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24

Blocking Bittorrent is challenging, and can't really be done effectively with port blocks. The standard ports are 6881-6889 TCP, but the protocol can be run on any port, and the peer-to-peer nature of the protocol means that discovering peers that use unblocked ports is simple. Blocking Bittorrent traffic could be done with a deep-packet-inspection or ...


11

This is a bandage for a much larger issue... When I setup networks for small offices (50 clients or less) I'll use a business-class (entry-level) wired router such as a Fortinet Fortigate 40C or a Cisco RV042. You can block traffic based on: IP - Addresses and Ranges FQDN - Fully Qualified Domain Names Geography - You can block access to countries if you ...


11

You have a number of ways to restrict torrents: Blocking ports: this doesn't work, because p2p traffic can use pretty much any port (even ones below 1024) Deep inspection: looking at traffic and blocking based on type can help you a lot, however encrypted traffic all looks alike Destination filtering: this may also help a bit, but you'd have to maintain a ...


10

BitTorrent uses a method called Chunking, in which files are divided into 64 KB – 2 MB pieces and each piece is further divided into 8 KB – 32 KB chunks. Each chunk is hashed and the hashes (along the chunking information) are stored in the torrent's metadata (the small .torrent file, or the metadata you receive via DHT). That, along with the info_hash, ...


9

Don't waste time with complex technical measures: make clear to the employees what your policy is, then simply fire the next person who torrents a film.


8

Correct. As explained in that article the torrents use the BitTorrent protocol to share Sony's stolen data. Each piece that is downloaded via a seed is linked with an index into the file, and the hash of that portion is checked and verified. However, I don't believe its this hash that they are referring to in that article. Below I'll describe the process ...


7

Without a backdoor installed on your machine, an attacker would not be able to know what software was installed. If 100% of your traffic passes though an encrypted VPN, then it is not possible for an ISP to know what data is being transmitted. However, protecting the transport layer with a VPN may not conceal the type of protocol used to transmit the data. ...


6

The BitTorrent Sync Android and iOS apps seem to follow the BitTorrent.com privacy policy which states explicitly that they gather data such as total traffic and performance metrics. We also aggregate some data from the BitTorrent Client regarding total traffic flows and content delivery performance. I don't see any problem with that; it's completely ...


5

First of all, there's nothing inherently dangerous or illegal (except perhaps in unusual jurisdictions) about using BitTorrent. There are plenty of free clients out there all that are well-respected and trustworthy. BitTorrent is frequently used to distribute large open-source projects, such as ISO files for Linux distributions. It's also used by companies ...


4

BitTorrent can run on any port, and can be wrapped inside SSL, so blocking by ports or traffic data isn't going to get you anywhere. My suggestion would be to block HTTP traffic on any port which matches the tracker announce protocol, as per the specification. This won't work if the tracker is running on HTTPS, but most don't. It also won't prevent DHT from ...


4

ISPs have never been involved in the process of determining weather or not specific traffic is related to a Copyright violation. From a technical perspective the ISP is one of the worst places to impermanent such a monitoring system. (There is a huge amount of traffic flowing through an ISP, and huge number of possible copyright violations. At best case ...


4

The growing popularity for Torrent proxies is for anonymity. You can encrypt traffic all you want, but it can always be traced back to the public facing node. The contents of your communication will remain private, however it can be identified that your IP address was in communication with a remote IP address. Without a proxy that will trace back to either ...


4

SHA-1 is 160 bits (or 40 hexadecimal characters), whereas MD5 is only 128 bits (or 32 hexadecimal characters). Using this file as an example, the Info Hash is: 353E1F88B06C7AFBEB0692E25CE75F05A9E44FB0 Which is 40 hexadecimal characters, so I assume it's SHA-1. Note that this value isn't the hash of the actual file you're trying to download, rather: ...


3

Yes, a VPN would mask your HTTP requests as they would be routed through the tunnel. Unless your ISP is somehow exploiting a weakness in the VPN protocol and decrypting the traffic, they would not see the requests.


