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4

I think here is not the place to ask this kind of question. Anyway, I don't think it is possible to hack a phone with a couple calls (yet). Should you notice any suspicious activity in your phone bill you can ask for help in your telephone company. In case your phone behaviour is odd, you can factory reset the device, which should erase anything that might ...


0

Tripwire is one of the software perfectly answering to your need. By the way, it is also usefull to detect misbehaving OS or software installers (the one which unwillingly let admin file with write access all over the FS). The evil may also come from inside :[.


1

My suggestion, if permitted in the country you are traveling to (there may be some export control issues, depending on the destination), full disk encryption (FDE) would be the way to go. Without the master password, no alterations can be made to the encrypted portion of the disk. This will not protect you from physical tampering of your device, as you ...


5

Reduce your exposure within System Preferences > Sharing close everything you don't need. To give you a practical example, in my case, everything is off. Shut off netbios: cd /System/Library/LaunchDaemons /usr/bin/sudo launchctl unload -w com.apple.netbiosd.plist ps ax | grep 'PID|netbiosd' This might highly reduce network noise. Scan for residual ...


3

We cannot comment on the possibility of a latent infection of your computer. We do not have enough information, and this is not an infection-removal forum. But, we can talk about your bigger questions. To know if you have privacy is tricky. You can't prove a negative (no one has seen my communication, or everyone has seen none of my communication), but you ...


2

Long answer: Nothing you've described "post OS reinstall" sounds abnormal - with the borderless nature of the internet, it's not surprising that lots of your legitimate traffic seems to be going to servers in other countries (or without DNS entries). While applications which utilize UPnP to function may put you at higher risk for intrusion or exploitation ...


3

The domain is 1e100.net but the whois entry you show is for le100.net, with an l, not a 1 (if these appear to be the same for you, then choose a better font). The 1e100.net domain is a lot more legitimate, and its name is some sort of joke. Indeed, if you do a whois request on it, you get: Domain Name: 1e100.net Registry Domain ID: (...) Registrant ...


2

May be able to clarify if you provide an operating system. If you are seeing suspicious traffic originating from your machine to some suspicious hostnames, you should try to see what files/programs are running on your machine producing the traffic. It is possible that they are not malicious, but if they are, there has to be some application ...


2

To avoid a whois service from using your input for domain squatting, you should always use the whois service of the official operating entity of that top level domain. For .com, this is VeriSign.


-2

I don't see anyone bringing up this explanation yet so I will. You may or may not already know that the Mac OSX kernel started as a fork of the BSD kernel. Over the years, the Mac OSX kernel has evolved into a hybrid kernel. The BSD and GNU kernels are considered Monolithic. The difference between a monolithic kernel and hybrid kernel is basically that the ...


2

For all the tl;dr people, No. What you should do though is this: Install nifty browser plugins like AdBlock, FlashBlock, and Disconnect.me Set restrictive Flash and Java permissions Firewall: on prevent execution of non-identified Applications (and whitelist apps at your discretion) stop telling your friends Windows is bad because it gets viruses and ...


1

Here was my situation about 3 months ago. Processor running at 95C, fans on full. Puzzled I start trying to dig into whats doing it. Google Chrome had web workers (6) running at 100%. I had installed a series of colored themes for the browser so I could run profiles for contracts I had. Personal, Work, and Work2. One of the themes I had installed was ...


26

This is a little long but this exact argument has been rehashed for the last 14 years. I want to put it to bed. I worked for Apple Tech support from 1992-2001 and have been an Apple developer since. So, I have a very good historical view of Apple ecosystem malware security. My conclusion? 3rd party anti-malware software on the Mac is unnecessary and as ...


23

Despite the common wisdom, I would not recommend running anti-virus for two reasons: Anti-virus does not really work. Though it might catch trivial or well-known viruses, it mostly just gives you a false sense of security. Anti-virus can cause problems. In order to function, anti-virus programs have to situate themselves quite low on the computer ...


39

There is no clear evidence that third party anti-malware security software (AV software) is more effective than Apple's own security solutions to protect Macs. Rich Mogull on the Mac TidBITS blog explains: Far less malware exists for Macs, but even there we see limited effectiveness across tools. For example, in a recent test by Thomas Reed, even the ...


20

Macs do get viruses, the main reason why there were historically so few viruses around for Mac is because their market share was so small. When someone writes a virus, most of the time they want to infect as many targets as possible. So 10 years ago this would result in almost only Windows viruses since they had such large market share. Recently, however, ...


14

I'll answer in the form of an anecdote. Back in 2003, I was working in tech support for a Mac-based organisation. We were essentially a government contractor and, as such, nearly all our money came from sending Microsoft Word documents to the government to document what we had done and what we should be paid for. Someone managed to bring a Word macro virus ...


0

There are many software used to track all activities on your phone. I used spybubble that lets you find out the information you need through one or more of its advanced features. Each of the features offers you a way to monitor a Symbian phone, and thus, to find out information about the person using it.


2

Because your question is broad, I will answer it broadly. As with any system, there is never* complete security. For the sake of completeness, I will call the NSA 'hackers' (albeit a form of ethical hacking). There are so many threat vectors that a hacker can exploit on a modern smartphone. Iphones in general are usually better protected than their ...


1

Paralleling Bruno's comment ... you have no way of knowing that the phone is actually off, unless you physically take out the battery or attach an oscilloscope to measure draw. If it is infected with an appropriate malware, the phone could fool you into thinking it is off by turning off the screen and ignoring input (except the power button), while still ...


3

You make some wrong assumptions : "how can it be remotely turned on if no software is running and network communications aren't even activated until the device boots". There are two computers in your average smartphone, the one that you more or less control, running e.g iOS or Android, and a second one, the Baseband Processor, handling radio communication ...



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