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Well, you need to transfer files. So those files could be malware. Of course, in order to infect yourself, you could need to do something silly such as running the program you copied from that analog medium. Or the “program to receive analog data” could have a vulnerability (eg. buffer overflow) that can be silently exploited. If you think about it, an ...


0

Think of the process as a secure channel of communication. The intent is to cut out the "middle man" of USB sticks and networks, which could be used by an attacker. But if malware was on the source computer, then the malware would traverse that channel to the destination. The scope of this solution is the channel only. And it would provide great protection, ...


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This client behavior is prohibited by section 8.1 of the RFC: If an HTTP response is received over insecure transport, the UA MUST ignore any present STS header field(s). The spec prohibits severs from sending insecure HSTS directives and clients from processing insecure HSTS directives. This ensures that a faulty implementation in either a server or ...


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This may be to avoid the use of this header to cause a denial of service attack. Imagine an insecure HTTP-only website. Now imagine someone able to tamper with the HTTP headers sent by this site to add an HSTS header. According to the RFC: The UA should stop trying to access the site through HTTP, and try to use HTTPS only instead. If the UA is unable to ...


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The risk/issue is exactly the same and the mitigation as well. Regardless if it loads the database partially or completely into memory. There will be no way for you to tell which keys have been compromised and which haven't. So the only option would be to revoke them all, regardless if it's a Redis or SQL database. Most of the time the reason why people are ...


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There are a few ways that you can detect if you are a victim of a MITM attack, where the attacker has the ability divert traffic and/or to create bogus certificates from a trusted CA. In the case where you are connecting to a host that you've previously connected to, certificate pinning can be used. With certificate pinning, your client stores the ...


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Not really, no. First, some terms. You mention ARP spoofing; this is not something you can detect at the IP level. ARP is what tells you which MAC address to address your frames to in order to send them to a given IP; ARP spoofing means you think you're sending them to the right IP, but your device addresses them to the attacker at the MAC layer. This can, ...



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