3

It depends on who "they" are. If you're torrenting, the university can use commercial traffic inspection tools to identify p2p protocols. The tools are signature based, and the signatures are proprietary, so the exact methods used and methods to circumvent them vary. If you're torrenting illegally distributed copyrighted content, then the rights holders ...


3

If you use a public hosting service, that service could of course also keep track of what it's hosting and who uploaded and downloaded it. If the filehost is not a honeypot, if you use an unsecured or semisecured connection with a known protocol to transfer your files, the ISP could track whenever you initiate a file transfer. If the protocol works with an ...


3

Freenet is the closest to what you mention as it acts as a fully P2P service sharing between nodes in approx. equal ammounts dependent on your settings. I2P doesn't have the same P2P infrastructure and works purely message-based but can still transfer similar amounts of data just not in the same egalitarian way you mention. You can find a quick comparison ...


3

As far as I know pfsense performs very simplistic traffic shaping where by it prioritizes traffic based on port range. This is just so that you can play games with someone else using BitTorrent on the network. This is just to be friendly, this is not for "security". Trying to filter all BitTorrent traffic at the gateway is very a difficult problem and a ...


2

When writing binary output data try instead using open('bomber.out', 'wb').write(data) I can't verify if this will help but it might be worth a try.


2

In addition to VPN, try also to use another DNS than your ISP's DNS too; to prevent DNS leak. There are many public ones including Google's public DNS.


2

Torrent clients offer encryption of traffic using RC4, and people consider this, like, very safe to hide traffic information from ISP. People are wrong to do so, but not because RC4 is even remotely the weak point. Simply knowing which IPs you're connecting to allows precise determination of the torrent you are downloading by an opponent who simply ...


2

Torrent poisoning means that peers join the swarm which don't contribute to it and only use up resources. One method is an evil peer which claims to be seeding the whole file. However, instead of returning valid data, it returns garbage. The clients won't notice this until they received the whole chunk and verified the checksum, which means that they wasted ...


1

I would recommend u block alle UDP-Ports 1-65535, also all TCP-Ports except one which brings you further to your squid-proxy running with filters and ACLs to undertake more filtering options. uTorrent wont have a chance to connect!


1

I think what you are looking for is 'parental controls' on your modem/router. Check your router if such a facility is available. If its not, then a browser that has such controls. The cheaper versions will just give you an option to enter the names of the websites that you want to block. The pricier ones will have advanced software (like privoxy as mentioned ...


1

I guess that most corporate people setting up Internet access for the employees may have the same need: how to ensure that employee does not waste enterprise's bandwith to download torrents? Usually, the main answer lies in two things: Restrict the destination port numbers to the really needed ones, Setup a DNS cache server, which can provide an easy way ...


1

Port Forwarding is just a technique used to enable "proper" network connectivity for some applications that are running on NATed devices (almost all home computers). Port forwarding in itself a risk factor - the risks occur with regards to how the destination computer handles the incoming connections. e.g. If you forward port 22 (SSH), make sure you have a ...


1

Port-forwarding means that when a connection is attempted on a specific port on your router, that connection will be forwarded to you (a machine behind the NAT) on that specific port (or, depending on the setup, it can be a different port, but let's not get into that). Is it risky? Well, it can be risky. It all depends on the application listening on that ...


1

I think that you can make use of one of these possible solutions: You can use a third party software other than Ms, like ISA server or kerio firewall prog, which is a good option depending on your needs you will have to create a set of rules for blocking ports, mostly all p2p programs use a determined bunch of port numbers. You can use the service of sies ...


1

I would suggest that you use a free UTM such as the one from SOPHOS. it will sit at the place of your firewall and has all in one features for a small office and is free. It will give you the ability to block and monitor the website categories you want. Also, it can protect against malicious downloads.


1

The first thing I would take a look at is your firewall. Why is the common port used by torrents open for instance? Probably because your firewall has an implicit allow. You need to change this to an implicit deny and white list what you would like your users to do. For example you could say only this proxy server may connect out to the internet over ...



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