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3

The MAC address is only visible on your local network. You don't need to hide it. With Tor or without Tor, as soon as the packet reaches your default gateway, that computer sitting between you and the next network segment, your MAC cannot be seen anymore. But if someone tries very hard to trace you, a special crafted website can get your MAC by exploiting ...


1

TLDR; It's possible to mask your MAC address, but it's still broadcast in plain text to anyone local to your network It's not really possible to "hide" a MAC address. The MAC address is used to determine where to deliver the actual packets, if you remove it from the packet, the router has no way of knowing where to deliver the packet. Think of it like a ...


1

If I remember well, Tor encryption works by encrypting your data with the public key of a randomly chosen node, doing the same for the result and repeating that again so everything is encrypted three times. Information on where to sent the data is included before applying each layer of encryption. The resulting data will be sent to the node that owns the ...


3

TOR will simply not work without encryption. When the ISP blocks the connection to the TOR network, TOR will not attempt to create an unencrypted connection as a fallback.


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No. Blocking a channel simply means that communication cannot take place along that channel. In order to read the content of a TLS channel, the attacker (in this case, the ISP) would need copies of the secret keys involved.


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Tor works like a chain of proxies, where each proxy only knows about the next hop and the previous hop. Simplifying a lot, when your computer sends data using Tor, your tor client will encrypt the payload, and forward it to another node. The next node does the same, and after a few iterations your packet reaches the exit node, is fully decrypted, and sent ...


0

Remember that Tor does not merely proxy HTTP; it works at a lower level and proxies arbitrary TCP connections, which means the node cannot possibly know when it has "all the data", because there could always be more. Even HTTP 1.1 allows multiple requests per connection, and you have HTTPS with the TLS handshake involving several roundtrips, and then there ...


3

If you use Tor or a VPN they cannot detect easily (that is without compromising your computer) which sites you visit, but they can still see how much bandwidth you use. And while they will not see the sites you visit they can just suspect the visiting of special sites from the fact that you try to hide it.


2

This is a bit of a grey area and it will largely depend on the laws in place in your country. In some countries you can be held accountable for the traffic you allow being passed over your tor node. Some countries consider Tor nodes to be carriers, meaning that if you do not actively monitor all traffic, you can't be held accountable for what goes over it ...



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