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2

Try looking under the term "Homoglyph" instead of "homograph". For instance, this might be what you wanted: https://codebox.net/pages/homoglyph-detection It contains code and dictionaries.


4

There are different approaches for homograph attacks. The success depends on the used font. For example in some fonts the small letter l looks very much like the capitalized letter I. And in others they don't. Similarities Use similar characters. They substitute the real character. b ⇔ 6 c ⇔ ( g ⇔ q, 9 C ⇔ ( G ⇔ 6 L ⇔ l, I, ...


2

This seems to me like it very much could be a cramming operation or a premium SMS scam. The US has cracked down on both practices in recent years, but they haven't disappeared completely, and of course, the situation is different in other countries. It would be wise to monitor future bills to make sure that there's no extra charges resulting from this. (...


1

I would assume the 9 digit number is a normal subscriber's number in your country? In that case, the sender probably can't gain anything financially from the messages alone, so this is probably preparation for further scams. The crooks probably batch sent these messages to find out 1) which numbers are valid and 2) which users are naive enough to believe ...



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