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The sequence to check-up is just exactly the same as if you were browsing from unsafe place, like public open wifi : full system scan, log checking, anti-malware tools risen to the maximum protection level. Tor/darknet is just a network, no darknet-specific problems there so far : you can leak your data with the same result as in clearnet/internet.


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Tor should have noscript installed. You simply click on the NoScript extension and click disable javascript on all sites. Unfortunately, once you've done something on the internet you can't change it. You can't go back and do it again differently, just like you can't in real life. Consider refraining from doing things you might later regret, especially if ...


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If you've always used that Facebook account through Tor, and never through your normal connection, and the Facebook account is for an anonymous identity rather than your real identity and you never make any references using your real identity to your alter ego and vice versa, and you never login, then using Facebook over Tor does not necessarily compromise ...


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Between your Tor client and the guard node, the communications are encrypted with three layers of AES128. The first layer is a key shared between you and the guard node. The second layer is a key shared between you and the middle node. The third layer is a key shared between you and the exit node. Each layer provides 2^128 possible combinations of keys. ...


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It depends on how you're using Tor. If you're using the 'Tor browser bundle' then you're probably fine in most cases. If you aren't using the browser bundle though, there's a chance that your DNS requests are going to be sent over the VPN, thus the VPN would know which domains you're visiting. Another unlikely scenario would be if the VPN happened to host ...


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When the FBI finally found the server it was due to the silkroad server leaking an IP address via captcha. The FBI was able to use that to track down the hosting provider. They showed up with a warrant and grabbed one of the drives. The Raid controller happily re-built the mirror onto a fresh drive and the operators never noticed. The FBI then had an ...


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So, what prevents ISP from seeing IP address of the first relay I'm connected to? Nothing. This is the whole point of Tor: this is part of the security model and it doesn't matter that your ISP can see you talking to a Tor node. Similarly, what prevents other ISPs of each Tor relay nodes/chain of proxies to see where they route traffic to and from, ...


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Your Tor software comes with a list of predefined directory authorities. These authorities maintain signed lists of relays from which your client can choose to build the connection. A new relay publishes a server descriptor to the authorities to advertise itself. Since not every Tor client acts as a relay, the number is smaller than you might assume and you ...



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