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1

X-Forwarded-For header may be used to forward client's real IP in case of source NAT. But not all application use them. This header is often inserted by load-balancers or reverse-proxies, depending the architecture in place, when the application needs to know the real IP belonging to a client. When this header is inserted, the application can see 2 IPs: ...


0

DynDNS does not differ from standard DNS in any way. The issue with Tor is that it only handles TCP, while DNS query usually relies on UDP protocol. Due to this, without further precaution, DNS resolution queries will be sent outside of the Tor tunnel. You should therefore use a specific distribution, like Tails or Whonix, which will ensure that all your ...


0

The site is probably just checking whether your IP address is in the known list of ToR exit nodes. A pretty much identical question exists here : http://tor.stackexchange.com/questions/1229/how-to-chain-proxy-after-tor While I somewhat question your motivation (are you attempting to bypass this block due to you actually being a spammer?), I'm going to err ...


1

There is just one thing I want to correct in the good answer of @JoedeLyes: Tor has no control over the traffic between the exist node and the destination server. I mean it can not encrypt in anyway the communication between the exit node and the destination server, and that is one of the weaknesses of Tor because exit nodes are vulnerable to eavesdrop. As ...


2

For your question, you can imagine TOR like a proxy whose administrator can see everything you do if it is not encrypted. Every unencrypted content you send through TOR can be seen by the owner of the first and the last node. And every content not signed can be potentially altered by these nodes. Here is an article about a security researcher trying to ...


2

Even if Tails offers anonymity and coming with default built-in encryption suites for different purposes, your anonymity is already compromised since as in all schools/universities we find the same policy: to use their WiFi they need to be sure you are either a student, a teacher or an authorized person to access their Wifi. Also you must remember that ...


3

There are two general categories of vulnerability to your anonymity that I would be concerned with given that setup: Using web sites that identify you (it's a moot point if you then go log into Facebook with your real name!) Traffic analysis - if your school requires login info specific to you, then the school knows who's sending the traffic, and if they ...


3

Why not install however you want, then mark the disk immutable, then take a snapshot? Every time it restarts, you'll get back to the disk image as you set it up. This way you can use FDE if you like, and still not have any persistence session to session.


1

Microsoft is able to remotely push code to your machine that will be installed and executed with the system's privileges the next time Windows Update runs (a practical example of this is the new "Get Windows 10" tray icon bullshit that continuously stays running in memory). So, while they definitely won't be doing this on a large scale (eventually someone ...


2

There are a number of known vulnerabilities, that have been used, to deanonymize Tor users via leveraging JavaScript. The first major incident where this happened was with the "Freedom Hosting" seizure by the FBI. The FBI kept servers online, and then installed javascript paylods which exploited a zero-day exploit in Firefox. This caused the computers to ...


0

I believe this is to stop "browser fingerprinting". Javascript can get a lot of information, like the order that fonts are installed on a computer, the size of the screen, etc; - there is a good example at https://panopticlick.eff.org/ . If you go to another site bypassing TOR, on the same computer, then the two sites may be able to compare notes, and ...


0

In short, you only have Microsoft's promise that they won't do that. If Microsoft were to log your activity inside programs for their own purposes, they would likely come under a lot of fire for doing so, both in terms of people being angry as well as possible legal action (especially from government agencies that use Windows). I wouldn't worry too much ...


1

Tor browser prevents somebody watching your Internet connection from learning what sites you visit. It prevents the sites you visit from learning your physical location, and it lets you access sites which are blocked. This statement is valid for Microsoft Windows OS. So to answer bluntly: No. EDIT: Following your comment: As by your machine ...


-6

Tor is suposed to hide yourself, with JS you can get the IP of the computer so that's why


15

I do not know where you got that information but wherever you got it, the official documentation is more reliable: We configure NoScript to allow JavaScript by default in Tor Browser because many websites will not work with JavaScript disabled. If you disable JavaScript by default but then allow a few websites to run scripts (the way most ...


1

Recent versions of TOR(>= 4.5) allow for specific entry/exit node selection. By adding the bellow entries to the ./Data/torrc: EntryNodes {ru} ExitNodes {ru} StrictNodes 1 you can pick the countries/regions of your entry/exit nodes.


0

If your goal is anonymity then yes. But bear in mind that TOR, using a layered encryption scheme through a number of network, is considerably slower than single layer encryption using a direct connection. Transferring large files slows down the network for all users using the same circuit. Note that each user that connects to your hidden service uses a ...


3

Do not panic, that is the normal behavior you could expect. It is designed that way. But why ? As mentioned in the documentation: choosing many random entries and exits gives the user no chance of escaping profiling by this kind of attacker. The solution is "entry guards": each Tor client selects a few relays at random to use as entry points, and ...


0

The Why has a simple reason that is valid every where you need to establish a secured communication between two machines: exchange application data over the secured channel they have established. All messages sent between two onion routers are encrypted using session key. In other words, as long as those session keys are maintained the communication is ...


2

The communication between Tor's exit nodes and the Internet is not different from normal traffic which thing makes Tor also prone to MITM attacks. Entry nodes do not cause a problem, but exit nodes do. To answer straight forward to your question. it depends on what you mean exactly by see my requests. In practice, by design TOR is such that locating the ...


1

The traffic between your computer and the TOR entry node is encrypted, so it is not possible for someone to see the unencrypted content of your TOR traffic between your PC and the entry node. The traffic between the TOR exit node and the site you are accessing is not always encrypted (depends on the site), so it would be possible for somebody to sniff and ...


0

Tor communication is not only encrypted but Tor is also functioning in a way that makes it looking like normal HTTPS which thing renders its detection almost impossible. In other words, the communication between Tor's exit nodes and the Internet is not different from normal traffic which thing makes Tor also prone to MITM attacks. But (your question's ...


0

Proxychains should work just fine. Your problem is definitely a configuration error. Just to be complete, another solution would be, while anonymous via Tor, to rent a machine with a publicly routable IP and use that as a proxy. Depending on your anonymity requirements and the service provider's ToS you may need to use a prepaid credit card, Bitcoins (a ...


0

Your ISP if they are preforming a MITM(SSL strip) attack can indeed see what you send the first hop, but they will be able to see the second and not be able to see or inject into the third. Tor works in layers. Each layer is a separate TLS connection. MITM You | GuardN RelayN ExitN Dest | -----|-----| ----------------------| ...


0

Tor was written to be secure even when connecting through an insecure network. Since they're giving you Internet access they can obviously read all your traffic, but unless they have exploits no one knows about or managed to utilize the known ones they won't be able to decrypt your traffic.


5

They can not read your traffic, because the communication between you and the entry node is already encrypted.


3

As you can see youtube URL is: https://www.youtube.com/. It starts with http"S", so your connection is encrypted for sure. So no worry about your Account Security. In addition, when you want to sign up for Youtube, what you need actually is to create a Google Account via this URL: https://accounts.google.com. Again, this is http"S", so it is end-to-end ...



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