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Being able to generate a pair of keys with the same .onion address is of no help when trying to impersonate an existing service. Impersonation requires generating a key with an existing address, which is a preimage attack, not a collision attack, and so the full 80 bits of address length are providing security. 80 bits of security is considered adequate at ...


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Anonymity isn't binary. There is a sliding scale of anonymity on the web. How much you need to do depends on who is trying to deanonymize you, what resources they have and how much of those resources they are willing to spend on you. Depending on whether you are considered an advertising target, a nuisance to a specific website, a copyright violator, an ...


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VPNs Traditional A traditional Virtual Private Network does not extend your ISP. A VPN extends an existing private network across a public network. For example, lets say my company has a private network with email servers, web servers (intranet), and DNS setup for company related services. It's a private network for company employees only. However, ...


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A VPN means your connections pass through one other server. The administrator of your network can't see anything but the fact that you're talking to that VPN server; the administrator of the computer you're ultimately connecting to generally can't see your real source address (though they can see that you're connecting from a given VPN service); but the VPN ...


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Yeah so my understanding is that Tor relays your traffic through several computers in the middle, which make it near impossible to determine from the exit node who originated the traffic. VPN's act as a sort of extended ISP that that can track who made the connection (if logging is enabled) to trace it back to you. The Tor browser also has built in ...


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Strictly speaking, computers are deterministic systems, and thus are not "tainted" by the virtues or vices of whoever is on the other side of the keyboard. That a given piece of software is written by, say, a member of the Illuminati, does not imply that running the software necessarily opens a gateway to Hell. However this does raise an interesting ...


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Hi I've been a TOR user for three years now. What I like about this is that it uses a system wherein the information pitched from your computer is encrypted and passes from one node to another thereby making it hard for hackers to track all your activities. If you are a someone who fears of his safety or if you just want your administrator to not trace your ...


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If I'm reading your question correctly, you'll be fine. You're still hooked up to Facebook via SSL, whose security isn't, at the moment, broken. Tor now includes HTTPS Everywhere, which would force Facebook to use SSL (assuming it was supported) even if it didn't do so by default (which, at the moment, it does). Since Firesheep (a bit later in 2010 than that ...


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I think it is a good idea to use special linux distributions like Tails Tails is a live operating system, that you can start on almost any computer from a DVD, USB stick, or SD card. It aims at preserving your privacy and anonymity. or Whonix Whonix is an operating system focused on anonymity, privacy and security. It's based on the Tor anonymity ...


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Use an alternate identity. Browse on TOR using a public connection and computer that is wholly separate from your home network. A VPN to hide your location might be a good idea as well. Do not mix your identities in any way shape or form. That will give you the most anonymity.



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