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2

Barcodes can be to exploited because of fact that most barcodes contain not only numeric and alphanumeric characters, but also full ASCII characters (special ones included) depending on the protocol being used. Barcode scanners are essentially keyboard emulators and if they support protocols such as Code128 (which supports ASCII control characters), an ...


8

After going through the code, I'm not sure that it is supposed to exploit or attack anything. It looks like its only purpose is to encode a payload using barcodes. It would be a nice way to import code into a system using a barcode reader when all other routes may be blocked. After you locate a vulnerability in a system, you can "upload" a payload using one ...


7

This is remarkably similar to attacks like SQLi, and the remediation is the same. Wherever you allow a barcode to be scanned as input, validate it in the scanner and only allow input that matches the requirements. If you expect a field of 20 digits, only allow 20 digits and strip off anything after 20. If you expect 8 alphanumerics, limit it to that. ...


3

You may be looking for 'breach'. As described below, the original threat remains, a breach has occurred, and additional new unmitigated threats may exist where the attacker may be able to do additional damage now that they're inside. Threat: the possibility that something could try to happen Threat Actor: the person or other entity who will try to make ...


-1

A threat has nothing to with a malware. It is basically a certain probability that an vulnerability gets exposed. A malware is an exploited vulnerability by some kind.


4

Yes. Why do I say this? It is important to understand what all these vulnerability's are and why they exists (I will be calling the victim "subscriber"): Why do they exists: SS7 was designed and developed in 1975 as a protocol for telecommunication for call operating centers. Since we are talking here about 1975, the security of the protocol was not ...


3

The answer is yes. As explained in this link a similar exploit has been made on Facebook. If you have a phone number linked to your Facebook account, a hacker just needs your phone number and just by hitting the "reset my password" button and intercepting the confirmation code sent to your phone he will have full access.



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