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44

Tor uses a routing method called Onion routing. Much like an onion, each message (the core of the onion) is covered with layers of encryption. image attribution Your message is encrypted several times before it leaves your device. Node A can only decrypt (peel) the layer A, under which it would see the address of the next node. After the packet reaches the ...


38

TOR is better for you than it is for people in countries whose intelligence services run lots of TOR exit nodes and sniff the traffic. However, all you should assume when using TOR is that, if someone's not doing heavy statistical traffic analysis, they can't directly correlate your IP with the IP requesting resources at the server. That leaves many, many ...


31

As a very long time Tor user, the most surprising part of the NSA documents for me was how little progress they have made against Tor. Despite its known weaknesses, it's still the best thing we have, provided it's used properly and you make no mistakes. Since you want security of "the greatest degree technically feasible", I'm going to assume that your ...


30

No, it won't. The thing is that when you use HTTPs over TOR you: you use the public key of the server to encipher your message (so nobody except the server will be able to read your message). then you pass the HTTPs message (which, remember, is encrypted with the public key of the server) to a TOR node, this TOR node to another, and another and... ...


29

If you are in a crowd and you wear a mask, but nobody else in the crowd does, then you tend to attract attention... If you want to remain anonymous, then you must use only tools which do not single you out as a potential miscreant, i.e. tools that everybody uses. A good example is when you pay in cash: this is a mostly traceless payment system, and yet ...


22

You would also need to be careful of the fact that your ISP is in a position to see that 'your IP address' is using Tor, even though it can't tell what you're using Tor for. If conditions are so hostile that you could be brought under suspicion simply for appearing to be clandestine, then you should take care to use Tor everwhere except on an Internet ...


19

Yes you can run them side by side and not corrupt the security. This is because your Tor browser will send everything through a Tor proxy (including DNS requests) and your normal browser won't. Do mind that: If the NSA really would like to know what you are doing then they will find a way, bug your house, target your computer with malware, ... .


18

Tor provides privacy only under the assumption that at least one node in the randomly selected chain is not attacker-controlled (since we are talking about traffic analysis, simply eavesdropping on traffic entering and exiting this node, without trying to decrypt it, counts as "control"). This is probabilistic. If the attacker controls, say, 50% of all ...


18

It is an information leak on the Silk Road server. It appears somebody located a debug or info screen on the Silk Road server that dumped configuration and environment variables. Some possibilities: The output of Apache's mod_status (example) Output of phpinfo() (example) A custom debug page that is part of the Silk Road application It could have been ...


15

Shallot is an older program, there are newer alternatives available now: Scallion - uses GPU hashing, needs .NET or Mono: http://github.com/lachesis/scallion Eschalot - uses wordlist search, needs Unix or Linux: http://blacksunhq56imku.onion Eschalot can find longer human-readable names like seedneedgoldcf6m.onion, hostbathdarkviph.onion, etc. The ...


14

They know what are the TOR exit nodes addresses. So they just check your address and see if it matches with one of the exit nodes. Exit nodes are known to the whole TOR network, if you decide to run one exit node, then you should advertise it right? Or else no one will use it. Then people will know your IP is a ToR exit node. Simple.


14

Tor does not always protect your ip fully when you need to interact with the end node. You can check your efforts with online checks like this. What has worked for me on every check I've tried is JanusVM. It runs as a VM, which you use as a proxy for your hardened browser VM. Janus uses Tor, squid, dns-proxy-tor, and privoxy to cover your ip. It is very ...


14

It does give you considerably more protection than browsing directly. There are some identified weaknesses which offer potential routes to attack your computer, however these can be mitigated using normal protection on your machine (ie patch/av up to date, run as unprivileged user etc) but the only real weakness in terms of compromising privacy seems to be ...


14

In Tor, the user (you) chooses a random path through several nodes for its data. The first node in the path knows your IP address, but not what you send or where. The last node ("exit node") knows the target server address and sees the data (unless SSL is used, of course), but not your IP address. Every node in the path knows only the addresses of the ...


14

This is part of an expert witnesses' statement (probably an FBI technician). You can find it in a footnote on page 28 of the original sealed complaint: The code containing the IP address for the VPN Server is "commented out" on the Silk Road Web Server, meaning that is no longer active as of July 23, 2013, when the image of the server was made. From ...


