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2

You can test on your own: https://diafygi.github.io/webrtc-ips/ - or at least try to use google next time.


3

The list of nodes provided by the authorities is signed by all 8 authorities, the public keys of which are embedded in the tor client. You could prevent the client from booting, but it won't accept your list of nodes. (https://www.torproject.org/docs/faq#KeyManagement) : Coordination: How do clients know what the relays are, and how do they know that ...


0

No, your IP address will not be visible to the website, just the IP of the exit node. The implication of the unencrypted connection is that your communications with the site can be monitored by the exit node. This could mean stealing credentials, or attempting to fingerprint you via other possibly identifying information (headers, screen resolution, font ...


0

Depends what you want to do really, if you want to just want to be anonymous then use Tails. If you want to hack, Tails wouldn't be a good distro. So you need to set up your proxychains to go through TOR. See here: http://null-byte.wonderhowto.com/how-to/hack-like-pro-evade-detection-using-proxychains-0154619/


1

You need to supply the proxy switch when using curl: $ curl --proxy [PROTOCOL://]HOST[:PORT] For system wide proxy usage: System preferences -> Network -> Proxies Please be aware that using Tor as a system wide proxy will most likely identify you as a person and is not a good idea if you want to be anonymous. When for example you start your ...


8

The exit node will not know your address. The principle is that every server only knows the address of the previous and the next host but never the whole path. There are three steps between your TOR browser and the webserver: Entry-Node (Knows your address and relay nodes address) Relay-Node (knows entry-node and exit-node address) Exit-Node (knows address ...


3

When you use Tor your Internet traffic is routed via Tor which goes through several random relays before exiting the Tor network. Tor is "designed" so that it is theoretically impossible to know the original computer that the information came from assuming you are using Tor the right way. Exit node can see your plaintext traffic assuming you aren't using ...


2

This is half speculative but worth a consideration. While it is certainly possible to snoop on traffic the chances anyone will bother in general is very small. On the other hand if you specifically are a target then your laptop will be bugged and this is what I would be much more worried about. How's your personal opsec?


3

Here's a reasonable metaphor (I think). Imagine you're going to deliver a message to someone and you're gonna mail it on a postcard. That is, anyone who can get their hands on the postcard can read your message. Now, you pick 3 random citizens to help you—A, B, and C. You put C's address on an envelope and you put the postcard inside. Then you put B's ...


5

The focus of Tor is not privacy, but anonymity. When you use Tor, your traffic is protected under multiple layers of encryption as it bounces between relay nodes, before it finally reaches and is decrypted by the exit node. The exit node finally sends your traffic to the intended destination and the reply back to you through the Tor network. This setup has ...


13

When you use Tor, all data is encrypted between your computer and the exit node. As long as the exit node isn't on the same network that you are on (very, very unlikely to occur), the data will be protected from the local network. Note that meta data such as the fact that you're using Tor and rough estimates of how much data you are communicating may be ...



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