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6

HSTS only forces a site to use HTTPS. This prevents downgrade attacks such as SSLstrip from being effective. As HSTS says nothing about the certificate that will be used, it has no effect when you renew your certificate. (Note that the certificate will still need to pass all standard validity checks.) HTTP public key pinning, a related technology, is used ...


4

Changes to DNS aliases (CNAME) or IP addresses do not matter at all to certificate validation. All what matters is that the hostname as seen by the client (for example the name in the URL) matches the subject(s) of the certificate. This name will not change on any changes to the DNS. Often a DNS CNAME gets confused with a HTTP redirect. In the case of CNAME ...


4

Given how old these ciphers are I could imagine that the client also supports SSLv2 which is broken. Also it will probably accept certificates signed with MD5 or even MD4 or MD2 which are broken too so one should be able to create a faked certificate accepted by the client. That is if the client checks certificates at all because even a few years ago it was ...


4

TL;TR: there is maybe (or maybe not) some substance to the patent but I consider the claims made in the press widely exaggerated. I don't see any substance for the claims of helping against MITM. And it addresses different use cases than TLS, so no need to compare. While there was lots of press end of 2014 about this issue it basically repeats the same ...


3

When the connection is insecure, the strike through is supposed to be solid line over the https scheme name: https://support.mozilla.org/en-US/kb/how-do-i-tell-if-my-connection-is-secure That yours show up as broken lines is probably a graphical glitch.


3

... how it proves anything about my identity to the webserver? It does not. It only proves the identity of the server to you so that a man in the middle attack (where someone claims to be google.com) is not possible. If client identification is required (usually not) client certificates could be used. "The certificate is intended... Proves your ...


3

Why not register the certificate for a fully-qualified domain name, instead of for the IP address? Assuming you're running it as a server, and leave it running for good stretches of time, you'd visit the DNS provider, and change the mapping between IP address and domain name, only when you received a new IP address. Additionally you could request a static ...


2

It depends on the application but usually, that is no problem if you have root on the system Check what Host name the application uses, create a cert for that name, add it to the machine or application trusted root store and redirect Host name to a proxy server you control. After that, either configure the proxy to dump the clear text content of the ...


3

I sneakily edit a sneaky MITM attacker into your image: The problem with this protocol is that Bob does not authenticate with Alice. That means a man-in-the-middle attacker who can manipulate the data-flow between Alice and Bob can intercept the initial connection attempt from Alice and respond with their own certificate. Alice will then communicate ...


1

If you have clients that require old cipher suites, then make them VPN in to your webserver. The VPN session can mitigate the risks. If that isn't an option, lock them down by IP address. You can do this with a dedicated server such as legacy.company.com for clients that can't or won't upgrade


1

The AEAD format, after the 13-byte DTLS record header you correctly describe, begins with an 8-byte explicit nonce (combined with implicit nonce aka 'salt' from key derivation to form the actual nonce); this may be (epoch+)seqnum. Quoting https://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc6655 (which applies to both TLS and DTLS, remember): [...] The nonce_explicit is ...


1

The most logical solution is to place the name in the subject of the certificate, and use dynamic DNS to make the name point to the same raspberry PI. Of course, one would need a DNS server. If you can use IPv6 and having a DNS server is too much work, with it the Rasbperry would have a fixed address automatically with stateless autoconfiguration (based on ...


1

Since the policy of HSTS gets applied to the whole site it is enough that you sent it together with a resource which is definitely read by the client. This can be a HTML page, it can be an image, ... as long as the client will definitely request this resource so that it knows the policy.


1

NGiNX SSL Session ID available in $ssl_session_id variable. Other NGiNX SSL variables can be found here, Embedded Variables section.



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