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4

Due to the microscopic nature of current HDD internals this may no longer be possible... I once witnessed an 8" 12MB HDD having most of its data recovered after being "security wiped" with several passes of 0's, then 1's bit patterns. This may have been pre-RLL or RLE. I do not remember if the method employed had a name, which makes it difficult for me to ...


20

The reason you write '0' instead of '1' has to do with the way magnetic storage encodes the 0 and the 1. a long explanation of it can be found on Wikipedia under Run-length_limited. In short RLL is the methodology used to store the '1' and '0' and it is more complex than just to store the bit values themselves. On a side note to make the drive more like it ...


0

Drives, especially flash based ones like SSDs, thumb drives and flash cards don't write single bits, they write whole blocks of a larger number of bytes. You'd have to rewrite all blocks not containing only zeros anyway, or might ending up rewriting a block multiple times, once for each "one" in there. Worse, because of wear leveling techniques you can't ...


1

As long as the data travels inside a properly configured SSL/TLS connections, there is no security issue regarding the increase amount of data sent through the internet, the only downside would be an increased load on your server. If you cannot trust local storage, then fetching the data from the server when it is required seems the best option from a ...


0

The other posts made the succinct point of saying the processors should shut you out quickly if you spam them with auth attempts, so it's doubtful you would make much headway there. If a hash were supplied as well, this would be stupidly easy to crack If by hash you mean the output of a hashed PAN, then it depends on the algorithm employed. Consider ...


1

Best guess, short version: It's rooted in physical practices and has been retained into digital practice It's not significantly different from brute force guessing without it Reasoning: Historically, truncated numbers are printed on receipts because they provide enough information to allow identification for chargebacks in a return or refund. For ...


3

I think it makes more sense in the context of how much extra information is being given away, rather than how easy it'd be to brute force the remaining digits. A PAN is not entirely a random value, it's made up of: a six-digit Issuer Identification Number (IIN) (previously called the "Bank Identification Number" (BIN)) the first digit of which is ...


1

Chip and pin (EMV) credit cards support online PIN verification, which means the PIN has to be stored somewhere (I don't know whether it's at a central location controlled by VISA/MasterCard or at the bank), I assume its hash is stored securely as VISA/MC are usually pretty up to date in terms of security, though it's still very easy to bruteforce a 4-digit ...


0

Just like store password. Your PIN will be one-way-hashed, salted, and then stored in HSM in an encrypted format. Internal staff would be restricted (using access control policy) to get your PIN info. Even there is a way to get your PIN, it is hashed and hard to get your original PIN number. By this means, your bank would be able to associate your hashed ...


0

New visa debit card will the pin be the same? also read this answer it is same as you: A second bank card arrived with the same PIN They are probably stored encrypted, for local employees etc, but for an engineer working there it won't be a big problem to get the PIN out of the database. The only place where PIN records are stored is HSM.


0

You would do it the same way you'd do it on a computer, but once the machine is compromised, all bets are off, and you're mostly wasting your time. You may check out this related question on which my answer suggests deriving a key from the hardware and using it to encrypt the sensitive data but even then, that only buys you more time until the attacker ...


-2

I have read a post which clearly stated that Whatsapp messages can be easily retained. Whatsapp is not a secured messaging App. Follow these steps to secure your ‪WhatsApp‬ from getting hacked: WhatsApp doesn’t have a very secure server, so avoid using WhatsApp when on Wi-Fi. Never share your IMEI number Avoid keeping your phone out at places where it can ...



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