Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

You've evolved to mostly right, but to add several points and expand on @CoverosGene more than I felt comfortable doing in an edit: X.509 defines a certificate (and some other things not relevant here) in ASN.1, a (very!) general data structuring method which has several defined encodings, of which DER Distinguished Encoding Representation is quite common ...


4

What you want is not possible, because there is no established trust relation between client and server and plain HTTP can not provide a secure way to establish this trust. Only HTTPS provides thus trust by checking the servers certificate against local trust anchors at the client, that is it infers the new trust from trust settings already built into the ...


4

You can have SSL/TLS without certificates. This is supported in the TLS standard: the "DH_anon" cipher suites involve no certificate whatsoever. But you have to remember that such an unauthenticated TLS is inherently weak against active attackers, since they cannot prevent client or server impersonation (or both at the same time, which is called a ...


4

SSL/TLS (the underlying protocol for HTTPS) provides two features: Encryption, so that nobody could passively listen to the data. Encryption is done using a key which is somehow shared between the peers. Identification, so that you can be sure who you are talking to. This is usually done with certificates. While you might have encryption without ...


4

Guess My educated guess from reading the spec: The browser will never see more than one server-certificate. Rather the cipher spec is negotiated in advance. And ONLY THEN does the server send the certificates. So if negotiation winds up with an an RSA-cert authenticated cipher suite, then the RSA cert chain will be sent. And if the negotiation winds up with ...


3

It seems their OCSP-cert has expired on September 10th. Certificate: Data: Version: 3 (0x2) Serial Number: 132 (0x84) Signature Algorithm: sha256WithRSAEncryption Issuer: C=NL, O=Digidentity B.V., CN=Digidentity Services CA - G2 Validity Not Before: Sep 20 10:40:55 2012 GMT Not After : Sep 10 ...


2

For public IP it must be checked that the IP is actually owned by the one who requests the certificate. Issuing certificates for private (reserved) IP is deprecated because obviously the ownership cannot be checked. For more information see CA baseline requirements Sect 9.2.1.


2

Not only will they not issue new certificates for unvalidatable IPs, but also revoke them in 2016. https://www.digicert.com/internal-names.htm As from 1 October 2016, CAs shall revoke all unexpired Certificates. More info in Mozilla's Wiki: CA:Problematic_Practices#Certificates_referencing_hostnames_or_private_IP_addresses


2

HTTPS is not designed to keep people from sniffing your browsing habits, and doesn't really protect you from this. Anyone able to sniff network traffic (your ISP, for example) can see https DNS and domain requests just as easily as http-- this allows visibility into what servers/IPs you have requested. HTTPS only protects the CONTENT of the pages viewed, as ...


2

First, create the directories to hold the CA certificate and related files: sudo mkdir /etc/ssl/CA sudo mkdir /etc/ssl/newcerts The CA needs a few additional files to operate, one to keep track of the last serial number used by the CA, each certificate must have a unique serial number, and another file to record which certificates have been issued: sudo ...


2

Yes, if the site is public and its content is known to the attacker, the attacker with access to the encrypted traffic can find out which page on the blog the user visited just by measuring the size. The website could remedy this by padding all lengths of all pages to the maximum, and always including the same number of images, each with padded sizes. The ...


2

Wireshark should be able to do it. However, the process is not as straightforward as you would have to scan the memory for the master secret. Here is a tutorial on how to decrypt SSL without access to the master private key. http://www.cloudshield.com/blog/advanced-malware/how-to-decrypt-openssl-sessions-using-wireshark-and-ssl-session-identifiers/


2

I had a very similar problem with Postfix and Dovecot on Ubuntu. I had purchased the basic SSL certificate from Comodo and because I selected "other" as the server type I ended up with a zip file with four certificate files in it, as per the above posts. I wasn't getting security exceptions in the client. In my case I couldn't even get past the account ...


1

Since money is the issue for you, I'll post this link: https://letsencrypt.org/2014/11/18/announcing-lets-encrypt.html The EFF, Mozilla, and other organizations have teamed up to create a free CA. It's designed for people in your exact situation. The downside is that it will not be available until Q2 2015.


1

If you want to do that install Firefox. Firefox comes with its own trusted CA store and what you add there will only be available to Firefox.


1

The whole goal of HTTPS is to prevent eavesdropping so that anyone monitoring your web traffic can't see what you're sending. As useful as it is, HTTPS presents a bit of a problem to antivirus software because when you visit sites over an encrypted connection, your antivirus software cannot see what sites you're visiting or what files you're downloading, at ...


1

Everybody uses RSA. If you stick to RSA, you certificate should be acceptable everywhere. Use a 2048-bit key size. ECDSA is nifty and very hipster, but won't work everywhere yet. A RSA key is a RSA key. However, a certificate is also a signed object, and a signature algorithm begins with some hashing. Thus, a certificate will contain references to a hash ...


1

If their server is exclusively on SSLv3, then probably not yet, but very, very soon. Apple has disabled features of SSLv3 already. Mozilla plans to disable SSLv3 on Nov 25. Google plans to disable it by the end of the year. Microsoft may have already disabled it in Internet Explorer. To test it, try disabling SSLv3 in your browser and connect to the ...


1

In spite of being possible to read/write data to SSL/TLS channels as with vanilla TCP/IP sockets, in Java or C or whatever, SSL provides you the concept of SSL session, which can be kept across several TCP/IP connections. Thus, IMHO this makes SSL a session layer protocol (I wonder why someone came up with the TLS name...).


1

Your browsing habits can be tracked even when using https because the destination is visible even though the messages are encrypted. Even when using a VPN to escape your local networks, data volume and frequency can give an accurate representation of what types of data are being exchanged.


1

PKCS #7 can be thought of as a format that allows multiple certificates to be bundled together, either DER- or PEM- encoded, and may include certificates and certificate revocation lists (CRLs). Per RFC2315, PKCS#7 is a general syntax for data that may have cryptography applied to it, such as digital signatures and digital envelopes. The syntax admits ...


1

Because verification is up to clients. And some of these didn't do a good job. So to support these you had to fiddle with the certificates. MichaelHolm.Info: IP addresses in SubjectAltName in SSL website certificates #fail for some browsers


1

Why do CSR utilities give you the option to list an IP as an IP if this does not work? I don't know which CSR utilities you refer too, but some of them target people who know what they do. Certificates are not restricted to browsers and the rules how they get used differ in other contexts. Especially the often used openssl is a tool which is able to ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible