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2

So your question is basically: wouldn't the attacker, if operating your entrance node, be able to correlate the IP of the sender to [the recipient's] identity by identifying the key it's encrypted with No because the entrance node does not know this key. In short, the Tor client encrypts the traffic before it is sent to the entrance node and the ...


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I doubt anyone on this site will be able to tell you exactly what sorts of information outlook.com is recording, or how precisely that information is being communicated to MS. Microsoft doesn't explain the full details of that in most cases. What I can say is that Tor on its own may not be enough. In fact, if you are doing something questionable, it might ...


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You say that you do not trust Microsoft and want to hide your identity from that company. However, this is gapingly inconsistent with your action of using an operating system that consists of countless of megabytes of binary executable code produced by Microsoft. Suppose that you use an operating system whose vendor you do not trust; you suspect that it ...


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The cookie usually doens't hold IP information. And your browser isn't -as far as I know- able to determine your IP address and pass this on. Even when it would be, through a plugin/activeX control, it may be the RFC1918 IP address which is fairly useless. A cookie, however, can identify your browser. A website can set a unique value which your browser ...


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I know the IP addresses come from anyone running a tor node. Individuals that believe in the tor concept will run tor nodes from their computers at work or home. This can be in any country also so the IP address will change to another tor node. Im not sure on the exact times your node will change. Hope this helps a little.


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Wouldn't make much sense now would it? TOR creates encrypted connections from your pc to an exit node. More technical a key is generated to encrypt the traffic. (every node adds a layer of encryption) The data will arrive encrypted at the ISP server. The longer they wait with decrypting, the smaller the chance exists the key is still around. More precisely ...


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The idea of encryption is that you can't break it. At least, not without a lot of computing power and/or a lot of time (say, 80 years). So, you should be good to go. :-)


2

If hacking google to gather your phone details is considered a threat to your anonymity then surely the ISP logs must be also - they can relate you to your address much more so than most these other things, in which case a private VPN or TOR must be used. To be honest I would recommend TOR (browser/bundle) anyway, as it enforces the forgetful browser in case ...


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Every unencrypted thing that passes through that exit node can be seen, for as long as you use the node. That means plain http, but it also means POP3, SMTP, and IMAP email, telnet sessions, etc. Things that cannot be seen: your IP address, the contents of anything going over https or other encrypted protocols (but various side-channel attacks, such as ...


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I'm not saying either answer is WRONG, but here's the answer to your question: Yes, Tor ought to protect you from an admin looking at your traffic. If that's all you wanted to know, stop reading now. HOW TOR DOES THIS: Tor employs a principle called onion routing to ensure privacy (hence its name, The Onion Router). Here's how it works: You hook up to the ...


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For complete anonymity from the people administrating your campus network, you need to VPN out of that network into some VPN service provider's network. Proxies and VPNs have important differences. https://www.bestvpn.com/blog/4085/proxies-vs-vpn-whats-the-difference/ The service you use to do so needs to be trusted however, because they are now ...



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