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In your scenario no authentication is done of the server. This means a man in the middle could claim to be the server and send the client any kind of data. If this is a problem depends on the use case: If any downloads are encrypted and also signed the client can verify the origin of the data and if they got modified. The client can still not detect if the ...


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It's hard to say what your definition of "OK" is, but generally, I'd say, no, you're not ok with your current setup. I'll cover your points individually. The data being transferred is strongly encrypted. This is good. In other words, you could put the file with a download link up on a public website. If you trust the encryption, then your data is ...


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SSL termination or SSL proxy products like Bluecoat need to be on your network and considering the cost, the installation procedures involved and the normal security policy any organization would have who installs these products - the threats of a malicious attacker using a commercial SSL termination product is almost zero. OTOH - a trusted insider with ...


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I would connect that lumia via usb and repartition the internal storage. I think a clean install should do the trick, except if he's in the police force.


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What I want to ask is even on a secured wifi (which requires some kind of password for authentication), the data still travels from a device to the router; can't that data be sniffed using tools? Yes, if you sniff in monitor mode, but the data will, as noted, be encrypted. let's say I were an authenticated user of such a secured connection and then ...


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You'll probably find an answer to your question here: Why isn't open WiFi encrypted? In short, if you're using WPA2 or similar authentication on a wireless network, each connection is encrypted uniquely, even if they're using the same password. So yes, theoretically you can sniff the traffic that other WiFi users are generating, however it will all be ...


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You would need to get access to the WiFI first and associate with the access point. You could collect becons and other associated management traffic, but the most you will get is some initialisation vectors, possibly the ssid and some other settings that allow clients to negotiate a connection when they are genenually connecting. In the days of WEP this was ...


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The best way to mitigate this attack is likely to have good knowledge of the systems on your internal network and control access as much as possible. One common way to address this is to make use of things like 802.1x authentication for endpoints, such that connecting a rogue system to the network will not provide an IP address and the connectivity that ...


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Question #3 is much too open ended to answer. For the others, the answer depends on the router model in question and, in function of that, the exact meaning of "admin access". If the router is a Cisco IOS based device and you have privilege level 15 access you can use the regular packet sniffing commands of IOS which would certainly allow you to achieve ...


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Disable third party payment by contacting your operator. You wont be able to pay by phone service - but who needs this? Otherwise if needed, use Adblock.


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Verizon and Sprint recently got in trouble for allowing unauthorized third-party charges. As a result of this, Sprint and Verizon agreed to provide a free service that blocks third party charges. I'd suggest calling up your carrier, and threatening to report them to the FCC if they prove to be unhelpful. You might also be able to receive compensation.



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