifying but illustrative :-) example You don't trust the post office and want to send me a gift You can achieve it in the following way You put the gift in a box and lock it with YOUR lock You send the box to me and I additionally lock it ...


4

In short, the key is never directly sent over the wire. It is negotiated in a way that both parties can derive the same key, even though there is not enough data put on the wire to reconstruct it. For instance, in ECDH protocols, each side creates a unique public/private keypair. They then exchange public keys. By computing a mathematical operation on their ...


3

If you can do it (with Wireshark or another tool), then any program that has the same privilege level as you can theoretically do it as well. So if the question is: can the loopback interface be sniffed? I'd reply YES. From what I know, it's more or less the reason why it was created in the first place.


3

Network traffic can be either unicast or broadcast (or multicast, but that's not relevant right now.) NBNS (NetBIOS Name Service) is broadcast, so the switch (your wireless "router" in this case) has a responsibility to deliver it to every host "attached" to it. Most other traffic is unicast, which means the switch should send it directly to the recipient. ...


3

SSL/TLS makes use of public key cryptography. This is the idea that we can have two cryptographic keys, one publicly known (pub), and one only known to the individual and never disclosed (priv). Lets say a user connects to a website with HTTPS (SSL/TLS). They send a request to the server, which responds with among other things, its x509 certificate which ...


3

No, this attack is not feasible. Believe me, I've tried. Now when I say I've tried it, I was not writing a virus or something to steal passwords, I was writing software where the user was fully aware that they were using a custom DNS server which intentionally lied (based on their rules) in conjunction with a HTTP proxy. This is exactly what you describe, ...


3

You can use TCP View which is usually used by investigators and security experts to determine the behavior of certain malware, where it's establishing connections/getting commands from, or more common use is to solve cases where an individual is spying on another by use of Webcam/Microphone etc, by tracing the IP address; an example use of TCPView in such ...


3

Free software to demodulate the signal exists, see http://bellard.org/linmodem.html For the physical signal acquisition on first approximation I'd use a digital oscilloscope, something like https://www.sparkfun.com/products/11219 but it should be possible to do it a lot cheaper unless you plan to reuse it for other projects. If you can cut the line two ...


3

nmap has the ability to guess the operating system by looking at variations in how a device reacts to TCP/IP probes (see the nmap website for details). You can also make a guess at the identity of a device by looking at who its MAC address was allocated to. For example, something with an address in a Hewlett-Packard block is probably a network printer.


2

There really isn't a finite answer here. A Wifi showing a lock is promising some sort of encryption, but this encryption is covering the over the air transmission only. WPA2 is a generally better mechanism than some of the earlier encryption mechanisms (you may see this as part of the description of the network) but the bigger problem is that you really ...


2

Are you looking to monitor packets between your computer as a client on the network and the router and other wireless clients and the router? If you're using windows, it looks like the answer is yes: you'll need to purchase Airpcap. http://ask.wireshark.org/questions/8504/supported-adapters-for-wireless-packet-capturing If you're attempting to monitor at ...


2

@Dimitris answer is a good answer. I think the problem can be more clear with some example: Sniffing: Any eavesdropping on existing traffic can be called sniffing, for example you can sniff your own traffic using a network sniffer, I think the WireShark is a good tool for this purpose. WireShark does not change the packets and only capure them and display ...


2

Right, the corporate network admins implement a man-in-the-middle attack against the TLS client with their own CA so that they can see what's leaving their network. They will probably have a device that will create a certificate on the fly that is valid for gmail.com when you visit gmail.com. The reason they do this isn't to play Dr. Evil, it's so they can ...


2

Depending on the configuration of the network that you're on, it may be possible for administrators to view the contents of HTTPS connections (and possibly VPNs). It is obviously possible to intercept traffic on the network, but the usual problem is that they can't issue valid certificates for all the sites that you visit, so you would see a lot of ...


2

I'd like to suggest Ettercap, a free and open-source network security tool for man-in-the-middle attacks. I recently used its ARP spoofing functionality in an Ethical Hacking / Penetration Testing training, and was amazed how easy it is to set up. It's included in the Kali Linux distribution.


2

As others have said, it is very easy indeed and there are many simple tools available for intercepting data in the clear. It is also very common. The delivery of malware is generally automated and industrial in scale, many 10's of thousands of machines in a typical botnet. Targeted attacks are more limited in scale but are generally not discovered for ...


2

'How common' is not answerable or useful - you need to look at your risk. 'How easy' is much simpler to answer. It is incredibly easy if you are on the same network segment as an endpoint, but it is also easy if you can compromise a router or switch. So, if you have data communications that are a target for an attacker, then they will work out how much ...


2

No, this is not the case. A certificate signed by a CA contains only the public key, but for decrypting you need the private key too. This private key is not needed for the CA to sign the key, so they usually don't have it either. But, some CA offer to simplify the process of certificate generation by generating a key pair for the certificate too. In this ...


1

You can look for strange USB device IDs with USBDview or USBView. USBDeview is a small utility that lists all USB devices that currently connected to your computer, as well as all USB devices that you previously used. For each USB device, extended information is displayed: Device name/description, device type, serial number (for mass storage ...


1

Look into Karma/Karmetasploit and the Dsniff suite of tools... Also something like Firesheep might me useful too in some cases. At a basic level Karma/Karmetasploit is really all you need. Based on what you're asking, go look into what Karma and/or Karmetasploit (which is just Karma merged into/with Metasploit) can do.. Everything you're asking for and ...


1

Easiest way is to just set up a proxy that do whatever is needed. This article is a classic and good starting point: http://www.ex-parrot.com/pete/upside-down-ternet.html


1

Heartbleed does not have anything related to packet sniffing for the exploit to work. It is exploiting an buffer overflow bug which then gain accesses to the server memory. A normal heartbeat request would be like User : request server to reply "Hello" Server: reply "Hello" Now after exploiting the buffer overflow User : request server to reply - part of ...



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