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Per xander and Goblinlord's comments, let's go over some of the technologies you mention. VPN (virtual private network) solutions are used to create secure network connections over the public Internet. If you have more than one office location, or you have people working remotely from home or on the road, you use a VPN to enable secure communications ...


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well the bonus points would go a clever 'exit node' to someone who has your exact OS and some of its specifics of your machine (its possible to leak this out of your browser, or some cleverly injected JS, all within the realm of possibility for a malicious exit node.) An automated malicious exit node potentially has a library of exploits in various versions ...


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No and No to both of your questions. In reference to your first question google TOR DNS leak just as an example. While this is simply an example a good question to pose to yourself is "how secure is acceptable?" In reference to your second question, in this situation you would simply moving one end-point of the encrypted traffic from your computer to a ...


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If you do DNS over your local unencrypted network, a third party could see what names you were looking up and might be able to glean some information out of those lookups. If you're a deep-cover CIA operative somewhere and they can see that you're going to super-sekret-email.cia.gov, well, even without that traffic you might be in trouble. There's also a ...


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In that case the connection between anonymizer and webserver would be just as unencrypted as the connection between exit node and webserver. It would still be possible to eavesdrop on it. All you get from this is that you get an additional layer in your onion circuit (the outer layer is the https connection between you and the anonymizer) and that you shift ...


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You should use something like that: https://www.eff.org/https-everywhere It's created in colloboration with Tor developers, so you can rely on that if you already decided to trust Tor itself. Edited: My bad. Yes, SSL Everywhere addon won't provide you secure connection in case the target website doesn't support SSL at all, thanks to raz for pointing this ...


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Many application aware firewalls and proxies can detect Tor and alert or block on it on their own. Also, you could implement Bro-IDS with Critical Stack Intel and use their updated tor exit node list to alert or report on. https://intel.criticalstack.com/


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From Detecting TOR Communication in Network Traffic: A successful method for detecting Tor traffic is to instead utilize statistical analysis of the communication protocol in order to tell different SSL implementations apart. One of the very few tools that has support for protocol identification via statistical analysis is CapLoader. Clearly, this is a ...


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Bonding two channels to the same AP is done. But you want to take it one big step further. You could perhaps do something of the kind using two wireless cards, two separate ESSIDs and some fancy footwork at kernel level (not all OSes would be able to do that), using bonding; or, even more complicated, by using two WiFi chips on a card that would simulate a ...


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The ability to deanonymize using this method involves correlation among other traffic by your IP. The more traffic available to correlate, the better chances of deanonymizing. I believe the use of "common locations" denotes an AS containing many other popular sites, maybe to include gaming servers, StackExchange web servers, CDNs, etc. Perhaps an ...


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Your apparent IP address will vary according to the exit node you are randomly assigned when you start Tor, and there will be an unknown number of intermediate nodes (controlled by unknown parties) between you and the exit node, creating an unpredictable amount of latency. There is no quality-of-service guarantee. There's also no logging-in necessary. The ...



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