13

In my opinion, this is an opinion-based question. Why? Because it does make sense to filter rouge exit nodes, but how do you know which ones are and which ones aren't? Where do you draw the line in your approach? Excluding exit nodes by country means that you'll eventually want to exclude all U.S. nodes (especially after all of latest NSA news). Then you'd ...


13

No the website does not know your real IP address. This is the point of using TOR. If you have an account on that website and log in they will know it's you, but they will not know your real IP address. When you use tor, you're passing through relays. These relays encrypt all the communications between them see below: With HTTPS traffic it goes like this ...


12

Anonymity is not sold by the kilogram. You don't get "twice more" by wrapping Tor within Tor. For that matter, anonymity is not an extensive physical property; it does not add up. Traffic analysis is the bane of anonymity. It works on counting bytes which enter and exit each machine. The inherent non-anonymity of Web accesses, with regards to powerful ...


11

2013 calling I think this question deserves a new answer after what we know now. Given the financial sources of the Tor project and what we learned about the NSA inserting backdoors (e.g. see here) casts a shadow on the trustworthiness of the project. From the annual report for last year (linked above): However, keep in mind that the US government ...


11

Have you seen the Tor document on how a Tor Hidden Service works? Essentially, in the same way that it's hard to find the source of traffic from a Tor exit node, it's hard to find the server operating a Tor Hidden Service. Authorities can't shut down the server, because they can't find out where it is. The .onion TLD is not really a TLD (so there is no ...


11

No, because knowledge of the method is not enough to break it. You would also need to acquire information (e.g. Decryption keys), which simply cannot be obtained by an attacker. The attacker can't figure out the source IP, or look at the data. Each Tor node only "knows" the source and destination of a block of data that it is handling. It can't open it to ...


11

TOR uses the principle of onion routing. Let us say there are 3 TOR nodes A,B and C involved (selected randomly by client) and the message is m. We assume the corresponding public keys of these nodes to be Pa,Pb and Pc. The message is repeatedly encrypted by the client starting with the public key of the exit node (Pc) followed by Pb and in the end Pa ...


11

I think it's important here not to overstate the capabilities of the various Three Letter Agencies with regards to identifying Tor users. The very first slide notes that they "...will never be able to de-anonymize all Tor users all the time". This means that the fundamentals of Tor are sound. The slide then goes on to note that "...with manual analysis we ...


10

In one line: they have a list of all the exit nodes. more detailed: I have seen this post demonstrates how to detect a Tor connection in php function IsTorExitPoint(){ if (gethostbyname(ReverseIPOctets($_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']).".".$_SERVER['SERVER_PORT'].".".ReverseIPOctets($_SERVER['SERVER_ADDR']).".ip-port.exitlist.torproject.org")=="127.0.0.2") { ...


10

I'll take a crack at explaining this without technical jargon. Lets say you want to send a nasty letter to someone, but you'd rather not deliver the letter in person for fear that they might get angry with you. You can ask a courier to take the letter from your house, and deliver it to the recipient, right? That works, but has the problem that the courier ...


10

Nope, the exit node can only decrypt the message and make the request, but he is not aware of where the original host is located, the only node that knows where the person is located is the second node. This is due to the layered encryption Tor uses. Every node only knows the next and previous hop, but not the whole path. Nope because of 1 Nope because of 1 ...


10

Aside from everyone else's answer, there is another, more simple reason. IP happens at layer 3 (IP layer) whereas SSL happens at layer 6 (session layer). So the SSL encrypted part of our packet is encapsulated by the IP layer, meaning that your IP address itself does not get encrypted by SSL (unless of course your application has a built in function to send ...


9

You should use a live cd like BackTrack. This comes with TOR and software for breaking WEP and WPA2-PSK. Then you can go war driving... are you old enough to drive? Also brush up on your OSI model, the MAC address is only needed by the data link layer and is there for scrubbed off by whatever router you are behind. However, some routers log what MAC ...


9

Ah, trust, that fickle thing... Tor provides anonymity for the download part. A download is: to obtain a sequence of bytes. What you do with these bytes is then completely up to you. Some sequences of bytes encode executable instructions that a computer will be eager to run. Executable files, scripts... fall in that category. If the file you download ...


9

It's not clear what you're asking, but a researcher likely analysed the Javascript code line by line. In doing so they saw the string "WinNT" and "Firefox", which is who the Javascript is targeting. Linux VMs, exe analysis tools are anecdotal and don't focus on the core target: Windows machines running Firefox with ToR. The Firefox version must be old ...



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