New answers tagged

0

To address the DNS leak issue, I'm certain you can obtain the IP address of your VPN provider that you are making the connection to and firewall off all outgoing connections heading to any other IP address on any port other than the specific IP and port being used by your VPN. That will prevent any "leaked" traffic from exiting your network. Done. After ...


2

In case of cacert.org, they are presenting a self-signed certificate and that's why your browser complains. There is no trust chain that leads from the certificate to a root CA that you trust. If you were using a Linux distribution that comes with their certificate pre-installed, you wouldn't see a warning. It would be inferred that by using such a system ...


3

There are really two things you need to trust here: the DNS response's authenticity and privacy. Authenticity You can be reasonably sure of the authenticity of the data returned if all of the below are true: The site supports DNSSEC The site's TLD supports DNSSEC Your client checks DNSSEC - For a browser I recommend the extension at dnssec-validator.cz (...


0

I would like to add that while the technology is the same with 256 bit encryption, you are also paying for the following factors: Level of validation - this is the amount of checks that the issuer will do to verify your company or website Number of domains - how many domains this certificate will be valid for Trust level - as members mentioned above, you ...


4

You shouldn't trust them. You may suffer from "DNS Leaking". Ideally, your computer should send DNS Requests through the VPN, but it may request it directly. Your IP address will be exposed. Anyone snooping on the connection to the DNS Server will see what site you are accessing. That also opens you up to the dangerous Man-In-The-Middle attack. Use DNSCrypt. ...


2

While using your own VPN you can increase your security, putting the DNS server on the side of the network of the VPN service, and forcing any DNS request going through it through your own local DNS service/proxy. The ISP/DNS provider of the server/network where the DNS is hosted can however log, intercept and modify your DNS queries. Setting up a DNS ...


7

No, you can't. It's as easy as you search information about "DNS leak" topic. When you use a VPN, you have the risk of a DNS leak. In other words, your DNS resolution will be made outside your VPN. Second, VPN server knows (in some way) who you are, where are you from and where you want to go. It's the same risk that exit nodes of Tor Network pose. ...


-2

If you are a technical person and also if you are security expert than you should not trust on any third party DNS. Because of there are so many websites and web-server , those are provides their services and also sell their data to another hackers for their profits. So If you have your own well prepared DNS and VPN then trust on yourself only.


-1

If you are using a VPN and that VPN is using a public DNS then your requests are most likely anonymous enough. The truth is that if they want to find you badly enough they will. Running your own DNS would be a bad idea as the requests being sent to a DNS with only one user would stand out as strange. I would say you should find the most popular DNS there ...


3

You can't, unless the code that runs is entirely client side and interpreted directly from source, in which case they can verify it trivially with standard file comparison tools. The reason is that you would have to prove that the entire software stack of the system was trustworthy, and that the entire hardware stack was trustworthy, and that every point on ...



Top 50 recent answers are included