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3

It sounds like you're trying to cause/prevent a resettable denial of service condition. If you are ruling out network access to attack the software running on the system, you might consider interfering with the data going through the various devices on the mother board. I'm not an RF engineer or an EE (Electrical Engineer), but it seems though it might be ...


1

Electromagnetic radiation? Many parts of computers (such as Hard Disks) rely on magnets. Provide a sufficient amount of electromagnetic radiation, and the computer is bound to stop working. If the exposure to these waves isn't for too long, there (probably) wouldn't be any permanent damage, the computer would just crash as soon as the hard disk started ...


2

Short answer is: You can't. All your server see is what the computer at the library sends. What programs or processes on that computer that generated the data is impossible for you to know. From the servers perspective, it might as well have been a pidgeon with a telegraph as your legitimate user. The fact that the user entered a password does not mitigate ...


1

There really is no way to be validate the input if the user's computer is compromised. There are just too many variables. When your browser submits a form it looks something like this before it's encrypted and sent to the server: POST /login.php HTTP/1.1 Host: www.example.com User-Agent: mycoolbrowser Content-Length: 34 Content-Type: ...


0

As your aim is to "prevent" such an attack, I would focus on physically bolting the case inside a suitable tamper-resistant enclosure and then to the (ideally concrete) wall/floor, with tamperproof fixing. With the power cable inside the housing and not exposed, ventilation made inaccessible, and ideally steel in the enclosure against electromagnetic ...


7

Several motherboards have overheating protection, if the computer or especially the CPU / graphics card gets too hot, the computer will switch off. So ... turn up the heat in the room (with a big heat-source) until the computer starts rebooting indefinetly. It will be hard not to damage other components I think. In order not to target other nearby ...


2

For wireless attacks, you're limited by having to induce currents in the machine, and it's nigh impossible to do that predictably, without going overboard (i.e. EMP style) and causing permanent damage. You could try doing something the (maybe) installed wireless card, but you'd have to know something of the software, and you'd basically be attacking using ...


1

Owasp is one of the most respected authorities on information security. Here is their list of testing tools. https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Appendix_A:_Testing_Tools In regard to minimising the risk: Organisations should ensure their solution architecture takes into account the importance of information security. organisations should commission regular ...


2

There are many tools, and a few standards, but no standardized tools and a lot of the tools are expensive. To minimize risk you basically have to teach your team how to code and deploy securely, conduct security tests frequently, and frequently update your security infrastructure at a very fast cyclical pace. This can get expensive to do (time or ...


4

I don't know the specifics of the routine you were asked to amend, but I can tell you the following. When you allocate memory on the heap, even if you correctly de-allocate it, there is no guarantee that the contents of that memory is erased after you're done with it. On the stack it's the same deal - however because of the way the stack works - that ...



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