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4

If you're talking about modern hard disks (spinning platters, magnetic data), then it doesn't matter what is written as long as something is written. The NIST Special Publication 800-88 Rev 1 contains the relevant guidelines. It's updated and talks about different types of media. Now they do say that the overwrite should be verified (because maybe something ...


5

No, that doesn't guarantee overwriting. If sparse files are enabled for your filesystem, long strings of zeroes might not actually be written out. Also, the area used by the filesystem to keep track of files (inode table or other nomenclature depending on the filesystem) probably wont' be filled and behavior varies greatly based on the filesystem you're ...


0

First of all, please take @Joseph Kern's answer seriously! Think how hard it is to play an audio tape or access the data on a floppy disk nowadays—both storage formats were prevalent and widespread in the 1990's, only two decades ago. You mentioned USB sticks: the standard USB-plug will be gone within a decade, replaced by the new USB-C plug and that will ...


3

Backups and Archives Oh My! Based on my unscientific Googling First issues first, let's turn this into a scientific exercise (library science!), the decisions you make today will affect people that you haven't (or might never) meet. You've mentioned two of your three options for key management; analogue and digital. Have you considered your third ...


3

I'm also interested in the practicalities of paper backup, in particular tools that allow adding error-detection and error-correction capabilities similar to what RAR does for archives (i.e. dial-your-desired-security), and perhaps encodings that are more efficient and/or robust in the face of OCR than, say, base64. Have you considered combining paper ...


3

@curious_cat has a great answer. I'm going to add a few other areas, though. First, what's your budget for this? You need the budget in three areas: Capital and operational expenditure for inital start-up buying HD-Rosetta capable addressable microscopes, equipment to etch stone or clay tablets, OCR scanners that can handle stone or clay tablets, etc. ...


14

What about something like Verbatim's Archival Grade Gold DVD-R>? It gives 4 GB storage. They claim a life of "up to 100 years" but I find no independent verification. Frankly I'm skeptical. But maybe you can boost your chances by just burning the same data on to multiple disks and hope any failures are uncorrelated? I'd buy disks from different lots or ...


0

You can show the full credit card data as long as user passes the MFA(Multi factor authentication). Also phone number which is used to validate the MFA, should be attached to that user. No links should be available to redisplay the card data again. Also page should never be cashed.


0

Credit card data is not homogeneous. There is some information you can show and others you aren't even allow to store. For instance, you aren't allowed to store the CVV2 code. Yet other credit card data is the cardholder name, the transaction history, etc. So you have to look at it on a field-by-field basis. Generally speaking, best practice is minimization ...


5

Zero-Knowledge is an expression with a very precise meaning in cryptography, which does not match yours. Not using that expression would be a good communication move, even though you would not be the first person to abuse the terminology. The property that you want to talk about would be better called "mistrust". The point of it is to indeed increase ...



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