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6

A "Secure Desktop" is a desktop that can only be run by the system itself. That sounds a bit weird, and probably doesn't explain much. In Windows, a desktop is a view that allows you to interact with processes. When you log into Windows (the log in prompt) you are on a desktop. When you are logged in, and see the start menu, you are on a seperate ...


6

Acting as Windows is called running as SYSTEM. SYSTEM is the user account that has the lowest level access and can do anything on, well, the system. Windows uses the SYSTEM account to run key services that keeps the system in order. If you can run as SYSTEM then yes you can pretty much do anything you want on that machine. The problem is that it's really ...


3

When they run the script as a Local Administrator, it fails with access denied. Then this means that being a "Local Administrator" is not sufficient to run the script. This proves that "Local Administrator" does not cover the full set of rights on the machine. In the context of UAC, a "Local Administrator" does not have the full rights of an ...


2

found this: http://www.minasi.com/apps/ chml filename -rl remove mandatory level


2

There is always a limit to how much the OS can protect the user from himself. But UAC is firstly concerned with blocking processes from performing potentially destructive actions without your knowledge, so it asks for your explicit approval. Yes, you might still run a virus because you wanted to see the dancing pigs - but that's YOUR choice to ignore the ...


2

I will provide you the technical details of the exploit you are talking about and then let you decide yourself whether you should worry or not. The bypassUAC exploit exploits a bug (or rather a feature) of Windows operating systems where processes signed by the Microsoft code signing certificate don't prompt the user when it escalates its privileges to ...


1

UAC Was never ment to be a security measure. Should you worry about it? It depends on what you're doing about it, if you're using the administrator account then yea you should, but if you have the administrator locked with a nice password and you're using a second account then what's to worry about?


1

The scenario you have described could possibly work. May not happen in the exact way that you depicted. .desktop files can sit in any location of the victim computer . NOTE: It needs UAC to get inside a protected location. Anyway it needs to be executed to starts its actual work. In case of windows just a double click (an execute command in case of ...


1

How about calling the "net use" command from your VBS logon script? Even thought the script itself runs under the Administrator token, any programs started by the script will run under a Standard user token, which means that drives mapped this way will be available to the user. Your example could be adapted to look like this: Set shell = ...


1

Use Powershell and set your execution mode to allsigned. It's the best of the worst options for powershell execution methods, issue a code signing cert from your internal CA and sign your login scripts. (new-object -com WScript.Network).MapNetworkDrive("g:","\\Saturn\data") (new-object -com WScript.Network).MapNetworkDrive("k:","\\Saturn\stuff") ...



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