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2

In the USA, there is the CAN SPAM act which requires advertisers to honor and respect unsubscribe requests. Violating this is a very serious crime. You can report it easily to the FTC, and if it's a US company, they will get into a lot of trouble. Because of how bad the punishment is, legitimate companies rarely disregard unsubscribe requests - you can ...


0

Seems like a classic case of referral spam. The idea is not not spam your users. But to spam you or trick you into visiting the site within the referral. They have likely never visited your site or even know of it. In the case of Google Analytics when you visit a site the GA script sends specific info back. It is very easy to find out what needs to be sent ...


1

My experience with such links is that the amount of spam that I receive tends to decrease when I click on such links. Although most such links go to a similar/identical page as each other, I am of the opinion that those links are provided in order to legally cover the spammers - because anyone sending email has a legal obligation to stop sending at the ...


3

If you know the sender has got your email address legitimately, as per @WernerCD's answer ('Something you signed up for - knowingly, accidentally, "opt-in" purposely, "opt-out" not clicked'), go to their website and unsubscribe there. Many companies use third party web sites as end points for the unsubscribe links ("mailbot.com/unsubscribe" as opposed to ...


5

It's pretty much a coin toss. If the spammer is a honest one, you'll get unsubscribed. If he's a malicious one, you'll get marked as "active reader" and get enrolled in even more spam lists. The second option silently assumes that it's actually worth the spammer's time to keep track of "good" and "bad" recipients, that is, that having a tracking system is ...


122

I think the one thing the others (as of this post) hasn't mentioned: Source of the spam I would say you should differentiate between "Good" spam (Something you signed up for - knowingly, accidentally, "opt-in" purposely, "opt-out" not clicked)... And "Bad"/"Unknown" spam (random garbage that likely uses the click for tracking). I have no issue clicking ...


3

I use hotmail (live/outlook...) and in their web client, at the bottom of each email they have an unsubscribe button, it is not part of the email it's within the mail client and this button will unsubscribe you from sources which they trust and have set up this system with. If the source is not trusted they will simply block them from sending you further ...


5

In addition to being marked as an active reader as @Danny says, unsubscribe links could be used to infect your system with malware. If you actually subscribed to the site and want to unsubscribe the best way to do it is log into the site and change your preferences. Otherwise report it as spam and delete it.


38

You should not click on any links. By clicking on the "unsubscribe" link you propably get marked as "Active Reader" which is willing to interact. You also get on the page of the sender, which might could infect you with malware. Remember: With clicking on any link you've confirmed to the sender that your email address is both valid and in active use. Just ...


-1

Try tracing and blocking his public IP address. That will most likely stop spam.


0

yes its obvious the customers have to upgrade the script and its going whack a mole bassis , we keep flagging the user while we disable the script but somehow some dumb user restores old backup or something and this malicious activity repeats. we again go through process of finding the spam then searching the script then blocking the script again messaging ...


1

This most likely means you or your users are using outdated software / applications. The only way to prevent this, is to regularly update and patch this software / applications unless the hacker is using a 0-day exploit that's currently unknown. Try determining the entry point where this script is uploaded from the web server log files. Once found, inform ...


0

Per recent announcements from Google regarding their parsing and execution of Javascript and CSS ( http://googlewebmastercentral.blogspot.com/2014/05/understanding-web-pages-better.html ) and confirmed by 3rd parties (http://searchengineland.com/tested-googlebot-crawls-javascript-heres-learned-220157) , the likelihood of fooling spam bots using these old ...



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