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2

I do not see any evidence from the e-mail you posted that a viable scam could be operated from the message. However, if you post full details maybe this will change. But based on the screenshot, and the information provided I can't conclude there's malicious intent. A check of the SPF records for email-2.microsoft.com shows: v=spf1 include:customers....


1

The question you have to ask yourself is, why would ClickDimensions be sending an email and would attempt to make it look like it came from Microsoft? This is what GMail is alerting you to; the source address doesn't 100% match up. Also, the notice is absolutely worth paying attention to, emphasis mine: It has a from address in email-2.microsoft.com ...


3

This is probably correct in a statistical sense. A legitimate e-mail will probably (but not certainly) go through several hops not only on the destination side (which are mostly always the same for a given recipient, so that number is not interesting) but also on the sending side, and these will be recorded in Received headers. A spam, however, while sent ...


4

What risks do you have? Possibly that your computer is now infected with malicious software like a virus or a trojan horse. The following steps should be taken if you didn't already. What to do? There are some steps you can take: First of all, don't click on links that you don't trust or know Use unshortenit.it or urlex.org to check where the ...


1

Just having your GA ID isn't enough to compromise the site. There is the chance that the spambot is sending fake referrer information using your domain name, but that doesn't have anything to do with GA tracking code, and furthermore, it's out of your control even if they do. If this email didn't come from Google, like @Matthew said, I'd classify it as ...


1

Anyone can create new email accounts with "John1234", and those usernames are considered "public" so you have no control over that. What is more interesting is how the spammer got a hold of the distribution lists. I would highlight the "change password" advice and make sure that proper hygiene is being practiced.


3

They are abusing the script https://linkedin.com/slink which is an "open redirect". When someone posts a link on Linkedin, the website automatically converts it to an URL which uses the slink-script with an unique code for that URL. When a user clicks on that link, the script forwards the user to the actual URL. The purpose of that layer of indirection is ...


0

You are looking at it in the wrong way. One of the following scenarios is probably happened: The attacker gained your contact list and used their email to spam your contact list - In this case I suggest you look over apps/programs that are installed on the device you use for checking your email. Attacker has hacked your email account and stole your ...


2

The most reasonable explanation is that your email address recently ended up in a email list used by spammers. How could this happen? There are at least three possibilities: you recently subscribed to a website, who secretly "shared" email addresses with shady organizations; you subscribed (perhaps a long time ago) to a website which was recently ...



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