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-1

It seems like you are asking about -CSRF (Cross Site Request Forge). This is a vulnerability where server cannot differentiate if the request has been originated by authenticated user himself or a forged request. you can implement a secure token To prevent sniffing packets across the network ,implement HTTPS (TLS 1.2)


1

You can not stop user from intercepting the traffic that your application generates. There're following alternatives that you can do for making your application works correctly :- 1) User Secured Connection(SSL/TLS). Although users on the same network will be able to view the network traffic generated, but they'll not able to figure out any meaning out ...


2

Short Answer: Mostly Likely Not. Your Traffic will be encrypted. However, it is possible to read the data by other means. If the sniffer is some type of malware on either your machine or the receiving end as it could view the data before the payload is encrypted or after its de-capsulated. If the attacker obtained the SSL certificate and is performing ...


0

It is absolutely possible. Not only crashing, but arbitrary code execution is possible. The popular tcpdump tool has had more remote code execution vulnerabilities than we can count. And yes, vulnerabilities that allow for crashing the packet sniffing utility are also quite common. You should never run a packet sniffer on a sensitive system of you suspect an ...


93

If what you describe is true, your chat room is designed badly. The view of the server and what packets it receives should be forwarded to other users should be independent from whatever packets are coming in or going out. Manipulating the traffic on a client should only interfere with that client's view of the chat room, never with other clients. If you ...


49

The short answer: use better chat room software. Your question is lacking details about what kind of chat room program you're using. I am going to assume that it's either a simple client-server model, or a direct peer-to-peer. Either way, you have a sender who types and sends a message, and a receiver (either another client, or a centralized server). From ...


25

Your question is lacking detailed description of what's going on. Therefore, it's impossible to solve the problem you described. However, it might be helpful to point out a different one. If what you described is true, that isn't your problem. Your problem is a much bigger one. Namely that you trust the user. Never trust the user! I assume that you tell ...



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