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0

From what I understand. You know what it's like to be under surveillance. You want to keep anonymity. Your threat model doesn't include TLAs (FBI, NSA, etc.) You want to visit websites more than communicate with others. So... First. Use a small laptop, not a phone. ANY (Android, iOS, Windows)phone leaks data like crazy. Google: SS7, IMSI Catchers. Use ...


4

Tor provides you anonimity. HTTPS protects (encrypts) the content of your data. HTTP does not provide none of these. Tor provides anonymity but does not protect the exploitation of an insecure application to reveal the IP address of, or trace, a TCP stream. Running HTTP over Tor means your communication data could be read and thus compromising your ...


7

Tor provides anonymity which HTTPS does not provide. HTTPS only provides end-to-end encryption, but a man in the middle can still see where you are connecting to and might find out more (i.e. which sites your are looking at in detail) by doing statistical analysis of the sniffed traffic. Tor tries its best to hide the meta-information like source and ...


3

I think you partially have the idea. This reminds me of when I saw aircrack-ng being released and many criticized that it would be used maliciously and perhaps to some extent it has. However, you can look at the way wireless security has grown and has actually become considerably more secure, simply from the amount of awareness. Another example, is the ...


0

Tor nodes need to encrypt two different types of traffic. Traffic moving through a circuit on the way to its destination. Traffic between Tor nodes to establish circuits, find hidden services, etc. In order for a source to encrypt data to a destination (1) a session key is established with the source and each Tor node in the circuit. For more details ...


0

Can exit nodes eavesdrop on communications? Isn't that bad? Yes, the guy running the exit node can read the bytes that come in and out there. Tor anonymizes the origin of your traffic, and it makes sure to encrypt everything inside the Tor network, but it does not magically encrypt all traffic throughout the Internet. Also, JavaScript is enabled ...


0

Appart from the "100% anonymity" from your title, which seem to include government agencies and can therefore never be 100% ensured, as long as the "online communities" are concerned some of them implement special policies regarding Tor's exit nodes IPs. For instance you can check Wikipedia where by default Tor's users are prevented from editing articles to ...


0

If a user has good trade craft and implements good tor hygiene by doing all the things you listed, it would be very hard to UID them..if not impossible. I know one of the most common methods that is emerging is pattern recognition that can analyze things like how a user types and then UID them from that, but that relies on things like javascript so if it is ...


1

ToR and associated products (e.g. Tails) provide a technological capability which will, if used consistently, allow certain actions to be taken online without any easy way to track them back to the person executing them. So it's likely that the weak point in an anonymous browsing setup will be the person operating it. Good Operational Security (OpSec) ...


2

Twitter seems to have a complicated history with Tor's users. The linked article seems to doubt of Twitter explaining they do not put any specific restriction against Tor's IP: Twitter does not block or force Tor users to phone verify in order to sign up. Occasionally, signups and logins may be asked to phone verify as they may exhibit behavior ...


5

Paying for VPS's is pointless in the quest for anonymity since there is a payment trail leading back to you... Unless bitcoin is used, which is questionable at the moment. I suggest you look at a TOR project called Tails. Its a read only, live bootable only operating system that is completely configured to route any internet access via TOR only and forgets ...


1

X-Forwarded-For header may be used to forward client's real IP in case of source NAT. But not all application use them. This header is often inserted by load-balancers or reverse-proxies, depending the architecture in place, when the application needs to know the real IP belonging to a client. When this header is inserted, the application can see 2 IPs: ...


0

DynDNS does not differ from standard DNS in any way. The issue with Tor is that it only handles TCP, while DNS query usually relies on UDP protocol. Due to this, without further precaution, DNS resolution queries will be sent outside of the Tor tunnel. You should therefore use a specific distribution, like Tails or Whonix, which will ensure that all your ...


0

The site is probably just checking whether your IP address is in the known list of ToR exit nodes. A pretty much identical question exists here : http://tor.stackexchange.com/questions/1229/how-to-chain-proxy-after-tor While I somewhat question your motivation (are you attempting to bypass this block due to you actually being a spammer?), I'm going to err ...



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