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Some laptops are equipped with Intel Anti-Theft technology (part of vPro, see a guide here). The features are built directly into the processor and the BIOS and can take separated control of the on-board NIC, Wifi card and 3G modem independent of the OS. Technically, once setup (inside the OS), the features don't even need a disk to run. The concept is ...


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Yes, there are several requirements for an iterative hash function: It should not be possible to do any precomputation, such as using rainbow tables. The implementation should avoid running into cycles or fixed points in the hash function. The implementation should be as fast as possible, because that is what the attacker would use. Especially on the ...


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The instances I know of that use quick-erase are built into special purpose, tamper-detecting hardware. If someone attempts to open the case, cut a hole in the case, disassemble the case, or even drill a hole through the printed circuit board, the detectors trigger. This sends a signal to a small special purpose CPU. Its only job is to wait for a tamper ...


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A smartcard with encrypted storage might be able to satisfy your requirement. While not being used, the smartcard will have the key encrypted in its persistent storage, it is inaccessible in its encrypted form. You enter the decryption key once when you plug the smartcard into a computer. When you unplug the card, the smartcard loses power and this wipes ...


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You could setup with your usb/SD card or any memory device make sure your machine would recognize device. In windows, use Bitlocker and it also share key with removable device and printer too. You could do this, and setup your own security make sure it would not erase for that you could disable write pin from device In pendrive 4 pins: 1 pin 5v power ...


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Try to make your own key from ATMega/STM32 ARM chip: you make it as an USB slave (peripherial) device it has an EEPROM with the key, so you have a jumper you're removing after storing the key it has a battery inside an "emergency wipe button* starts an EEPROM filling with random data circuitry (optional) after some wiping cycles it uses an overvoltage ...


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There is no such system where you can exclude the human element. Software and hardware developers are humans so these systems you describe can and probably will have bugs. Also these systems are designed by humans and in the best case they include a risk analysis which is state of the art, but does not account for attacks nobody could think or attacks which ...



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