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1

I think it would be possible to somewhat significantly reduce the search set, but it largely depends on the resolution of the picture and the worn state of the keyboard. With a visibly worn or dirty keyboard (dirt on the edge of keys could serve the same purpose), you would first establish the possible alphabet, with each key weighted at 1.0. Then establish ...


7

Only if the sole purpose of the keyboard is to type one password. Otherwise, you'll find that more frequently used keys such as vowels, WASD, and modifiers will also have oil stains and signs of wear. It becomes especially more difficult if the password is a passphrase containing natural language.


3

The biggest difference is in scale. A keypad on a lock is generally only used to type the password, so the password keys are the only ones being used and worn. "Any given keyboard" is generally used for much more than only typing passwords. There are many other attacks used on keypads: video cameras watch you enter your pin, heat sensing (flir), or even ...


0

Keyboards wise, I'd consider this a minor concern unless I was using the same password for everything. If you're using a different password for everything and changing them reasonably regularly, you're probably fine. Add this to the fact that if you're using the keypad for other things you're going to get a much different wear pattern than just P A S W O R D ...


2

You need to clarify the term "keyboard". If you take a pic of my keyboard I am writing this text. You will surely notice some patterns and missing letters from my typing. But be aware that most of the time such keyboards are not used to enter passwords at all. Typically you rather get a heat map of the frequently used chars for a certain natural language. ...


49

In some cases yes, you can guess the most frequently used keys by the wear marks. That's how I know that apparently I use the L, M, N, A and E keys a lot - the keys are now just black, the letter is faded. But most people don't use the keyboard for just their passwords, and the wear pattern is also influenced by the stroke direction, angle and pressure - ...


18

There are two different scenarios. This would be a valid question if the keyboard is used only for password typing. A numeric keypad on a door, that's something you shouldn’t post on social media. But you can argue this by saying that there are special characters on your keyboard which may be included in your credentials, because normally we don’t use those ...


1

Until edits come I can only make assumptions, but it sounds like it's your Google account that has been compromised. Check what devices are signed into your google account, change your password, enable Multi Factor Authentication, and clear some caches.



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