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Yes, there certainly are circumstances that require programmers to hold security clearances. The most common is when working for directly for the federal government at any of a number of agencies including the Department of Defense, Department of State, FBI, NSA, and a number of others. In the private sector, you'll most commonly see clearance ...


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Some software vendors partner with BIOS makers (e.g. Absolute) so that even if an operating system is re-installed, on network connection, the BIOS may be able to send back relevant information. Many of these products are gimmicky, for example LoJack can be blocked at a firewall/network level that will disallow it from phoning home. These types of software ...


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Generally on a computer, software encryption often runs on shared architecture such as your computers CPU. True hardware encryption would run on something like a Secure Cryptoprocessor or similar dedicated chipset. This can help isolate secure procedures from the rest of the system and often have architecture to very quickly run the needed calculations. ...


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Ultimately, there is no difference: both "type" of encryption will end up running some software on top of some hardware so this is mostly a marketing argument. How an encryption stack works exactly depends, of course, from case to case and it is very important to review the details. For instance, some hard drive will implement some encryption layer in the ...


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Hardware based encryption has several advantages: Speed - hardware encryption works much more faster than software one. Independence - it's independent from host system - OS, drivers, etc. Separate processor for number generation is also big plus. Security - More secure against malware, brute force attacks, cold boot attack, etc.



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