Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

TOR also maintains a directory of exit nodes, which is public. So, it's easy to detect that a user is coming in via a TOR proxy by simply checking if their origin IP is listed as a TOR exit node.


0

You should be aware that Windows allows administrators to run scripts on any computer that connect to the local Windows domain, so if you login to the domain, the admin controls your computer. The same is potentially true by just connecting to the network. This is the untrusted network threat model, which is almost impossible to protect against unless your ...


47

First: Don't use work computers for personal use, people! Many network policies forbid personal use. Our policy states that personal use is not forbidden but is monitored. If you don't want to be monitored you need to use equipment you control. TL;DR: If you don't want your parents to know you smoke, don't smoke in front of your parents. Work ...


28

Generally speaking No. Assuming: You follow Tor's best practices Tor does not protect all of your computer's Internet traffic when you run it. Tor only protects your applications that are properly configured to send their Internet traffic through Tor. To avoid problems with Tor configuration, we strongly recommend you use the Tor Browser. so if ...


1

YES ! I will explain why . Last August spikes in Tor client downloads were traced to a large click-fraud and Bitcoin-mining botnet called Sefnit. The malware was using TOR to communicate with hackers in order to transmit stolen data and receive additional commands. At the same time Members of the Tor Project noticed that the number of Tor clients online ...


4

Some Tor exit nodes are known to be hostile, typically injecting advertising Javascript into any unencrypted web page that passes through them. There's no reason such nodes can't inject attack Javascript or other malware. Barring a security flaw in the Tor software itself, an entry or relay node cannot attack your computer (other than trivial attacks such ...


-1

If you're willing to spend a few bucks, there is a service provided by Ntrepid (or a subsidiary) called Anonymizer. It allows you to choose your point of exit, provides a virtual browser with a built in VPN, and masks your personal IP address. It can be found at www.anonymizer.com


3

Where did you get the concept that using VPN to connect you to tor will send you to jail? First of all, you shouldn't be sent to jail (in a decent country) if you don't do anything illegal. I'll take that as a metaphor for someone is able to identify you but you should be precise. You can connect through a VPN and TOR in two ways: Connect to Tor, then to ...


6

If you delete your TOR data directory, TOR will randomize how it builds new circuits and picks new entry nodes. However, the behavior you are seeing is intentional. TOR has affinity to a small set of entry nodes, called entry guards. These guards help reduce the chance that you are assigned an entry node which is malicious, because your computer is only ...


0

The compromised tor you were mentioning was tor-browser, which was a browser a couple of version older than its bleeding edge counterpart but came with some privacy plugins installed. Always use updated browser and software if you want to be more safe. Regarding rogue exit nodes, it would require a lot of luck (there are way more exit nodes than what they ...


0

Just some ideas: Using a radio broadcasting device of any sort will allow signal finding to identify the source location. I would not use a cell phone regardless of its origin. By implementing a private VPN service prior to entering the TOR network you can shift point of origin and further muddy the path. Make sure you update Tails to get the fix to the ...


1

There have been compromised certificate authorities - and the list of trusted authorities is very long and geographically dispersed. I would certainly consider nation states to potentially have the ability to orchestrate this sort of attack. The only real solution to this problem is certificate pinning or using another layer of encryption on the payload ...


4

When you connect to a site over HTTPS, your browser checks that the certificate was issued by a certificate authority that you trust (typically built into your OS or web browser) and that the certificate matches the domain of the website you are visiting. So if your ISP can get you to install a certificate corresponding to fraudulent certificate authority ...



Top 50 recent answers are included