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There are various types of emails that come to your inbox/spam-emails folder. The one attached here with is an example of Phishing Email under the broad category spam. Spam emails are generally, but not always, marketing emails (ex. cheap viagra) sent to you without consent. It is email that you don’t want and didn’t ask for, and its content can cause ...


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This data is fake data usually. They are using UK to make it look more legitimate depending on the target address most of the times. You can spoof anything in the email except for the sending IP address and DKIM/SPF records which the companies you have in your list are not using.


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One goal of modern spammers is to identify individuals who will likely be easy victims. Responding to such a random, unexpected message may indicate a certain naivety which can be lucrative when nefariously exploited. The random letters may be an attempt to throw off spam filters. In regards to the email being added to an existing conversation, did that ...


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If Gmail combined them together, then they must be linked one way or another. This actually gives you the best explanation you can get that the spam is linked to that newsletter's mailing list.


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You didn't really get the meaning of the EXISTS, I believe. What you describe (allow example.com to send mail from example.org) would be INCLUDE! INCLUDE:example.com means see the spf record for example.com and apply the rules. EXISTS is much simpler. It means "If the given DN resolves to any address, it will match (no matter the address it resolves to)." ...


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SPF uses qualifiers (Pass, HardFail, SoftFail, Neutral) in order to determine the validity level of a request. The qualifiers are determined by checking any or even all the following configured mechanisms: ALL: Matches anything not already defined by another mechanism will match the all mechanism A: If the domain name has an address record (A or AAAA) ...


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It's a classic for a reason: Your post advocates a (X) technical ( ) legislative ( ) market-based ( ) vigilante approach to fighting spam. Your idea will not work. Here is why it won't work. (One or more of the following may apply to your particular idea, and it may have other flaws which used to vary from state to state before a bad federal law was ...


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Besides the standard ways (checking headers, broken clients, spam filters, etc) of detecting spammers, and depending on how strict your settings are, you can try to limit your emails only to fully qualified domains and ignore any "Unknown" sources (that is what I do). I personally believe that all emails should be sent from mail servers and not directly ...


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Being a mail system administrator, I suppose you know that email messages do not contain anything that would allow you to identify whether they are sent by a human or a machine. The BOT will certainly not indicates that it's a BOT in the message or even the headers. Common SPAM detection methods apply to any messages whether sent by a BOT or not. I ...


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There are many ways that advertisers can track you across different sites. As mentioned here, Skype displays Google ads. In Google's Terms of Service, they state: Our automated systems analyze your content (including emails) to provide you personally relevant product features, such as customized search results, tailored advertising, and spam and ...


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As well as malware, as already indicated in Kevin Morssink's answer, the risks include being compromised by any of the cross-domain exploits should any vulnerabilities exist on sites you trust and are possibly logged into: e.g. Cross-site scripting. Cross-site request forgery. Session fixation i.e. Client-site attacks on the sites you use. See the ...



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