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3

Your first question is really a legal one, and you seem to be assuming two things: The attacker is a government of some sort. That government actually respects citizen privacy and requires some sort of reasonable suspicion before it can force people to give up encryption keys. Neither of those assumptions are necessarily true. For all you know, some ...


1

Your assumptions in 1 are just false in many places. In the US, you cannot be forced to hand over encryption keys. That is not generally the case; in the UK, the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act makes it a criminal offense to not surrender encryption keys when asked. Assuming "just because they know I encrypt my data doesn't mean they think I'm ...


6

You're wrong in your assumptions. There are many legal jurisdictions where you can be required to produce passwords for encrypted data on suspicion, rather than proof, that the data may be relevant to a criminal investigation. If you don't provide your password, you can be jailed. But if there's no encrypted volume visible, they don't know to do it. For ...


0

The Metasploit Framework is my go-to tool for pentest automation still to this day, however, I do like what I've seen of CORE INSIGHT and Immunity Security SWARM. There are a few tools such as mana-toolkit and Responder.py that must be run outside of the Metasploit framework, but so many things can be done inside msfconsole these days (`use kiwi' comes to ...



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